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This week's editor

Manuel Serrano

Manuel Serrano is Junior Editor at DemocraciaAbierta.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

How to improvise with refugees

Borderline, a new play by Sophie Besse about - and with a cast of - refugees represents an ideal of being together

To hell in a handcart

The comforts of pessimism are to be found in an illusion of control

The BBC may soon be unable to compete

The requirement for output to be “distinctive”, coupled with the growth of media consortia, could force the BBC out of the game.

The proposal for government appointees threatens BBC independence

The Director General of the BBC warns that the proposal by Sir David Clementi to have the government appoint the BBC Chairman and half the board could pose a threat to the corporation's independence.

British media: not quite black and white

New research reveals Britain’s TV viewing is split along racial lines, and risks amplifying this division by excluding whole groups from the shared national conversation.

Does British TV have a problem with independent documentary?

The Unorthodocs season at Somerset House features acclaimed documentaries never seen on British TV. Are UK broadcasters denying audiences access to a golden age of independent film-making?

Current and future threats to public service broadcasting

While today we still stand on secure ground, are we about to witness a fairly catastrophic scenario for the future of Public Service Broadcasting?

Bike courier in London: the messenger is the medium

A review of Julian Sayarer's new book, "Messengers". A cog in the wheel of the global information economy, this courier allows the City to deliver its true message of redemption to him. 

Why the BBC needs Hoggart’s vision now

We need a vision of public service broadcasting that extends intellectual and imaginative freedom, and is as relevant to today’s battles as the Pilkington Report was fifty years ago.

Would a privatised Channel 4 still be a serial risk-taker?

Would a privatised Channel 4 continue to support innovative programming, the independent production sector and the creative economy?

What has Channel 4 ever done for us?

Would Channel 4’s commitment to innovation, experiment and creativity survive privatisation?

How did mistrust of mainstream media become a sign of violent extremism?

The UK Government’s Prevent strategy has led to official claims that mistrust of mainstream media and anger about government policies can be symptomatic of violent extremism.

A brand of manliness that is bad for the world

While women’s movements fight for empowerment, what is now destroying men is, paradoxically, the expectation to be powerful. Agnish Ray reports from London’s Being A Man festival. 

“All those featured are white” - what can we do about diversity at the BBC?

Fifteen years since the BBC pledged to reflect “the UK’s diversity in our programmes, our services and our workforce” little has changed. Why, and what can we do about it?

The BBC: what is really going on?

Is the BBC spinning a big lie over the need to find cuts of between £550 and £700 million a year to fund the cost of the over-75 licences?

Why the BBC’s independence is the best guarantee of its creative freedom

The BBC should have an effective system of regulation that guarantees its editorial independence and creative freedom, including the freedom to fail.

If the BBC’s not independent, it is no use to any of us

In the week Tony Hall called for strengthening the BBC’s independence we follow contributions from Colin Browne and Howard Davies to ask could a new regulatory structure be the answer? 

Why does the BBC see the future of television production as a commercial venture?

The BBC plans to take the bulk of its television programme production out of its public service division to create a separate commercial body, BBC Studios, which would be a wholly owned subsidiary of the BBC Group.

Is the BBC’s wall-to-wall coverage of the Paris atrocities doing the terrorists' job for them?

How informative, entertaining, and educational is saturation reporting of the Paris attacks? Is the BBC simply helping ISIS to build its distinctive, shock-value brand?

The media did cover attacks on *insert country here*. You just weren’t reading it.

After the Paris attacks many people are saying how horrible the media is for belittling tragedies outside of Europe and the US, but mainstream media did cover attacks on *insert country here*. You just weren’t reading it.

After the Trust, how can we guarantee an independent BBC?

Most agree the BBC Trust is a busted flush, but that leaves a dilemma: what model of governance might provide the best guarantee for the BBC’s independence?

Which source do students trust more? BBC News vs Facebook News Feed

Despite growing disenchantment with TV and the press, new research finds students continue to trust the BBC and mainstream media more than their Facebook friends.

Is the BBC licence fee still up for grabs?

John Whittingdale says the July agreement did not settle the BBC licence fee: is this a Government U-turn?

The BBC and the over-75s: what is the truth?

The BBC viscerally opposes subscription: it wants universal access to homes that only criminal enforcement can deliver.

The BBC as market shaper and creator

Accusations that the BBC is ‘crowding out’ the broadcasting market are flawed. We need a new framework to assess its contribution to industry and society within the UK and abroad.

Sue Lloyd-Roberts a unique phenomenon at the BBC

Investigative journalist Sue Lloyd Roberts who died this week, fought for the oppressed and downtrodden. The BBC should keep her mission alive with a unit dedicated to human rights worldwide.

A radical proposal to preserve the BBC’s independence

To safeguard the BBC’s independence decisions over the Licence Fee should be taken away from politicians and handed over to a new independent statutory body.

Corbyn versus Snark

Bob Dylan provides a sound-track for Britains' liberal commentariat post-Corbyn: "something is happening here, but you don’t know what it is, do you, Mister Jones?”

Corbyn and housing justice in Britain

The election of the new Labour leader is a time for guarded hope but not for a change of tactics. Local campaigns must unite in a national movement.

Who's afraid of the 'global poor'?

Shifting the migration debate to consider the impact of global phenomena such as climate change and global capitalism on the movement of people requires an understanding of scarcity and insecurity as factors which affect citizens and non-citizens alike.

Architects for Social Housing: fighting a political 'crisis'

London’s housing ‘crisis’ is not a result of faceless economic forces: it has been carefully prepared and legislated over a number of years to serve the interests of those who benefit from it.

ERT: the inside story of Greece's free speech experiment

The inside story of ERT - the Greek public broadcaster shut down by the former government, which kept broadcasting in a show of defiance, and was finally re-launched by Syriza last week.

Relationship remembered

Andrea Luka Zimmerman’s film Estate, a Reverie, is an unruly celebration of extraordinary everyday humanity. At the Open City Documentary Festival on 21 June 2015.

Estate of mind

Andrea Luka Zimmerman’s film Estate, a Reverie is a moving documentation of what gentrification really means to those affected by it. At the Open City Documentary Festival on 21 June 2015.

Liberty, Equality, Fraternity ... and welfare

How do the political camps map their favourite welfare policies onto political values? A report from the Ax:son Johnson Foundation seminar on the future of the welfare state

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