only search

This week's editor

Rosemary Belcher-2.jpg

Rosemary Bechler is openDemocracy’s Editor.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

After Paris: live news should challenge narratives, not recreate them

After the Paris attacks there is a desperate desire on the part of major news organizations to create and drive the narrative of terror attacks, when what they should be doing is questioning and interrogating narratives.

Charlie Hebdo and western denial

The recent attacks in Paris were the latest round in a conflict of violence, not of “values”. The primary perpetrators of this violence are western states, with Islamist terrorism representing an inevitable blowback.  

Six (possibly) civilising uses of incivility

Civilisation depends on some incivility, carefully applied. It depends also on civility, liberally applied

Charlie Hebdo: how journalism needs to respond to this unconscionable attack

The killings at the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo highlight the threat to media workers in a world where free expression faces many violent threats. But they provide no excuse for hateful rejoinders.

The 2015 UN conference on climate change: towards a new EU failure?

Will the 2015 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Paris be another conference of big promises and disconcerting results? An insight into unsatisfactory EU environmental policy. 

Un autre imbecile, eating

In a rainy Paris our Sunday Comics author finds riches that more than compensate for a failed business meeting

Monuments to resistance

With the rise and repression of popular political protest on the streets of southern Europe, new monuments to resistance are emerging, memorialising novel moments of potential revolutionary history. 

The return of the state to the Parisian banlieue

Eight years since the 2005 Parisian riots and French Prime Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault announces a ‘return of the state’ to the banlieues. The recent resistance to this ‘return’ has marked an end to its short-lived political consensus and has forced a revaluation of what it truly means to be a citizen of France’s so-called ‘abandoned’ suburbs.

A French debate on prostitution

Back from Paris where she has been interviewing prostitutes, politicians, police, and feminists who argue both for and against legalising prostitution, Valeria Costa-Kostritsky asks whether legalising it would benefit both those who want to leave prostitution, and those who feel it is their only way to earn a living.

Libyan rebels encircle Sirte as Gaddafi son presses for resistance

Libyan rebel forces encircle Sirte, as Saif al-Islam Gaddafi presses for resistance. South Korea appoints Yu Woo lk as its new unification minister. The Sri Lankan government introduces new anti-terrorism rules after emergency laws expire. And Iran plans to continue enriching 20 percent uranium. All this in today’s briefing…

Who killed the poet?

Bardo and Ophelia at the triumphal arch: will the censored verses of Hamlet reveal to us who killed the poet? An extract from the new novel by Luis de Miranda

20, 2000 and 2: the three shadows of Facebook

The eternal campus of the global middle class; the solution to the injunction to love ones fellow; a riskless replacement to reality. You could not have designed Facebook better to opiate 21st Century occidentals

Religious secularity

Is there a difference between secularity and secularism? Are they both essentially Christian, or essentially religious concepts? An interview with the arabist and medievalist, Rémi Brague

France approves sale of high-tech warship to Russia

International concern about sale of French amphibious warship to Russia. US aims for new sanctions on Iran “within weeks”. 197 people indicted for murder over Philippine massacre. Sir Lankan opposition leader treated “like an animal”. All this and much more in today’s security briefing.
Syndicate content