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This week's editor

En Liang Khong

En Liang Khong is submissions editor at openDemocracy.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

International Security Correspondent Paul Rogers provides weekly commentary on the 'war on terror'. His acute commentaries are an indispensable guide to explaining the present conflict's development and mapping the future.

The airstrike harvest

From Afghanistan to Syria and Iraq, western assaults take lives and fuel enmity. Now Russia has joined in, the chances of blowback grow yet higher.

Russia in Syria, and a flawed strategy

Moscow's entry into Syria's war is a challenge to the United States. But it also conjoins the two powers in military-political blunderland. 

A world in transformation

The refugees' great march to Europe highlights global fractures that can no longer be avoided.   

Britain's nuclear plans: the Corbyn factor

In the debate about replacing the Trident nuclear system, there is space for options that link British to international experience.  

Remote control vs Islamic State: a new phase

Britain's drone-killing of two of its ctizens in Syria sets a precedent with implications for states and conflicts elsewhere in the world.

Migration, climate and security: the choice

The forces driving people's movement into Europe were already apparent in a near forgotten incident of 1991.

Air war vs Islamic State: myth and reality

The intense United States-led bombardment in Syria-Iraq is escalating. But how effective is it?

Jeremy Corbyn’s first 100 days

What alarms the opponents of the Labour Party's probable next leader? That he is not thirty years behind the times - but ten years ahead.

Blowback: Iraq war to Islamic State

A direct line connects the United States-led campaign against Iraqi insurgents in 2004-07 and the war being fought today.

The thirty-year war, renewed

Islamic State's spreading influence in a range of countries makes the military efforts of the United States-led coalition look almost irrelevant.

What’s behind the Corbyn surge?

The wave of support for Jeremy Corbyn in the race to be Labour Party leader reflects a generation's search for a path beyond neoliberal austerity.

Raqqa writes back

A sixth letter from Islamic State territory reveals elements of the group's thinking about current international developments.

On not bombing Syria

British pilots are revealed to have been engaged in attacks on Islamic State in Syria. The government plans to make this role explicit and direct. What will be the consequences?

Islamic State: why so resilient?

After months of bombing by the United States and its allies, Islamic State has survived and even expanded. Its unique character explains why. 

Ten theses on security in the 21st century

What have we learned from the openSecurity experience as the section goes into hiatus? A lot. But governments, police and military, surveillance agencies? Not so much.

Islamic State vs Britain

The massacre of tourists in Tunisia's coastal resort of Sousse reveals Islamic State's intention to target Britain. There is more to come.

Sousse, Kuwait, Lyon: a triple alert

A single day's armed attacks reflect the intensity of the Islamic State war and are an augur of more to come.

Britain's information-light war

The UK's military focus is shifting to remote-control warfare using armed drones. But the move is surrounded by a wall of secrecy. 

Pope Francis and climate politics

A Vatican document links a hot planet to world poverty and the need for change. Its immediate impact may be on the United States presidential race.

Reimagining security

Does security mean defence: tanks and barbed-wire fences? Or can it mean building relationships, confronting inequalities and recognising each other's humanity?

Iraq and Libya, the prospect

The resilience of Islamic State a year after its breakthrough makes an escalation of the current war inevitable.

Security services should not have carte blanche

It seems obvious that human rights must be compromised to guarantee security in the face of armed violence. Obvious but wrong.

Islamic State, the long war

The United States military at last shows some awareness of how hard the current conflict will be, and how deep it will have to go.

How to defuse the devices of the nuclear-armed states

The five-yearly review of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty ended without any agreed commitments, unbalanced as ever between the nuclear-armed states and the rest. Time to change the agenda. 

Islam and non-violence: Badshah Khan's example

The story of a Pashtun hero of peaceful struggle needs to be told, now more than ever. An original new book does just that.

Morocco, UN myopia and the Libyan crisis

It may be understandable that the UN should clutch at any straws to address the miasma in Libya. But Morocco shouldn’t be one of them.

Iraq's phantom army

Islamic State's takeover of Ramadi and advance on Palmyra show that the options facing Washington in Iraq-Syria are ever narrowing.

Islamic State, a message from Raqqa

How do young recruits to Islamic State from the west see their campaign? A fifth personal communication from inside the group.

Britain's defence, the path to change

The combination of expensive military projects at a time of austerity should, after the election on 7 May, create the space for an overdue rethink of the UK's international security policy.

Multilateral nuclear disarmament: it would be a nice idea

The conventional wisdom among nuclear-weapons powers is that their arsenals can only be dismantled multilaterally, step-by-step—yet the associated co-ordination dilemmas keep proving insuperable.

Climate change: the south gets real

The pace of reaction to the global climate emergency is increasing, and vulnerable states in the global south are often in the lead.

Iran behind the conciliatory veil

Right-wing US and Israeli venom against the outline agreement is one thing; genuine concern about the Islamic regime’s Shia expansionism and human-rights record is however another.

Mediterranean dreams, climate realities

The drowning of would-be migrants attempting to reach Europe is a humanitarian tragedy that reflects a growing crisis of environmental security.

Prohibiting autonomous weapons systems

They have been dubbed ‘killer robots’. Concerted international action is needed to prevent the emergence of weapons which could operate without meaningful human control.

A tale of two men

The experience of fighters on opposite sides of the "war on terror", marking the 700th column in this series.

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