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This week's editor

Manuel Serrano

Manuel Serrano is junior editor at DemocraciaAbierta.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Stop Trump – definitely! But then what?

Resisting Trump should involve asking the UK government to reconsider its approach to global security alliances.

The sociology and psychology of xenophobia

In votes for Brexit, and in Trump, we are hearing an indivisible claim for a national, ethnic, gender and class identity. But the claim emerges not from pride, but from shame.

First week of the DiEM25 UK Manifesto Group

How do 57 people write a manifesto?

A false reality has contributed to a new political reality

The descent into complex post-factual politics goes some way to showing why Brexit and Trump were so successful, and their opposition so ineffective. 

The right to have visiting rights

May's not the only one trying to have it both ways. Before Trump’s election, the US, long-heralded (and self-celebrating) “nation of immigrants,” was lowering the lamp beside its golden door.

Working class racism

Following my initial surprise, my first reaction, as always when I encounter the rhetorically inclusive “we”, was to wonder who they might be; was I now part of this “we” ?

A battle for the meaning of British Conservatism

What rescues Conservatives from internecine conflict like that of the Labour Party? Oakeshott claimed that the conservative does not have a creed or doctrine, but rather a ‘disposition’.

UK's Official Secrets Acts overhaul provides little protection for whistleblowers

Whistleblowers who leak official information could be prosecuted and jailed regardless of the public merit of the information they revealed, or whether any damage to national interests was actually caused.

Chilling effects: the politics of anti-semitism in the UK

A former specialist adviser to the House of Commons Social Services Committee has written a detailed critique of the Home Affairs Committee’s Report on anti-Semitism. We find out why.

Palestinian rights and Israel’s agenda

The Israeli government and its supporters need to break out of the prison house of their own thinking by taking a broader and more inclusive view of things. 

State surveillance is a global threat to press freedom

The state should not have the power to secretly identify then persecute whistleblowers.

Brexit, populism and the promise of agency

In a world experienced as one of out-of-control forces, all the more irresistible at the transnational level, how welcome for many would be the promise to reassert control?

DiEM25-UK - launching at Conway Hall

At Conway Hall in Central London, (long an important place for radical religious, philosophical, social and political thinking in the UK), on Saturday morning, January 28, 2017, DiEM25 held its UK organisational launch.

Something's changing - the launch of DiEM25 in London

Conway Hall gets us going.

 

 

China and the embarrassment of western democracy

The trouble for democracy does not come from Beijing, or from globalisation, or from abroad, or, in Britain, from immigration or from Europe. It resides at home.

Persecution and the threat to the refugee system

We need to accept that for millions of refugees persecution is the principal reason for flight today as it was before, during and after the Holocaust.

The media–technology–military industrial complex

In a world of so-called fake news and post-truth politics, the influence of largely invisible qualities of concentrated power over media, public and policy agendas, warrants renewed and urgent scrutiny.

The failed Trident missile test is emblematic of a wider malaise

The UK Government insists that it is in favour of multilateral disarmament but this pretence has been laid bare by its vehement opposition to the forthcoming Nuclear Ban Treaty.

Parliamentarians - wake up!

The author launches a new blog with a message on Brexit – parliament wake up! Former Labour parliamentarian replies on how to correct the imbalance exploited by Thatcher, Blair and May.

UK counter-extremism agenda: ‘Safeguarding’ as routine punishment and collective self-policing

The programme’s operation depends on collective self-policing through fear of punishment. These practices become yet another bureaucratic performance indicator.

The BBC and Wales' information deficit

Wales suffers the unique problem of a lack of information, as opposed to misinformation. Welsh people need to explore alternative media forms to create a Welsh public sphere

The battle of governments against extremism has to be credible

Byrne writes, ‘the starting point for radicalisation may in fact be rage rather than religion…it’s not the madrassa that is the problem, it’s your mates.’ Book review.

BAFTA/BFI Film Diversity Measures may not lead to BAME employment

The press should not exaggerate the effectiveness of the film diversity measures introduced by BAFTA this week. They deserve only a small welcome.

Bigotry seeks company in the UK

We historians at the University of Warwick are very concerned about the racism that is becoming increasingly commonplace over Britain, especially in the aftermath of the Brexit vote.

Is BBC Question Time’s audience producer really a fascist?

A freak Twitter storm engulfed the audience producer of the popular current affairs programme last week, as it was revealed she had shared Facebook posts by far right groups. But is there more to it?

UK National Security Strategy: security for whom?

To make real progress on tackling insecurity, there needs to be far greater commitment by the British government to addressing its causes, and not just its symptoms.

The Sharia debate in the UK: who will listen to our voices?

Over 300 abused women have signed a statement opposing Sharia courts and religious bodies, warning of the growing threat to their rights and to their collective struggles for security and independence.

The BBC has been weak on its coverage of climate change

The BBC should have been a leader in educating the public on climate change. But its weakness has only encouraged doubt about the existence of man-made climate change altogether.

How to be President, in 140 characters or (much) less

Missive from New York. Traditional US media are struggling with the most surprising turn in US politics for decades. But it’s not all bad news.

'We are the granddaughters of the witches you weren’t able to burn.'

An art project on two narrow boats hitched together on a canal in northern England is celebrating co-dependency - countering both the racial divide and the massive cuts to women’s services.

Not alone: what the UK can learn from union co-ops

With nearly 5 million people in the UK now self-employed, we need to find new ways to ensure today’s workers have rights and representation.

Are universities preventing violence against women?

Sexual harassment of women students is rife and violence against women in universities is commonplace. Are universities reflecting cultural norms of violence against women instead of shaping new norms?

The future of EU nationals in the UK

Ultimately, the economic claims made by Remain were unconvincing because those in power made them so.

'All day, everyday': where is the protection against violence in schools and universities?

The scale of harassment and violence in schools means girls and boys need more than sex and relationships education. It’s time we used human rights law.

The end of domestic violence support for black and brown women in the UK?

Dedicated refuges were created to answer a desperate need. Now their survival is at risk. 

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