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Guantánamo: the inside story

About the authors
Clive Stafford Smith is a human-rights lawyer who has spent twenty-five years focusing on the issues of race and the death penalty in the United States. In 1993 he established the Louisiana Crisis Assistance Center, a non-profit law office. He has represented more than 200 people on death row, and several of the detainees held by the United States in GuantÌÁnamo Bay, Cuba.
Isabel Hilton is the editor of chinadialogue.net, and was editor of openDemocracy from March 2005-July 2007. She is a journalist, broadcaster, writer and commentator.

Listen to the full interview (37.42 mins)
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Guantánamo: what is it really like?
Hear Clive Stafford Smith, who visits Guantánamo regularly, talk about the camp, the prisoners and what it’s like trying to defend men the president has described as the “worst of the worst.”

Listen to part one (3.06 mins)
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Guantánamo: what are conditions like for the prisoners?

Hear Clive Stafford Smith talk about life of the men – and boys – inside the prison camp. “I have visited most of the death rows in America and none of them compare to the treatment of those prisoners there.”

Listen to part two (1.12 mins)
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Guantánamo: the lawyer’s story.

Hear Clive Stafford Smith talk about what it’s like to conduct client attorney interviews in Guantánamo. “It all depends on whether you believe in Santa Claus.”

Listen to part three (2.28 mins)
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Guantánamo: How does a prisoner’s lawyer win his trust?

Hear Clive Stafford Smith talk about the dirty tricks the US military plays on the lawyers and their clients in Guantánamo: “Nothing I’ve heard, is of any consequence to US security whatsoever, unless the fact that my clients have been tortured and abused by US soldiers is of consequence to US national security.”

Listen to part four (3.36 mins)
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Guantánamo: why bother to defend men whom the president of the United States has described as the “worst of the worst”?

Hear Clive Stafford Smith explain why he is working for the Guantánamo prisoners. “It’s always been a rule of my life that if someone is being hated, you have to get between the hated and the hater.”

Listen to part five (3.05 mins)
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You can listen to the entire interview with Clive Stafford Smith (37.43mins) here:

in flashplayer
in realplayer

Guantánamo: the big diversion? Why have only nine of the more than 750 men who have been in Guantánamo been charged?

Hear Clive Stafford Smith explain. “Those three people were meant to stand up in court and say ‘I’m guilty’ just like in the days of Joe Stalin … It’s meant to divert your attention from the fact that Osama Bin Laden has never been caught.”

Listen to part six (3.20 mins)
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Guantánamo: what will happen to the prisoners who haven’t been charged?

Hear Clive Stafford Smith on US efforts to save face as it tries to close down Guantánamo.

Listen to part seven (5.02 mins)
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Guantánamo: has the prison made any contribution to the “war on terror”?

Hear Clive Stafford Smith explain why it has been the worst public relations disaster America has ever known.

Listen to part eight (2.54 mins)
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Guantánamo: the torture. What is the role of the United States in the upsurge of torture around the world?

Hear Clive Stafford Smith, whose clients have been tortured, explain.

Listen to part nine (5.17 mins)
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Guantánamo: the future. If it is closed down, will that make it all right?

Hear Clive Stafford Smith explains that the real problem is the secret prisons around the world and how the US based “catastrophic decisions” on false evidence obtained through torture.

Listen to part ten (4.56 mins)
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