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This week's editor

“Phoebe

Phoebe Braithwaite is openDemocracy’s submissions editor.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

The Second Amendment and democracy

Could our democracies be on the wane and our rights under attack because we are less willing to take up arms to die and kill for our country?

Why Britons have to embrace tactical voting in the upcoming election

There simply is no heart in a national election; it's tactical voting all the way down

Technology, skills and future jobs

Facing up to the coming technology upheavals, what might a next ‘Golden Age’ look like and what are the enablers that need to be put in place to deliver on that promise?

“You black bastard” Offensive, friendly banter, somewhere in between or both?

“There is no justification for racial discrimination, in theory or in practice, anywhere” and certainly not in Britain or Australia.

RIP United Kingdom, 1927-2017

The Tories maintain the electoral momentum and the political initiative, something which is not only going to damage Labour irreversibly, but the entire country, with Brexit negotiations breaking it apart.

Method in Trump’s madness?

A look at Donald Trump’s 'travel bans' with an eye to the harvesting of personal data, and the EU-US Privacy Shield, now on life support.

From insecurity to insecurity: Black and Ethnic Minority Europeans in the UK

“If all the Europeans leave, who work so hard and they pay taxes, how are they going to manage to keep the benefit system in the first place?”

Human rights after Hitler: and the essential role of the global popular

A timely and groundbreaking book breaks the silence over a little-known UN agency operating between 1943 and 1948, the UNWCC – a key chapter in our war-time experience. Excerpts.

Why is she frit?

What is the British prime minister afraid of?

‘Prevent’, free speech and antisemitism

As a talking point for debate it might be productive. The problem arises from the government of the United Kingdom ‘adopting’ IHRA’s definition of antisemitism in a quasi-official manner.

Dangerous road to divisive places

A review of The Road to Somewhere. The Populist Revolt and the Future of Politics by David Goodhart, London (2017).

Older women living with HIV in the UK: discrimination and broken confidentiality

Women accessing HIV care services in the UK report being told to use separate cutlery, being refused help to shower, and having visitors being told by care workers not to associate with them.

Uncomfortable assumptions about security: the UK vote on support for Saudi Arabia

Pervasive and problematic assumptions about the UK’s security lie at the heart of parliament’s recent decision to continue to support Saudi Arabia, despite accusations of war crimes in Yemen.

Brexit: yes, you will suffer as well

Bankrupt regions, impoverished hospitals, overcrowded prisons: Brexit will affect everybody in Europe. And yet nobody is taking responsibility for the mess.

Exploring two Alternatives

openDemocracy meets up with Denmark’s fastest-growing political party, Alternativet, and The Alternative UK, who inspired by them, have just launched their own ‘friendly revolution’. Interview.

Ireland, Brexit and our Disunited Kingdom

Will Brexit ultimately result in a united federal Ireland in a confederation with Scotland, in the EU – with England and Wales outside it?

Will Brexit spell the end of fishing quotas?

The Leave campaign promised that Brexit would help fishers ‘take back control’ of Britain’s fishing waters and stocks. But how quotas are allocated has always been a national decision.

Solidarity with Europe as 100,000 march on the UK parliament

European progressives are clear that the EU’s demise would spell disaster for its citizens, and yet, nothing short of a complete transformation can pull it back from the brink.

We've triggered Article 50. Is this such a tragedy for Europe?

It is now possible that new governments in France and Germany will respond to civil society pressure and do what is needed to change the EU, without being blocked by Britain.

Negotiating a global nuclear ban treaty: nuclear-armed states vs the UN

UN negotiations start today in New York on a global treaty to prohibit nuclear weapons. Ignoring cross-party commitments to multilateral nuclear disarmament, the British government will be absent.

Postscript to a letter to extremists

We can defeat extremism by building something beautiful together.

The banality of terrorism

Current responses seem to normalise terrorism – cementing it into the everyday reality of daily life, in the same way that we accept poverty, homelessness or inequality. The way things are.

The UK government’s attitude to refugees, then and now

Britain has a history of barbarism towards refugees.

Adding insult to injury: when Israel and Britain celebrate the historical trauma of Palestinians

Palestinians will not be silenced. We will voice our historical testimony and tell our narrative to make sense of the senseless grievances of colonialism.

Brexit and the UK Parliament

It is the role of Parliament, not least by its select committees, to hold the government to account at every stage along the way.

British academia's colourblind problem: an interview with Dr Nicola Rollock

Dr Nicola Rollock, lead author of the award-winning book The Colour of Class: the educational strategies of the Black middle classes, discusses race, equality and education in the UK.

The Sky bid: battle commences

No significant business decision at Sky has ever – ever – been taken without Rupert Murdoch's approval. So what difference might 100% ownership of Sky possibly entail?

A very British tug of war over Europe’s child refugees

Parliament has voted to silence the voices of local communities. Their message of European solidarity and warm welcome for refugees is an anathema to the politics of Brexit Britain.

No Women’s Day without refugee women

Hand-in-hand with Trump, Theresa May is not merely playing to an anti-migrant populist crowd but helped to create it. This system is working as intended, but it must be disrupted.

Responding to Brexit: breaking with neo-liberalism

The last of this series discusses how the damage caused by traditional left and social democratic party embrace of neo-liberal models of globalisation can be repaired, and social democracy reframed.

Responding to Brexit: returning to a social market model on migration

In the second part of the series on key inter-related aspects of the upheaval facing European countries and their citizens: how should the EU tackle the issue of internal migration?

Responding to Brexit: taking the political initiative

This three part series considers key inter-related aspects of the current political upheaval facing the citizens and countries of Europe. This first article examines how the European political class should respond.

Standing on the shoulders of Summerhill School

From the beginning of my work with Summerhill, initially as a fulltime science teacher, I worked with the children to share their experiences with other schools, teachers and universities.

Should domestic abuse have its own law?

In the UK, there is no specific offence for 'domestic violence'. Is the law failing women seeking justice?

Brexit wrecks it: the theory of collective decision making

Basically, political decision-making should not be win-or-lose, as facilitated by the most ancient, primitive, divisive and inaccurate measure of collective opinion ever invented.

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