only search openDemocracy.net

This week's editor

Dawn Foster, Co-Editor

Dawn Foster is Co-Editor at 5050 and a freelance journalist.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Watching Labour: a European perspective

How is the Labour leadership contest being viewed from Europe?

Arms sales to Egypt: when rhetoric overtakes reality

It is impossible to show solidarity with the people of Egypt while arming and supporting the tyranny oppressing them, but this is the hypocrisy at the heart of western foreign policy.

Terrorist slippery slope

The UK government should look to what is happening to free expression in Egypt and Turkey before broadening terrorist laws to include those who "spread hate".

Rough waters ahead for Scotland if the UK votes 'no' in EU referendum

If David Cameron's EU referendum gamble fails and the UK votes 'no', what then for Scotland? Will it be smooth sailing to being an independent country in the European Union or tough battles with London and Brussels?

1984 revisited

As a Lib Dem MP, I discovered just how close Britain is to Orwell's dystopian vision, where the state has incredible powers to monitor everything we do. 

David Cameron’s hypocrisy on Muslim radicalization

If Cameron was serious about countering extremism, what better person to allow into the UK than Jeenah, who has much to say about the contributions of the west to the problem?

European values and the Arab world

Maged Mandour

EU politicians can promote 'European' values by stopping their support for autocratic regimes, and by starting to ask tough questions about radicalisation.


Jeremy Corbyn: Labour’s gift to British women?

Jeremy Corbyn's Working with Women policy document has been well received by feminists, but the silence on the intersectionality of religious fundamentalism and women’s oppression, and on prostitution, raises questions.

Jeremy Corbyn and women’s experiences of austerity

Jeremy Corbyn’s bid for Labour Party leadership may also mean that the damage of austerity, particularly to women, is finally being recognised. 

Women post-recession: moving towards insecurity

After the recession, the rise in casual and precarious contracts is entrenching gender inequality in the UK.

The UK's EU referendum and the EU's legitimacy crisis

"Is a UK that retreats in isolationist but somehow progressive splendour really feasible? Surely, European countries must cooperate in the face of the deep challenges and opportunities we face."

Which is more likely: a progressive Brexit or a progressive Europe?

EU institutions and socio-economic policies are hopelessly anti-democratic, inducing a current of deep nihilism across the continent. But don't be fooled: a progressive Brexit is deeply unlikely.

Enduring civilisation, enduring empire?

The "Indigenous Australia: enduring civilisation" exhibition at the British Museum leads to the overarching question of who is authorised and best equipped to tell the story of the artefacts displayed, and on whose terms.

Towards Plan F: planning for a feminist economy in the UK

Feminists must reject mainstream austerity rhetoric and challenge politicians to adopt an alternative 'Plan F' to bring about equality between women and men on the basis of a caring and sustainable economy.

It's gettin’ kinda hectic

With a few hundred years of colonial rule under its belt, the British state has mastered the art of psychological intimidation, and that’s why they use it.

The left returns to an old love – saying No to Europe

It is the politics of Europe’s current rulers that must be challenged, not the UK’s membership of the EU.

Why I'm leaving London

“My family is moving to Los Angeles in two weeks. Many Londoners understand intuitively why we're going.”

‘Love where you live’, and other lies of gentrification

Let’s admit that gentrification is an immoral urban process. It is a deliberate policy of social engineering and needs to be tackled at its source.

Moving beyond the squares: anticipating the debate

On July 3-4, the LSE will jointly host a seminar with openDemocracy on the impact of the movements in the squares from 2011 onwards. Do they contribute to the democratic renewal of our democracies and if so how? A conversation.

Migrant women in the UK: settling for rather than settling in

Women with a high level of educational qualifications who migrate to the UK to join their British husbands are finding the path to employment strewn with obstacles.

Straightening Europe’s crooked timber into a democratic eurozone

Opposition to the direction of the Eurozone can be expressed through national democracies, for example through the election of Syriza, but this is now an inadequate form of political representation.

500 Eritreans

"We need justice, we need freedom”. Their voices were raised in unison, echoing off the striking architecture of Liverpool's docks as they marched quickly and determinedly through the streets.  

There they must no further go

Andrew Kötting’s film By Our Selves retraces a four-day walk made by the poet John Clare: “start moving and the path reveals itself”. At the Open City Documentary Festival on 20 June 2015.

Analysing Aaronovitch: a sceptical narrative

Prosecution and conviction rates for sexual crime are lamentably low in the UK. If David Aaronovitch cares about 'genuine abuse', why isn't this what worries him more? Part Two.

Analysing Aaronovitch: has the scourge of ‘conspiracists’ become one himself?

David Aaronovitch claims ‘unbelievable’ notions about child abuse that ‘bewitched’ professionals decades ago are echoed in the VIP historic abuse cases. Where is his evidence? Part One.

Relationship remembered

Andrea Luka Zimmerman’s film Estate, a Reverie, is an unruly celebration of extraordinary everyday humanity. At the Open City Documentary Festival on 21 June 2015.

Estate of mind

Andrea Luka Zimmerman’s film Estate, a Reverie is a moving documentation of what gentrification really means to those affected by it. At the Open City Documentary Festival on 21 June 2015.

Building cultural citizenship with women seeking refuge and asylum

Using participatory, biographical and visual methods, we got in touch with women’s ‘realities’ in a way that demanded critical reflection.

Heysel: 30 years on

A reflection on the thirtieth anniversary of the Heysel Stadium disaster - one of football's worst tragedies.

Special deal, root and branch reform or Brexit? Cameron’s EU-policy - a sceptical view from Germany

The concessions which Britain will be granted today in negotiations with Brussels and Berlin may well turn out to be self defeating in the long run, because they will marginalise Britain. 

UK border agents in the house of God

Immigration officers are now being placed in religious institutions.  It may not be too farfetched to ask: how long before we’re forced to wear our immigration status on our sleeves?

UK nuclear weapons: a source of insecurity?

The UK doggedly maintains an ‘independent nuclear deterrent’ but a naval officer has blown the whistle on the system’s inherent insecurity—with its potentially incalculable implications.

Who has the right to live in London? An interview with Renters’ Rights London

Renters’ Rights London aims to provide the tools and knowledge renters need to defend themselves from unfair treatment and campaign for more rights. We speak with coordinator, Rosie Walker.

Deficits in the EU that should worry Europeans

In Greece for the first time the EU authorities demand a government complete a programme that it has neither designed nor has a democratic mandate to implement.

The future of human rights in the UK

A British Bill of Rights will not only allow the Conservative government to deport an individual to a country where they face a real risk of torture, harm or humiliation: the human rights system must be fought for.

Syndicate content