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Rosemary Bechler is openDemocracy’s Editor.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Postscript to a letter to extremists

We can defeat extremism by building something beautiful together.

The banality of terrorism

Current responses seem to normalise terrorism – cementing it into the everyday reality of daily life, in the same way that we accept poverty, homelessness or inequality. The way things are.

The UK government’s attitude to refugees, then and now

Britain has a history of barbarism towards refugees.

Adding insult to injury: when Israel and Britain celebrate the historical trauma of Palestinians

Palestinians will not be silenced. We will voice our historical testimony and tell our narrative to make sense of the senseless grievances of colonialism.

Brexit and the UK Parliament

It is the role of Parliament, not least by its select committees, to hold the government to account at every stage along the way.

British academia's colourblind problem: an interview with Dr Nicola Rollock

Dr Nicola Rollock, lead author of the award-winning book The Colour of Class: the educational strategies of the Black middle classes, discusses race, equality and education in the UK.

The Sky bid: battle commences

No significant business decision at Sky has ever – ever – been taken without Rupert Murdoch's approval. So what difference might 100% ownership of Sky possibly entail?

A very British tug of war over Europe’s child refugees

Parliament has voted to silence the voices of local communities. Their message of European solidarity and warm welcome for refugees is an anathema to the politics of Brexit Britain.

No Women’s Day without refugee women

Hand-in-hand with Trump, Theresa May is not merely playing to an anti-migrant populist crowd but helped to create it. This system is working as intended, but it must be disrupted.

Responding to Brexit: breaking with neo-liberalism

The last of this series discusses how the damage caused by traditional left and social democratic party embrace of neo-liberal models of globalisation can be repaired, and social democracy reframed.

Responding to Brexit: returning to a social market model on migration

In the second part of the series on key inter-related aspects of the upheaval facing European countries and their citizens: how should the EU tackle the issue of internal migration?

Responding to Brexit: taking the political initiative

This three part series considers key inter-related aspects of the current political upheaval facing the citizens and countries of Europe. This first article examines how the European political class should respond.

Standing on the shoulders of Summerhill School

From the beginning of my work with Summerhill, initially as a fulltime science teacher, I worked with the children to share their experiences with other schools, teachers and universities.

Should domestic abuse have its own law?

In the UK, there is no specific offence for 'domestic violence'. Is the law failing women seeking justice?

Brexit wrecks it: the theory of collective decision making

Basically, political decision-making should not be win-or-lose, as facilitated by the most ancient, primitive, divisive and inaccurate measure of collective opinion ever invented.

In a world of hate, fear and ‘alternative facts’, education really does matter

“It cannot be right, that people can grow up and go to school and hardly ever come into meaningful contact with people from other backgrounds and faiths.” David Cameron, July 2015.

Back to the future: the rebirth of a classical approach to democracy and education in a post-modern society

Education – combined with technologies  – seems to have triggered a sea-change in the contract between government and those who are governed.

I went to a state grammar school but no they are not the answer

Does an 11 year old who has been told they have failed seem to you like someone who is really going to rally behind learning?

Surviving sociology in Egypt and elsewhere

Strangely, although nationalism is a pervasive social phenomenon with immense effects everywhere in the world, it’s not a central preoccupation of sociology or any of the dominant social science disciplines. Interview.

Mind your language

As Marine Le Pen calls on French citizens to renounce dual citizenship in France’s presidential election campaign, bilingual school education is the site of another battle for diversity in Wales.

The bail out industry finds its new crisis opportunity: Brexit

But there seems to be a remarkable level of amnesia about the role many of these same firms played recently in the financial crisis.

Fighting inequality in the UK has to start young

“Universality is key to sustainability and to acceptability of programmes of this kind.  Universal support also reflects our strong belief that parenting skills are not innate and all parents need support.”  

When Black is not the only colour

Too Black for the adoption agencies but not Black enough for the political campaigners.  On growing up an adoptee of mixed heritage in Britain.

Stop Trump – definitely! But then what?

Resisting Trump should involve asking the UK government to reconsider its approach to global security alliances.

The sociology and psychology of xenophobia

In votes for Brexit, and in Trump, we are hearing an indivisible claim for a national, ethnic, gender and class identity. But the claim emerges not from pride, but from shame.

First week of the DiEM25 UK Manifesto Group

How do 57 people write a manifesto?

A false reality has contributed to a new political reality

The descent into complex post-factual politics goes some way to showing why Brexit and Trump were so successful, and their opposition so ineffective. 

The right to have visiting rights

May's not the only one trying to have it both ways. Before Trump’s election, the US, long-heralded (and self-celebrating) “nation of immigrants,” was lowering the lamp beside its golden door.

Working class racism

Following my initial surprise, my first reaction, as always when I encounter the rhetorically inclusive “we”, was to wonder who they might be; was I now part of this “we” ?

A battle for the meaning of British Conservatism

What rescues Conservatives from internecine conflict like that of the Labour Party? Oakeshott claimed that the conservative does not have a creed or doctrine, but rather a ‘disposition’.

UK's Official Secrets Acts overhaul provides little protection for whistleblowers

Whistleblowers who leak official information could be prosecuted and jailed regardless of the public merit of the information they revealed, or whether any damage to national interests was actually caused.

Chilling effects: the politics of anti-semitism in the UK

A former specialist adviser to the House of Commons Social Services Committee has written a detailed critique of the Home Affairs Committee’s Report on anti-Semitism. We find out why.

Palestinian rights and Israel’s agenda

The Israeli government and its supporters need to break out of the prison house of their own thinking by taking a broader and more inclusive view of things. 

State surveillance is a global threat to press freedom

The state should not have the power to secretly identify then persecute whistleblowers.

Brexit, populism and the promise of agency

In a world experienced as one of out-of-control forces, all the more irresistible at the transnational level, how welcome for many would be the promise to reassert control?

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