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This week’s front page editor

Adam Bychawski

Adam Bychawski is an editorial assistant at openDemocracy.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Climate change will kill my generation, unless we step up now

Ireland has the necessary means to invest in cleaner energy and should be flying way beyond our self-set climate accord measures, yet we continually fail them.  

Brexiteers, backstops, and the bloody Irish border

How casually the Brexiteers dismiss the issues around the Irish border and the peace process. But for many, they can never be forgotten. 

The Backlash podcast episode 5: targeted hate

Social media propaganda. Data-mining. Foreign interference in Ireland's abortion referendum. The backlash against our rights goes online.

Hablemos de lo que implica no tener acceso a un aborto seguro

Este año algo ha cambiado en la forma en que hablamos del aborto. Se puede sentir en la calle, en Twitter, en los medios de comunicación… Algo ha pasado y ya no hay marcha atrás. English

Listen England, it is Ireland talking

Brexit is fuelled by an English nationalism as crude and self-deluded as Irish nationalism used to be. The best response is to follow Ireland's journey to an inclusive, pluralist vision of patriotism.

'A historic victory for women's rights': how the world responded to Ireland's abortion referendum

Media from the UK to Argentina react to the results of Friday’s vote, laying the path to legislation for safe abortion services for Irish women.

MPs criticise Facebook’s “not fit for purpose” foreign ad ban as Ireland votes on abortion

British and Irish parliamentarians call for major changes to unregulated social media campaigning following openDemocracy revelations – but too late for Friday’s historic vote.

Six ways Ireland’s abortion referendum could be hacked this week

Anti-abortion money, Facebook ads and boots-on-the-ground volunteers have piled in from across the world to try and swing Friday’s historic vote. Will they succeed?

How Irish anti-abortion activists are drawing on Brexit and Trump campaigns to influence referendum

Backlash against Irish abortion rights enlists some of the same technologies, companies, and individuals involved in controversial Trump and Brexit campaigns.

Honourable deceptions in the choreography of the Northern Ireland Peace Process

In some situations, the end does justify the means. In these anti-political times isn't it useful to remember the positive role political actors can play in making the world a better place?

Tapping the will of the people – a route to radically better democracy?

Ireland's innovative Citizen Assembly is changing the way the country debates sensitive issues like abortion. What else could it achieve?

On the warpath: the young women leading Ireland’s campaign against abortion

Next year Ireland will hold a referendum on its controversial eighth amendment. Articulate, millennial “pro-life feminists” are leading the charge against reproductive rights.

Ireland, Brexit and our Disunited Kingdom

Will Brexit ultimately result in a united federal Ireland in a confederation with Scotland, in the EU – with England and Wales outside it?

Dublin’s housing: a cultural revolution

Home Sweet Home is a radical and highly creative campaign to force political action on Dublin homelessness; a revolutionary criticism of Ireland’s broken housing market, booms, busts and corruption.

Repeal the Eighth: putting intersectionality into practice

A long-established conservative media frames the terms of abortion politics in Ireland. The pro-choice activism challenges dominant discourses with the inclusivity and diversity of the movement demonstrating intersectionality in practice.

The problem with politicians and democracy…

"Opening up new forms of political participation to hear the voices of the politically marginalised is critical for the well being of our polity." Interview for the World Forum for Democracy 2016.

We need bolder politicians

“We have seen a lengthy period during which politicians have deliberately disengaged from important aspects of what they should be doing, leading to a lot of disillusionment with politics.”

The rise of the far-right in Westminster as Brexit looms

A victorious ‘Leave’ vote, vindicating a campaign driven by xenophobia and clearing the path for far-right domination of British politics, could mark a shift towards hyper-nationalist policies across further member states.

Today’s People of the Abyss

Is the book a time capsule from a bygone era from which we can learn ‘how it was’ rather than ‘how it is today’?

Irish general election to provide more of same?

As Ireland’s delicate recovery shuffles on, many Irish voters will support the government for lack of a credible alternative.

A realignment of Irish politics?

On February 26 the Irish people take to the polls for the first general election since 2011.

Austerity Ireland: Europe open your eyes

Europe must stop lauding Ireland as a success story and instead recognise the damage done to Irish society by the harsh austerity politics inflicted upon her.

The poisoned chalice

Part two of the insider view of negotiations between Greece and the Eurogroup. When is a rescue not a rescue but a seizure of assets? Interview.

Criminalising asylum-seeking in Ireland: the case of Walli Ullah Safi

The harsh institutional approach to asylum seeking in Ireland is indicative of a mentality that places a severe and punitive burden of proof upon the asylum seeker.

Sexual politics in Ireland

If marriage depended on the exclusion of gay love, then its inclusion fundamentally shakes its core function for patriarchy.

Europe adjusting the noose around its neck

Steadfast, chins high, and completely oblivious to the momentous changes happening around it, the ossified political mainstream of Europe is marching towards the abyss.

Why the Irish political elite is terrified of Syriza

The Irish political elite is deeply invested in an essentially religious narrative: Ireland sinned, Ireland confessed, Ireland did penance, Ireland has been forgiven, Ireland will be rewarded. If Syriza's strategy in Greece succeeds, this will be exposed as a folly.

Abortion: Ireland's reckoning with Amendment 8

Calling for an end to a constitution that bans abortion - and kills women, a deep and broad based movement has sprung up in Ireland to change the constitution, and finally release women's bodies from church and state.

Rethinking citizenship: revisiting the 2004 Irish Citizenship Referendum a decade later

In June 2004, the Irish electorate voted to remove automatic entitlement to birthright citizenship (jus soli), which had been in place since the foundation of the Irish state. The government argued that the children of migrant parents did not have ‘sufficient connections’ to Ireland to take up citizenship in this way.

The historic visit of Irish President Michael D. Higgins to the UK

It provided a rare attempt to ‘reconstruct self-other relations making possible a conversation of equal but different cultures’.

The inevitable rise of Sinn Fein

In the aftermath of austerity in Ireland, the Labour party has seen itself virtually wiped out while Sinn Fein has continued to rise.

Sex workers in democratic societies

While there are certainly gendered imbalances in the actual structures of current sex markets, these imbalances are created, reinforced and strengthened not by sex work itself but by laws criminalizing sex work and by treating sex workers as second-class citizens without rights.

What can the case for Scottish Independence learn from the Irish example?

The nationalist movement developed in the two countries at about the same time, in the late nineteenth century, gathering momentum in a campaign for Home Rule in the years leading up to World War I, only to be stalled by the outbreak of war.

Why are the Irish not resisting austerity?

It has become a cliché to compare the passivity of the Irish in the face of the Troika’s brutal austerity programme with the active resistance of the Spanish or the Greek. Yet, the Irish are challenging austerity in their own way.

A dialogue on ‘barriers’ to participation and capitalist temporalities

Coming together can make it possible to live more and work less. Doing things collectively is the only way we can be free from the obligation to work so hard as self-exploiting individuals. This is not primarily a question of politics or protest.

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