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This week's editor

En Liang Khong

En Liang Khong is openDemocracy’s assistant editor.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

A different Europe or bust

As David Cameron’s renegotiation nears its uneventful conclusion, the big picture of what kind of Europe we want to live in is in danger of being lost. What can we do to change it?

How to support Syria

Today’s London conference might make a start by assessing the world’s catastrophic failure to stop the carnage in Syria and how this should be addressed for the future.

MPs' first report on the UK’s Investigatory Powers Bill – improvement needed

Will the Joint Committee have the confidence to echo this critique? We all hope they will, so the home secretary will be forced to fix this legislation.

Targeted killings through drones are war crimes

The threat that terrorists pose to US interests and security did not create killing drones: rather the technical feasibility of killing drones has generated imagined terrorist threats. Book review.

Can the Saudi-led coalition win the war in Yemen?

Those deciding for war in March 2015 gave little thought to Yemeni realities, military, logistic, topographic, social or political, human cost, or an exit strategy. But questions are being raised.

Del mostrador a la basura: el derroche alimentario y la cultura de la prisa

Un tercio de toda la comida producida en el mundo se tira a la basura.¿Qué está pasando? English

A Kafkaesque journey through the Freedom of Information Act

With ministers talking about restricting Britain's Freedom of Information Act, take these experiences of trying to weasel information out of government departments using FoI requests.

Does British TV have a problem with independent documentary?

The Unorthodocs season at Somerset House features acclaimed documentaries never seen on British TV. Are UK broadcasters denying audiences access to a golden age of independent film-making?

Current and future threats to public service broadcasting

While today we still stand on secure ground, are we about to witness a fairly catastrophic scenario for the future of Public Service Broadcasting?

Mr Cameron, the renegotiation and evidence-based policy making

The outcome of the British government’s attempt to renegotiate the UK’s terms of membership of the EU and the referendum that will follow is highly uncertain, but does reveal quite a lot about David Cameron.

The EU Common Fisheries Policy has helped, not harmed, UK fisheries

With an In/Out referendum on the horizon, we take a look at one of the EU's most maligned and misunderstood policies.

Why the BBC needs Hoggart’s vision now

We need a vision of public service broadcasting that extends intellectual and imaginative freedom, and is as relevant to today’s battles as the Pilkington Report was fifty years ago.

On the edge of a nation, sitting on the border

Life in UK’s indefinite immigration detention regime evokes the 'barbed wire disease' experienced by 'enemy aliens' interned during the World Wars. We must learn from our past to end detention. 

More religion?

It is an error for politicians and institutions to invite British Muslims to think about extremism as Muslims, rather than as citizens.

The difficulty of 'neoliberalism'

Disagreement over words is surely to be welcomed in a pluralist intellectual and political culture. Why is neoliberalism so provocative? Why is it Blairites in particular that are so provoked?

A threat to whom? Some implications of the rise of “extremist rhetoric”

“We need to call in question how, as a society, we allow our security and democracy to be defined.”

Would a privatised Channel 4 still be a serial risk-taker?

Would a privatised Channel 4 continue to support innovative programming, the independent production sector and the creative economy?

Cameron’s renegotiation speech and intra-EU migration: how the web reacted

Using natural language processing (NLP) techniques, we have analysed reactions to Cameron’s speech on Twitter, focusing in particular on the sensitive issue of intra-EU migration.

Navidad con Assange

Tras tres años de confinamiento, y a pesar del deterioro físico y psicológico, Assange sorprende por su voracidad intelectual y capacidad de atención. Busca el apoyo de Argentina y el mundo. English

Christmas with Assange

Confined in Ecuador’s embassy in London, Assange shows a patent physical and psychological deterioration. But with his intellectual appetite and attention span intact, he seeks international and Argentinean support. Spanish

When soldiers speak out

‘Soldiers have spoken out, protested, and revolted in almost every war in history. We need this resistance… one of the single strongest factors in bringing wars to an end.’

What has Channel 4 ever done for us?

Would Channel 4’s commitment to innovation, experiment and creativity survive privatisation?

How did mistrust of mainstream media become a sign of violent extremism?

The UK Government’s Prevent strategy has led to official claims that mistrust of mainstream media and anger about government policies can be symptomatic of violent extremism.

BAM! OUCH! Being a man

A festival in London allowed men to see other men outside the confines of a narrowly defined masculinity that limits their ability to navigate their emotional lives. Ironically, the event was held together by women.

A brand of manliness that is bad for the world

While women’s movements fight for empowerment, what is now destroying men is, paradoxically, the expectation to be powerful. Agnish Ray reports from London’s Being A Man festival. 

After the fast track: what next for the detention of asylum seekers?

UK courts have ruled the routine detention of asylum seekers undergoing accelerated claims to be ‘systemically unfair and unjust’. But faced with hostile politics, how much can strategic litigation deliver?

The paradox of the Syrian conflict and its politics

While the French president has won public approval and international backing for the fight against IS, differences persist about the necessity of coordinating with Russia.

“All those featured are white” - what can we do about diversity at the BBC?

Fifteen years since the BBC pledged to reflect “the UK’s diversity in our programmes, our services and our workforce” little has changed. Why, and what can we do about it?

Does the BBC care about class?

The BBC has made a concerted effort to reflect the diversity of Britain when it comes to race and gender. They should apply the same approach to socio-economic background.

3 scenarios for the outcome of the UK’s EU referendum

It is quite possible that England will vote differently to all three other constituent parts of the UK. And certain that the politics won’t end with the result.

The BBC needs a new Scottish channel

Why isn't there a digital Scottish channel for the 5 million Scots who speak English? Such a move could start to heal the wounds between Scotland and the BBC.

Syria: to bomb or not to bomb? That is not the question

Recognise and accept the hard reality that there is no quick fix to the ISIS problem, no one solution: bombing is not the only option.

Three realities of the Isis conflict

The west must prioritise civilian wellbeing in any intervention. What might help?

The BBC: what is really going on?

Is the BBC spinning a big lie over the need to find cuts of between £550 and £700 million a year to fund the cost of the over-75 licences?

Paris as a test case for the west

One effective way for western governments to keep their people safe is to press for fundamental reforms in countries where armed extremists thrive, rather than subverting democracy at home.

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