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This week's editor

En Liang Khong

En Liang Khong is openDemocracy’s assistant editor.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Book review: The Egyptians

Jack Shenker's The Egyptians: A Radical Story is a must read for anyone who wants to understand how and why Egypt's revolution happened – and why it continues.

Stability Sandwiches: the control of street entrepreneurs in Sisi’s Cairo

The post-Sisi drive to restore and sanitize public space in Cairo is as much about keeping disadvantaged and vulnerable groups ‘in their place’ within the social order as about restoring stability.

Egypt in the balance: what the blogs are saying, 25 January 2016

On the fifth anniversary of Egypt’s uprising: a range of opinions in articles and tweets, first and foremost from the people of Egypt.

The hidden triumph of the Egyptian revolution

A message to the revolutionaries of Egypt: you can no longer recognise your pre-2011 self.

Five years on, has the revolution failed?

It is still too soon to judge the outcomes of such a profound and wide-ranging global upheaval. عربي

The fateful marriage: political violence and violence against women

Pervasive and diverse, instances of violence against women can only be fully comprehended in the political contexts that give them purpose and meaning.

Mona Eltahawy and sexual revolution in the Middle East

'Traumatised into feminism,' Mona Eltahawy speaks of her decision to unveil and understanding that 'Muslim women’s bodies are the medium upon which culture is engraved, be it through headscarves or cutting.'

Between Trump and Baghdadi

Maged Mandour

Backwards looking politics is a malaise affecting both the west and east. It breeds violence as global elites clamber to maintain their grip on power.

 

The fascist history of Egypt’s revolution

Questioning revolutionaries’ conventional narrative of the January 25 revolution is the only way for Egypt to move forward.

Fearful of protests, Egypt keeps stadia closed

The government's decision to keep stadia closed is a rejection of the demands of some of its key supporters in the business community—as well as those of Al Ahly and Al Zamalek team fan groups.

After the Paris attacks, what role for reforming education in the Middle East?

Recent terrorist attacks are an opportunity to push for crucial curriculum and educational reforms in Egypt and the Muslim world. 

The revival Nasserism in El Sisi’s Egypt

Maged Mandour

The selective revival of Nasserism by Egypt's current regime may help expand its support base amongst the masses, but only temporarily, as living standards continue to deteriorate.

The photojournalist who ‘damaged Egyptian national unity’

Shawkan, an Egyptian photojournalist, has had his detention extended yet again. His camera has been as cold as the regime currently ruling Egypt - locking up anyone and everyone on no grounds at all.

The Day You Catch the Fish: speaking out on domestic abuse

Violence is manifested in so many ways, yet it is always the violence that comes within the domestic space that leaves many women silenced, especially when the violence leaves no physical scars.

Why the west cannot defeat ISIS

Maged Mandour

ISIS has emerged from the wounds of the Arab world—for which the west is to a large extent responsibleand current airstrikes are pouring salt into these wounds.

Government failure to upgrade informal settlements in Egypt: a brief history

Is civil administration and planning in Egypt being run professionally according to research and analysis, or is it as ‘random’ as the housing it claims to improve?

Window on the Middle East - November 20, 2015

Arab Awakening's columnists offer their perspective on what is happening on the ground in the Middle East. 

Cairo landscapes: a battle over history

The reworking of urban spaces embodying the collective memory of the January 25 uprising is not a novelty, but part and parcel of the state's attempt to rewrite the history of the revolution.

Normalising bloodshed: education and the dreams of the Marshall

What are the people in Egypt forcing themselves to believe in order not to deal with the harsh realities of the past four years – let alone the years before?

Update: Egypt’s Hossam Bahgat released from military intelligence

The award-winning journalist was released after being held for interrogation, sparking an outcry from local and international rights organisations.

From Mubarak to Sisi: the end of liberal autocracy

Maged Mandour

Unlike during the Mubarak era, the current regime lacks a reliable civilian ally to populate the legislative branch of the state.

 

Egyptian journalist under military interrogation for “harming national security”

Prominent journalist and rights activist Hossam Bahgat faces military trial in Egypt for his investigative journalism.

Red carpets for everyone? Cameron ought to tackle Sisi on human rights

We can expect the PM to talk to Egypt's president about trade and security—but what about disappearances, detentions, and stifled dissent?

Social media is still powerful in Egypt

Mina Fayek

Could social media help build another uprising soon?

 

Anti-colonialism, grassroots nationalism and their impacts on international relations in Egypt

How do uprisings and national discourses in Egypt shape the international relations of the country? How are we to understand the current state of Egyptian nationalism and its relationship with the Arab world post-2011?

The pillage of Egypt by Sisi and Britain Inc.

The twisted logic of this system protects the socialisation of the Egyptian economy in favour of a military clique, whilst condoning the wholesale imprisonment of its capitalists.  

Why almost nobody participated in the Egyptian parliamentary elections

Awaited for more than two years, the first round of parliamentary elections in Egypt has bluntly confirmed the widespread disillusion of many voters about the country's political system.

The fragmentation of power in the Arab world

Maged Mandour

Many Arab countries seem to have reverted to a mode of power reminiscent of a pre-modern form of politics, where coercion is the sole source of power.


Cognitive dissonance in Egypt

Mina Fayek

The Egyptian regime tries to show the world an image of respect for freedoms and rights while widely violating them.

 

Your fatwa does not apply here

The UN Human Rights Council has appointed Karima Bennoune as Special Rapporteur in the field of Cultural Rights. Bennoune is the author of the book, Your Fatwa Does Not Apply Here: Untold Stories from the Fight Against Muslim Fundamentalism.

Egypt: pardon evokes frustration rather than celebration

Think about the thousands who are held in prison, with or without charge, with or without trials, who are not getting the exposure necessary to make their release a political win for Sisi. 

Breaking boundaries

Aliyah Tarek

The youth of Egypt are changing, but are these new attitudes temporary, or have they penetrated on a deeper level that can transform the next generation?

'Something wicked this way comes': the Arab transitions (part 1)

An excerpt from a NOREF report on the background to the current situation in the Middle East, focusing on the aftermath of the 'Arab Spring'. Part one: North Africa, Egypt and the Gulf.

Arms sales to Egypt: when rhetoric overtakes reality

It is impossible to show solidarity with the people of Egypt while arming and supporting the tyranny oppressing them, but this is the hypocrisy at the heart of western foreign policy.

Terrorist slippery slope

The UK government should look to what is happening to free expression in Egypt and Turkey before broadening terrorist laws to include those who "spread hate".

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