This week's editor

Heather McRobie

Heather McRobie is an editor at 5050.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

A very European coup

This is why Syriza's negotiating strategy has to play to the European gallery and not just to the suits in the conference room. The aim is to persuade people to put pressure on their own governments or change them in the coming elections.

Where is another Europe now?

Europe either hangs together or - as the American revolutionaries liked to point out - the nations of Europe will be hanged separately.

SYRIZA provides an opportunity that is only given once in every generation

Nick Dearden, director of Global Justice Now, discusses debt cancellation, EU reform and what a Syriza victory means for the anti-austerity movement in Europe.

Press-clipping the Tsipras-Putin meeting: the early impressions

How did the Greek press react to the recent Tsipras-Putin meeting in Moscow?

Of Trojan horses and realpolitik: The Tsipras-Putin meeting and its broader implications

Today Alexis Tsipras will sit down in Moscow for talks with Vladimir Putin. This meeting has been dogged by controversy and has led many to wonder: what exactly do Russia and Greece hope to gain from this encounter?

The European Union and the radical Left

What should the attitude of the European Union be towards the rise of the radical Left?

The last of the Papandreous?

During elections for change - and the first Greek Parliament for 92 years without a Papandreou in it - Adam Ramsay spoke with former scion of the Greek ruling class, George Papandreou.

The good, the bad and the ugly: when SYRIZA meets Europe

The EU has shown three simultaneous faces to Greece: ‘the good, the bad and the ugly’, to use a cinematic metaphor, all of them with the same message but with a different delivery package

Europe in a labyrinth and the material power of ideas

The Greek government has the mandate to revive the idea of solidarity and social justice, but also the idea of the economy itself.

Greece's Brest-Litovsk

SYRIZA’s leadership claims that the putative dilemma between war and peace, or between exiting austerity and staying in the Euro, is not exhaustive. The third possibility is neither war nor peace.

Athens, a flourishing polis

Amid the crisis, the Athens city council won the Bloomberg Philanthropy sustainable development and EFTA solidarity awards. 

Brazil: the nonchalant protester?

With Brazil on the brink of recession, it's not hard to compare the country's looming financial collapse with that of Greece, as the country is following in Greece’s pre-crisis footsteps in quite a few ways.

What's in a game?

After Tony Curzon Price argued that Greece was not playing chicken and James Galbraith retorted that it's not even playing a game, an applied game theorist reminds us of the logic, in Greece's game, of claiming you're not playing one.

The trouble with SYRIZA

Despite being 'a man of the Left', and despite being hugely critical of the parties that ruled the country since 1974, there are several things about the rise of SYRIZA that absolutely terrify me.

Europe adjusting the noose around its neck

Steadfast, chins high, and completely oblivious to the momentous changes happening around it, the ossified political mainstream of Europe is marching towards the abyss.

'Germanies' in lieu of Europe

Mr. Schäuble remains convinced that the peoples of Europe have given a mandate for financial austerity, which is favored by the German government. What gives Mr. Schäuble such certainty?

No bolt from the blue: the hidden roots of the Eurozone crisis

Crucial aspects on the origins and the dynamic of the crisis are regularly concealed. This leads to a rather distorted view of the real disaster the European Union is facing today.

A Great German Greek Grexit Game?

Curzon Price is clearly right that the “game” is not “chicken.” It is not zero-sum. But the real question is, is it a game?

The Greek Game: Dominance or Chicken, Fear or Reason?

The outcome of the Greek game depends on how Syriza sees itself in two possible futures: "Exit" or "Buckle"

Economic egoism and liberal dogma

By reducing European solidarity to a question of rules, Germany has become a problem for the European Union.

A tennis court oath for Europe

Europe has historically been a beacon of political experimentation. Has it now become structurally unfit for change? 

Stand in solidarity with the struggle of the Greek people

I ask you to stand in solidarity with the just struggle of the Greek people, which is also the struggle of every citizen. Our people have been asked to go hungry to bail out debts created by a wealthy minority, not just in the country but internationally.

How European Union switchboard "demoicracy" works

The complexity of the changing nation-state under the duress of globalization is currently snagged on a simplistic drive to fast-forward the past, driven by the desire to stay local.

Why does Germany insist on a failed programme for Greece?

The elephant in the recent Eurogroup meeting room was Greece's 2010 failed structural readjustment programme, admonished by Yanis Varoufakis as 'fiscal waterboarding'. Why does Germany persist in defending it?

Greece and the eurogroup: capitulation or breaching austerity's dam?

George Papandreou cancelling his referendum was a capitulation. Tsipras and Varoufakis achieving new space and flexibility and four months to achieve a genuinely new approach was quite an achievement.

Syriza's limited options

Unless Syriza changes its rhetoric now and unless it explains the facts about the EU and the economy, it will be incapable of justifying any of these decisions to its voters several months down the line.

Should we worry about Syriza’s new nationalist rhetoric?

In the lead up to the election, and especially since forming a coalition with the Independent Greeks, Syriza's rhetoric has adopted an increasingly nationalistic tone. What does this mean for discourse in Greece and anti-austerity politics in Europe?

Is a socialist EU possible via left-wing populist parties such as Syriza, Podemos and the HDP?

Syriza still needs to build a strong hegemonic culture to include the non-leftist progressive movement and to expand the bloc beyond class politics to gain the consent of society at large.

Challenging the red lines of Greece

Yanis Varoufakis has said that he does not intend to back down from his rather high “red lines”. European leaders, and especially German finance minister Wolfgang Schäuble, are currently exploring just how true that is.

The Varoufakis game is not chicken

The FT thinks Greece is playing chicken. In fact, it's in a dominant position.

Syriza and the rise of a radical left in Europe: solidarity is the keyword

The key protagonist in channelling bottom-up solidarity proved to be – not for the first time in Greece’s history - the institution of the extended family.

Not so strange ideological bedfellows: Syriza and the Independent Greeks

As the European Commission sets the limits of economic policy all over Europe, it becomes increasingly difficult to think of economic issues independent of the question of EU integration.

Greece's migration policy: what's next?

The election of Syriza brings hope to those who have been fighting for an ethical migration policy in one of Europe's least immigrant-friendly states.

False dilemmas: a critical guide to the Greek debt crisis

Amongst all the cacophony, it is important to look back at the bailouts. All but approximately 11% of the bailout money has ended up in creditors' pockets.

The gardener, the grapes and the thorns: the backbone of Europe's future

Populism is now in an orbit of frontal collision with European and national institutions of democracy as developed today, demanding a reinvigoration of 'popular sovereignty.'

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