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This week's editor

Dawn Foster, Co-Editor

Dawn Foster is Co-Editor at 5050 and a freelance journalist.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

The answer to the refugee crisis? A return to European ideals.

The refugee crisis is symbolic of the political crisis in Europe. To avoid systemic collapse, Europe must return to solidarity and protecting those fleeing war and persecution.

Another Asia Minor disaster

Greece is a microcosm of the world, complete with money problems and refugees. The EU should be doing more to aid those rendered most vulnerable by the crisis.

A journey to the end of the Western Balkans

Despite seemingly breaching the Dublin regulation, the EU’s response to Hungary’s anti-migration fence has been limited to a single, prosaic press statement; "We have only recently taken down walls in Europe; we should not be putting them up."

The siren song of financial realism

Financial realism has enchanted European polities. It is a song the powerful love to hear. But a song that will destroy all that is good and humane about Europe.

Three myths behind the case for Grexit: a destructive analysis

Any hope of a radical change in the economic direction of Europe requires international solidarity, and that solidarity in turn requires the euro.

Hungary’s refugee policy: fencing off the country

The rapidly increasing influx of asylum-seekers poses a huge challenge to Hungary. The government responds with a complete lack of solidarity, massive demagoguery and arm-twisting in Brussels. 

Objectivity, neutrality and the call for virtuous anger in academe

The problem with this perception of academic research as objective, dispassionate and free from emotion runs deeper. Neutrality, especially in social sciences does not exist.

Post-Suruc Turkey

“Today, it is from the collective efforts around the Kurdish movement that we are learning what a society made up of free individuals might look like in Turkey.”

The Syriza problem: radical democracy and left governmentality in Greece

Syriza’s extraordinary problem – which would not be faced by any other political party in government – was to alter internal institutional frameworks under conditions of external institutional assault. 

The crushing of Syriza: an Aesopian fable

In 2010 the image of ‘ending up like Greece’ was that of a Dickensian debtors’ prison. In 2015 it is that of hell.

The Greek referendum: a peculiar situation and an infamous act

A close adviser to Greece’s former Finance Minister, Yanis Varoufakis, gives an insider view of the government negotiations with the Eurogroup. Interview by acTVism Munich. Deutsch.

A spectre is haunting Europe — the spectre of democracy

Since Greek voters rejected Troika rule by a landslide, the Hellenic citizenry presents a threat far greater than the government it elected. It must be punished.

Varoufakis’ unspeakably shocking plan B

This Greek rule-bending ambition, from a position of weakness, violates the basic principles of financial realism.

Neoliberal realpolitik: choking others in our name

This lack of lived experience with the violence of our state entails an almost inevitable blindness to the deepening divide between those our states protect and those whose life it represses, expels, and humiliates.

Is counter-propaganda the only antidote to propaganda?

Russia Today is packed full of lies. But aren't there motes aplenty in our own eyes onto the world? Is media credibility shot, and can we hope to improve trust in news?  An academic conference this autumn in Prague aims to bring journalists and acdemics together to explore the problem

O enemigo da Europa não é a crise Grega

Uma moeda única implica um estado federal, como os Estados Unidos ou o Brazil. A crise Grega confronta a Europa com o seu futuro. English.

Europe’s enemy is not the Greek crisis

A single currency implies a federal state, like the US or Brazil. The Greek crisis confronts Europe with its future. Português

Here we are

A Greek question to which the answer comes eventually from elsewhere.

The UK's EU referendum and the EU's legitimacy crisis

"Is a UK that retreats in isolationist but somehow progressive splendour really feasible? Surely, European countries must cooperate in the face of the deep challenges and opportunities we face."

Which is more likely: a progressive Brexit or a progressive Europe?

EU institutions and socio-economic policies are hopelessly anti-democratic, inducing a current of deep nihilism across the continent. But don't be fooled: a progressive Brexit is deeply unlikely.

Greece has two choices. And so do the creditors

After 13 July 2015, Syriza's Greece and, for that matter, the creditors have two choices. Modernise the Greek state; or let Greece default and risk disintegration not just of EMU/EU but also Nato.

The Brussels diktat: and what followed

Alexis Tsipras won the battle on a question of principle - the need for a new Europe - even if he lost the war that ensued. What are the implications for the Greek left and for Europe? (Long: 9,000 words) Français. Deutsch.

Germany's demographic challenge

Germany is by no means an unstoppable juggernaut, and the re-erection of trade barriers across the continent and a return to a strong Deutschmark would ravage the economy.

The left returns to an old love – saying No to Europe

It is the politics of Europe’s current rulers that must be challenged, not the UK’s membership of the EU.

“What now for Greece? What now for the left?”

Logics of financial capital are all the more powerful blended with cultural logics. From now on, do Greeks need to keep their “orientalist radar” active wherever they go?

What Europe can get from Iran

In shifting its relationship with Iran from containment to engagement, what could Europe gain from this historic nuclear agreement? Excerpt from the latest ECFR policy briefing.

German offensive, Greek resistance

Europe needs Tsipras to pass the agreement in Parliament, where there is a no majority without the bulk of Syriza votes.

The outline of a “deal”

Imagine if the US states had rejected the Constitution and opted to keep the Articles of Confederation; Europe remains in this embryonic, weak and unstable state.

Momentous times for democracy in Europe

The shocking behaviour of the Eurozone leaders in punishing Greece for voting against austerity has alarming implications for the future. Is it too late to put democracy and Europe together again?

Young and European? We are Greece, we are the 99%

When will a true European democracy based on the people, not the states, finally emerge?

European Commission’s deregulation drive threatens EU nature laws

Deregulation is often packaged as a fight against red tape or a drive to improve efficiency by removing so-called ‘burdens’ on business or ‘barriers’ to trade. But such ‘burdens’ are the social and environmental standards that protect us all and the world we live in.

A 12 step guide to the EU’s crisis of political responsibility

Why are European institutions incapable of implementing values that honour fraternity, solidarity, and a dignified life?

Varoufakis’s dogma

Europe was not, and still is not, ready for the level of consolidation that the Greek Finance Minister suggested. On the other hand, Varoufakis was not ready to compromise his ideas either.

Yanis Varoufakis, James Dean of the European left

According to the distinction made by Max Weber, Varoufakis answers to his convictions while Tsipras holds the future of Greece in his hands for Greece and Europe.

In bad faith

Debt relief must happen now—more than the IMF suggests—to prevent the need for even more debt relief later. This is as much in the creditors’ interest as it is in the Greeks'.

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