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Constitutional conventions: best practice

How Charlie Gard became a cause célèbre for the US Christian right

“Charlie’s Army never sleeps”: the case of British child Charlie Gard and the growing power and global reach of American conservative activists and “pro-family” organisers.

Too many Afghan women in London face racism, sexism – and unwanted pregnancies

Recent research on Afghan immigrant women in London has revealed a multi-layered crisis. What can be done to address this, and to empower them?

Gertrude Bell: the tragedy of her letters from Baghdad

A remarkable new documentary assembled from Gertrude Bell's letters read over archive footage makes us wish for what might have been

The EU is the real protector of national identities

A northern European who has long made their home in England reflects from Austria on the odd unease that the English still have with expressions of national identity

Ireland, Brexit and our Disunited Kingdom

Will Brexit ultimately result in a united federal Ireland in a confederation with Scotland, in the EU – with England and Wales outside it?

How to improvise with refugees

Borderline, a new play by Sophie Besse about - and with a cast of - refugees represents an ideal of being together

Lost childhoods: age disputes in the UK asylum system

Children seeking asylum in the UK are regularly disbelieved about how old they are and can end up facing harmful, protracted disputes. The culture of disbelief so often criticised in the Home Office has now seeped into some local authorities.

“Enviemos a la Gran Bretaña a América del Sur“

En una muestra del humor británico más ácido, y parodiando una campaña sobre el Brexit que ha resultado insultante para muchos ciudadanos británicos, la Campaña “#VoteMove” le pone una sonrisa a una decisión dramática para todos. English

Our outsourced, shadow state

The outsourcing of public services to private contractors has transformed the state. What has gone wrong, why and what can be done?  A review of "Shadow State" by Alan White.

To hell in a handcart

The comforts of pessimism are to be found in an illusion of control

Education worth thinking about

The latest Green Paper in the UK on higher education puts ‘Student Choice’ as a top policy objective. But are there real choices for those who believe in “education for education’s sake”?

The making of an open and democratic Europe: reading Brexit through E.P. Thompson

There is no room for Britain’s turning away from Europe to a fantasy mid-Atlantic or neo-Commonwealth position of the kind floated, typically unseriously, by Boris Johnson and Michael Gove.

Bike courier in London: the messenger is the medium

A review of Julian Sayarer's new book, "Messengers". A cog in the wheel of the global information economy, this courier allows the City to deliver its true message of redemption to him. 

Child sexual abuse: failing another generation of children?

The Office of the Children’s Commissioner reveals that in England 1.3 million will suffer sexual abuse in their childhood. What’s it going to do about this most secret of crimes?

Corbyn versus Snark

Bob Dylan provides a sound-track for Britains' liberal commentariat post-Corbyn: "something is happening here, but you don’t know what it is, do you, Mister Jones?”

Who's afraid of the 'global poor'?

Shifting the migration debate to consider the impact of global phenomena such as climate change and global capitalism on the movement of people requires an understanding of scarcity and insecurity as factors which affect citizens and non-citizens alike.

Is Corbyn too pally with tyrants and other pariahs?

Why is it so hard for the left, both pro and anti-Corbyn, to resist the logic of "my enemies' enemies are my friends"? Can we learn to cast a plague on the houses of enemies of progress whoever they are?

Re-imagining England

Originally delivered as a public lecture at the University of Winchester on Thursday 9th October, 2014, John Denham reflects on the future of England and "Englishness."

Liberty, Equality, Fraternity ... and welfare

How do the political camps map their favourite welfare policies onto political values? A report from the Ax:son Johnson Foundation seminar on the future of the welfare state

Trident: weak defence

The Conservative-led government of austerity Britain is facing the sacrifice of its sacred cow of high military spending—to preserve the even more precious elephant in the room: the UK’s ‘independent’ nuclear weapon.

A green and pleasant land? The trauma of the British asylum system

The system of asylum in the UK pushes mental fortitude to its limits. 

Multilateralism: is the end in sight?

The P5 process was a British attempt to spark multilateral nuclear disarmament. It should no longer be accepted as an excuse for inaction.  

12 mph politics - the conversation

Breaking records, hospitality, racism, poverty, globalisation and two concepts of hope ... the film of an evening of conversation around "Life Cycles", Julian Sayarer's account of his record-breaking cycling circumnavigation of the globe

Diagnosing the daily poison

We must see the tabloid right as a target in the battle for a better society.

Response to "'Whose University?’ dislodges Cambridge University's mask of humanity"

The claims of the "Whose University" campaign are ill-informed and tendentious.

"Whose University?" dislodges Cambridge University's mask of humanity

At universities across Britain, business interests are increasingly promoted over the welfare of students. 

Trident: a liability the UK can ill afford to keep

If Scotland votes yes for independence this week, the chances of the UK having to disarm its nuclear arsenal rise dramatically–and the global non-proliferation regime needs just such a shot in the arm. But even a close no vote should be cause for reassessment over the future of Trident.

Are the heart and the mind really a battlefield?

Isaac and Isaiah by David Caute and Sweet Tooth by Ian McEwan - tales of how Cold Warriors failed to capture hearts and minds - contain an important lesson for our battle against extremist Jihadis.

Would Scotland's nationalists disarm Trident?

The renewal of the “independent British nuclear deterrent” has met remarkably little debate in the UK. Except in Scotland, that is.

Syria and Gaza: a false equivalency

Though the indiscriminate violence in Syria and Gaza is becoming indistinguishable, unlike Syria, the west can take relatively simple measures to end the war on Gaza. 

Mazí Mas, “with us”

Women have played a seminal role in keeping food cultures all over the world alive. Nikandre Kopcke discusses her inspiration for setting up a pop-up restaurant which showcases the culinary talents and diverse cultural heritages of migrant women in London.

The Scottish referendum: a chance to challenge our nuclear assumptions?

The removal of nuclear weapons from Scottish soil may be a “red-line” issue for the SNP today, but as the complexity of other defining issues - currency, European Union membership, national debt - begins to surface, this “red-line” may well evolve into a bargaining chip.

The Labour Party's real challenge is finding a radical voice

Will the UK Labour Party ever really, vocally resist Conservative policies? They should be engaging young voters on global social inequality.

Demand homes not jails: queer homelessness is being criminalized

Cities globally are starting to criminalize homelessness: banning begging and making free food provision illegal. I work within LGBTQ communities, whose multiple oppressions lead to a high level of homelessness. When I see police disrupting rough sleepers, I remember their life stories.

Benefits Street: how austerity transformed makeover TV

Benefits Street was born from coalition government rhetoric: no one should receive 'anything for nothing'. The failure to transform is always personal. Nobody should be helped.

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