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This week's editor

Ray Filar

Ray Filar is co-editor of Transformation and a freelance journalist.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Interviewing Babah Tarawally, Dutch novelist and former refugee from Sierra Leone

Babah Tarawally’s message is one of hope; he urges refugees to emancipate themselves from both a racist or excessively self-pitying discourse, and to acquire an active role in the construction of their future. 

From the sorrow to the shame of Belgium

The legalisation of this 'newcomer’s statement' is an undeniable step on the slippery slope in the dehumanisation of Europe’s ‘new Jews’. Alarm bells should be ringing.

Where will we end up? Terrorism, Islamophobia and the logic of fascism

Fascism is not only a form of prejudice, it is also a political logic. A logic that reduces complex problems to ‘us and them’ issues.

« Punish the deserving »: the war against terror and its dead ends

In spite of the colossal amount of resource consumed during the operations evoked, none of the coercive options of these last fifteen years has proved effective with regard to the pursued objectives of stabilization.

No alternative in Europe to a long, hard struggle

Don't be conned by those determined to free Britain from EU “red tape” – their catch-all term for employment rights, consumer protection and environmental regulation.

As Poles shift right, democracy runs scarce

While the Law and Justice party insists that local disputes are best settled at home, Polish opposition and fearful individuals have been reaching out to international forums for support.

Shifty antisemitism wars

Convened by Israel’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA), the Global Forum for Combatting Antisemitism has become a strategizing opportunity on how best to thwart a growing BDS campaign.

The case for Europe, 2016

In an interdependent world, nationalism offers no bolt-hole. The task for all progressives is to find effective ways to engage with continental partners, creating a new blend of national and European politics.

2016 will be remembered as the EU's year of shame

2016 will be remembered as the year in which the European Union definitively broke the civilisation pact on which it was founded after the Second World War.

Refugees and realistic European options

The EU Commission needs to satisfy both a majority in the European Parliament and a qualified majority in the Council of Ministers.

"The corollary of the derivative is the border": visions for the democratic control of movement

Democracy is created in the seizing of it: those who are democratizing movement are those who, in their actions, are implicitly or explicitly demanding the abolition of borders.

Response to Thomas Fazi's critique of DiEM25

A large digital assembly, properly set up, would reasonably conclude that the mechanisms of global capitalism need to be regulated, redistributing wealth from those few to the rest of us. Deutsch.

The EU must not leave Greece to solve the migration crisis

Still, the boats come. Detention, as a solution to this, would have to be on a scale hitherto unimaginable in the EU. We need alternatives, and migrants need to be part of them.

The idea you can skip the nation-state is dangerous

DiEM25, the movement to democratize the European Union, is urged to rethink its approach, taking events of the last two years properly into account. Interview.

Refugee and migrant arrivals in the EU in 2016: who are we talking about?

A thoughtful analysis should deconstruct narratives portraying migrants as a ‘weapon’ and identify them for what they are: people looking for international protection or, at most, better living conditions.

What’s DiEM25, really? Reply to an open letter by Souvlis & Mazzolini

As in the 1930's, it is our duty to reach across party affiliations and borders to create a pan-European movement of democrats (radicals, liberals, even progressive conservatives) opposed to the forces of evil.

Open letter to DiEM25 responding to the recent Rome launch

European cosmopolitans run the risk of remaining unheard by the very people suffering the democratic deficit the most, to whom the initiative DiEM25, should be able to speak.

The executive deficit of the European Union

The oft-repeated mantra of ‘more coordination’ won’t provide a real solution to Europe’s political crises unless the EU’s dual executive architecture is first rationalized and democratized.

« Nuit Debout » : citizens are back in the squares in Paris

What distinguishes a social movement from any other kind of mobilization is the fact that it does not focus on a specific claim (such as labour reform) but challenges some of the core values ​​of a society. Français Español Português

Europe can learn from its largest ethnic minority

Soon, the European Roma Institute for Arts and Culture will be established in a major European city yet to be revealed. It’s time to look to us for guidance, solutions, and inspiration.

More than a welcome: the power of cities

What is the scope for circumventing the national and EU deadlock over migration, and what role can cities, together with solidarity movements, play in overcoming this crisis?

Dutch popular rejection of the EU-Ukraine Association Agreement: a self-inflicted wound

For everybody who knows a bit about the EU, the nationwide, expensive and low-turnout Dutch plebiscite on this EU-Ukraine contract looks in itself rather odd.

Should environmentalists think twice about their support for the EU?

Brussels is a haven for the fossil fuel and motor industry lobbies, while the EU is increasingly undermining its own environmental protections.

The youth ruse: mobilizing concern for the younger generation

Reading through The Trials of Generation Y, a series of inflammatory headlines pit the young against the old, while skirting around the question of deepening inequalities within all age groups.

From tourist dream to existential threat, it’s time to bid farewell to Club Med

The collapse of the Mediterranean neighbourhood, once Europe’s success story, is the casualty of both terror and the financial crisis. It threatens to transform mare nostrum into a moat.

Bleeding heart liberals and the war on terror

Demonisation is used by the right to prevent the left actually opposing the war on terror with more than platitudes; criminalisation is used by the state against those against its crimes.

Cities of refuge

The 1951 Geneva Convention on Political Asylum was a typical creation of the Cold War: the system cannot deal with the huge population flows now permanently characteristic of our world.

The other of the others am I: risk and alterity in the Brussels attacks

An excess of security may not only increase paranoia, but can also make the ‘otherness’ much harder.  Português, Nederlands, Español

The making of an open and democratic Europe: reading Brexit through E.P. Thompson

There is no room for Britain’s turning away from Europe to a fantasy mid-Atlantic or neo-Commonwealth position of the kind floated, typically unseriously, by Boris Johnson and Michael Gove.

Iraq and Syria didn’t create ISIS - we did

After the Paris attacks, ISIS became yesterday’s story, as if the terrorist movement had disappeared into far lands not able to affect our lives any more.

Manifesto for civil liberties

The origins of the manifesto, its elaboration and dissemination, followed by a brief history of the struggle for civil liberties in Europe and the main threats to those freedoms. Español

Blimey, it could be Brexit! Introduction

A battle over Britain consumes the Tory party, that will decide the fate of the UK and perhaps even Europe. In a week by week experiment worthy of this dramatic development, Anthony Barnett aims to write a book about it ahead of the referendum. Here is the introduction.

Good camps, bad camps. What’s wrong with the ‘Jungle’?

The ‘Jungle’ has come to symbolise the negative mirror image of a refugee camp, its ‘Other’ in which power and civilisation are twisted and virtually turned upside down.

“We have created a monster”

On the recent electoral successes of Germany's extreme right and its ideological background.

After Germany’s Super Sunday

Recent elections in three German states were widely considered a referendum on chancellor Merkel’s immigration policies, much to the benefit of her own supporters and her nationalist critics. Any place for solidarity with refugees?

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