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This week's editor

Rosemary Belcher-2.jpg

Rosemary Bechler is openDemocracy’s Editor.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Who broke the Syria ceasefire?

Rely on the UK media for your information about Syria, and you probably think it was Russia and Assad. Here is what goes unreported.

Erdogan’s unexpected ally

By failing to condemn ongoing human rights violations in Turkey, the Council of Europe Secretary General betrays the regional human rights system he is supposed to promote. Originally published on 1 September 2016, updated September 6.

Putin’s opposition in Hungary

Activism and the retreat to digital niches actually increases the system-conformity of Orbán’s opposition, just as it does in Putin’s Russia.

Fighting the politics of confusion

Post-factualism and incoherent political narratives are the right's new anti-opposition strategy — here’s what we must do.

Iran’s military objectives in Syria and Russia’s contradictory positions

As the US and Russia speak of a mutual agreement over Syria, Iran and Assad are continuing their ruthless slaughtering of the Syrian people.

The role of the EU in the Syrian conflict

As a new round of Geneva talks is under way, the EU should ensure that the outcome is not merely the result of US and Russian talks.

Dutch popular rejection of the EU-Ukraine Association Agreement: a self-inflicted wound

For everybody who knows a bit about the EU, the nationwide, expensive and low-turnout Dutch plebiscite on this EU-Ukraine contract looks in itself rather odd.

Ending impunity in Europe?

The International Criminal Court needs support in order to succeed with its investigation of Georgia and Russia.

Silence – the EU’s strategy for human rights abuses in its neighbourhood

Talk in Brussels among non-governmental organisations and parliamentarians is that the EU lacks a strategy to address human rights violations in the European neighbourhood. However, what if the EU has a strategy?

Book Review: Sasha Sokolov’s ‘A School for Fools’

A Soviet underground classic is back in print. In a school for fools, fighting conformity requires confronting the Soviet system—and our inner demons.



Hans Blix – a diplomatic life

Hans Blix ponders his long career in international politics and diplomacy, the state of the Middle East, and why he is an advocate for nuclear power. Interview.

Russia's politics of paranoia

Russian society tries to keep its nerve. The Kremlin thrives on it, the papers amplify it—but nobody can quite control this profound paranoia.

Four points from Putin's press conference

Putin's latest press conference saw a tacit admission of Russian forces in Ukraine and a denial that their presence was ever denied. Here are a few other points you may have missed. 

These hills are ours

In Bashkortostan, the hills are alive with the sound of limestone quarrying. Now local civil society is taking on one of Russia’s largest chemical consortia. Русский

Conflicting interests in crowded skies prolong Syria’s agony

Turkey-Russia spat is a symptom of different, often incompatible agendas.

Russia’s policy in the Middle East imperilled by the Syrian intervention

This risky experiment in power projection continues traditional Russian policy in the region, but also departs from the careful manoeuvring aimed at exploiting confusion in US and European policies.  

Erdoğan and Putin: unalike likeness

The leaders of Turkey and Russia are often compared. But their differences are more instructive than their similarities.

(This article was first published on 22 November 2014)

Why the west cannot defeat ISIS

Maged Mandour

ISIS has emerged from the wounds of the Arab world—for which the west is to a large extent responsibleand current airstrikes are pouring salt into these wounds.

If ISIS uses chemical weapons, the west will be partly responsible

How can the international community respond effectively and promptly to this growing threat, not just to the Middle East region, but to the world?

Women, peace and security: the UN's rhetoric-reality gap

UN Security Council resolution 2242 passed with overwhelming support. but effective implementation was immediately called into question when the Russian Ambassador then spoke out against the resolution’s key provisions.

Smooth censorship in Russia

Everybody understands everything, everybody knows everything, and no one says anything aloud.

Memetic engineering: conspiracies, viruses and historical agency

Ideas, just like viruses or organisms, do not spontaneously generate, even if certain historical circumstances make the rise and spread of a given idea more likely.

Putin’s partition plans and the politics of cynicism

Russian military involvement appears to be increasingly focused on propping up the Assad regime, contributing to a partitioned Syria in which Russia establishes a firm foothold on the eastern Mediterranean.

Could ISIS bring Russia and the west together?

For a couple of years after 9/11, there was a solid US-Russia anti-terrorism cooperation that basically gave the Kremlin a freer hand in crushing the Chechens.

Cold war conspiracies and suspect polio prevention

Many American scientists distrusted the Russian field trials. Russian colleagues responded with a sentiment similar to Sting’s Cold War hit: the Russians love their children too.

Oleg Sentsov and Aleksandr Kolchenko: prisoners of conscience

Statement on the sentencing of Ukrainian filmmaker Oleg Sentsov and co-defendant Aleksandr Kolchenko.

The ‘window of life’ in Kirov

In the Russian city of Kirov, local authorities recently closed down a scheme to rescue unwanted newborn babies after just four days. We speak to the women and priest involved. на русском языке

Film review: ‘Grozny Blues’ (dir. Nicola Bellucci)

Grozny Blues is a haunting, often dreamlike documentary about Chechen people caught between the contradictory pressures of manufactured realities and coerced silences.

Book review: Alisa Ganieva, 'The Mountain and the Wall'

The Mountain and the Wall is the first Dagestani novel to be published in English. Ganieva is very courageous to write about what is happening in her native country, thinly veiled in the traditional Russian literary use of fiction.


North Ossetia is rethinking its role as Russia's ‘outpost’ in the Caucasus

From ‘outpost’ to ‘outpostism’ and then to ‘outposter’, North Ossetians are feeling increasingly alienated from the Russian centre.

Book review: Mikhail Shishkin, 'Calligraphy Lesson'

‘Only art is capable of creating moments where our “unreal”, mortal time intersects with its “real” counterpart,’ says Shishkin.


Remembering Budyonnovsk

I was in Budyonnovsk on 14 June 1995, when Chechen separatists raided the town and took hostages, killing 129. Twenty years later, this town in southern Russia is still known as the 'town of black shawls'. 

A ’different’ commemoration of Russia’s Victory Day: reporting from Thessaloniki, Greece (9 May 2015)

Does the ostentatious celebration of Russia's victory in the Great Patriotic War, which took place in Thessaloniki last week, tell us anything about the state of Russophilia in Greece?

What Russian students learn about Russia’s enemies

Conspiracy theories have permeated Russia’s education space, where they are intended not only to shape knowledge but to secure the political loyalty of Russia’s youth.


Of Trojan horses and realpolitik: The Tsipras-Putin meeting and its broader implications

Today Alexis Tsipras will sit down in Moscow for talks with Vladimir Putin. This meeting has been dogged by controversy and has led many to wonder: what exactly do Russia and Greece hope to gain from this encounter?

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