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This week’s front page editor

Claire Provost

Claire Provost is editor of 50.50 covering gender, sexuality and social justice.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Save Ridley Road – how the community is fighting back against faceless developers

Whilst the media bemoans the ‘death of the high street’, across London, investors are trying to drive out the kind of local, culturally appropriate small retail that keeps areas alive.

7 ways the ‘Finance Curse’ harms the UK – how can we lift it?

The City of London is a huge drag on the UK’s real economy. But we can – and must – lift the 'Finance Curse'.

George Osborne’s Evening Standard under fire (again) over lucrative Uber deal

Exclusive: Politicians call on UK advertising watchdog to investigate paid-for content dressed up as news at London’s biggest paper, after glowing articles about the controversial taxi app firm appear – but with no mention of sponsorship in hundreds of thousands of copies of the newspaper

Opinion: George Osborne’s real ‘Future London’ is a crass exercise that readers won’t swallow

Someone needs to tell Osborne that Londoners are not mugs. The rebrand of his controversial deal with Uber, Google and others still stinks.

George Osborne’s Evening Standard launches delayed ‘money-can’t-buy’ campaign – with more controversial partners

Private healthcare firm and a French conglomerate with a record of lawsuits against media join Uber, Google and others in lucrative sponsorship deal.

George Osborne’s Evening Standard delays controversial Uber, Google deal

In the wake of ‘cash for column inches’ scandal and calls for Osborne to resign, newspaper denies that £3 million 'paid-for news' deal has been ditched

Osborne’s Evening Standard ‘cash for column inches’ denials ‘do not stack up’ – says Caroline Lucas

Green Party leader calls on London paper to ‘come clean’ about its hidden commercial agendas – citing another lucrative sponsorship deal with GM giant Syngenta

Everyday Lexiteers - an interview

 "The European Union is inherently racist, unchanging, technocratic and oppressive. Nothing makes any of those things okay, not even a nice conversation, or falling in love with a French girl."

George Osborne’s London Evening Standard sells its editorial independence to Uber, Google and others – for £3 million

Exclusive: Newspaper promised six commercial giants “money-can’t-buy” news coverage in a lucrative deal, leaving millions of Londoners unaware of who’s paying for their news.

The uncomfortable truth about post-Soviet comfort foods

What nourishes us also destroys us: this old saying holds true not only for food, but also politics.

Young, trans Nigerians: ‘people need to see that we exist’

It may become harder for church and state to deny that trans Nigerians exist, thanks to activists like Miss saHHara.

Three more ways to build solidarity across our differences

For most people divisive rhetoric isn’t new; they’ve been developing ways to counter it for years.

How a GM giant ‘bought control’ of what millions of Londoners read

The Evening Standard’s lucrative deal with Swiss chemical giant Syngenta shows how commercial giants pay for news – with readers left in the dark.

Austerity stories you won’t hear about in today’s Budget

Rhea needs a home. She is a full-time single mother of three living in destitution on the brink of homelessness. Yet two local authorities are reluctant to help. Why?

How to start a housing movement

Radical groups working on housing, racism, poverty, sex worker and migrant rights are springing up all over London. Embedded in local communities, they are seasoned activists, precarious workers and families.

Housing activists stand up to dodgy landlords and council bullies

The Grenfell tower fire forced a public debate on housing inequality in London. Tenants have long been at the mercy of landlords, private and social. But resistance is growing.

How housing activists are challenging town hall decisions

Using direct action, housing activists challenge unfeeling and harsh local authority decisionmaking 

Is Lexit a centrist fantasy?

Lexit exists more in the mind of its opponents than in any on-the-ground reality. Why do commentators in the FT and Economist talk it up?

‘I won’t be displaced again’: the fight to save London's latin market

Community members and traders mobilise to save a Seven Sisters market from regeneration plans that could transform it into “unaffordable” flats and chain stores.

The right to blasphemy: is this the boundary between civilisation and barbarism?

Former Charlie Hebdo journalist Zineb El Rhazoui collects fatwas like badges of honour. Her recent book outlines similarities between the Islamic and European far right.

How Charlie Gard became a cause célèbre for the US Christian right

“Charlie’s Army never sleeps”: the case of British child Charlie Gard and the growing power and global reach of American conservative activists and “pro-family” organisers.

The politics of nudity as feminist protest – from Ukraine to Tunisia

Frontline activists, including women who use their topless bodies as political statements, are gathering in London to deplore threats to free expression worldwide.

Too many Afghan women in London face racism, sexism – and unwanted pregnancies

Recent research on Afghan immigrant women in London has revealed a multi-layered crisis. What can be done to address this, and to empower them?

We’re having an election. George Osborne must put his Evening Standard job on hold until it’s over

Can the former UK Chancellor, who masterminded the Tory victory in 2015, really deliver ‘straight facts and opinion’ as editor of London’s flagship paper during this election campaign?

Five ways to build solidarity across our differences

How do we build bridges between people who could be allies for radical change but who view each other with anger and suspicion?

How to improvise with refugees

Borderline, a new play by Sophie Besse about - and with a cast of - refugees represents an ideal of being together

To hell in a handcart

The comforts of pessimism are to be found in an illusion of control

The BBC may soon be unable to compete

The requirement for output to be “distinctive”, coupled with the growth of media consortia, could force the BBC out of the game.

The proposal for government appointees threatens BBC independence

The Director General of the BBC warns that the proposal by Sir David Clementi to have the government appoint the BBC Chairman and half the board could pose a threat to the corporation's independence.

British media: not quite black and white

New research reveals Britain’s TV viewing is split along racial lines, and risks amplifying this division by excluding whole groups from the shared national conversation.

Does British TV have a problem with independent documentary?

The Unorthodocs season at Somerset House features acclaimed documentaries never seen on British TV. Are UK broadcasters denying audiences access to a golden age of independent film-making?

Current and future threats to public service broadcasting

While today we still stand on secure ground, are we about to witness a fairly catastrophic scenario for the future of Public Service Broadcasting?

Bike courier in London: the messenger is the medium

A review of Julian Sayarer's new book, "Messengers". A cog in the wheel of the global information economy, this courier allows the City to deliver its true message of redemption to him. 

Why the BBC needs Hoggart’s vision now

We need a vision of public service broadcasting that extends intellectual and imaginative freedom, and is as relevant to today’s battles as the Pilkington Report was fifty years ago.

Would a privatised Channel 4 still be a serial risk-taker?

Would a privatised Channel 4 continue to support innovative programming, the independent production sector and the creative economy?

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