only search

This week's editor

Rosemary Belcher-2.jpg

Rosemary Bechler is openDemocracy’s Editor.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Crying wolf?

A cavalier use of evidence in the UK’s latest Home Affairs Committee report is feeding a moral panic about antisemitism, rather than dealing with an increasingly racist, intolerant society.

Portrait of the artist and The Confession, Part One

An interview with the director of The Confession, Moazzam Begg’s story commissioned by BBC Storyville and the BFI - one of the most resonant modern stories for our times.

What UK-EU relations do we want and what is the 'good society'?

An interview with Catherine West, MP, secretary and co-founder of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on UK-EU Relations, scrutinising Brexit negotiations and pushing for a progressive relationship with our European neighbours.

The cyber-war on WikiLeaks

WikiLeaks is not only influencing the US elections, but transforming the US elections – as they should have been from the very beginning – into a global debate.

Resurgent Sikh fundamentalism in the UK: time to act?

Growing confidence among resurgent Sikh fundamentalist networks in the UK was evident in recent protests against inter-faith marriage. A desire to control Sikh women’s relationship choices is a key focal point for their mobilisation.

Next steps in the democracy argument

Any engagement approach not focused on getting the widest possible range of voices, and creating multiple environments in which they feel comfortable will be no improvement on the current system.

Small steps in the struggle for digital rights?

In this rapidly expanding internet, the kinds of rights we need are often difficult to pin down – though pin them down we must if they are to be protected.

Jackie Walker: a suspense mystery

To paraphrase Oscar Wilde, to be suspended once may be regarded as a misfortune; twice looks like carelessness. But whose?

The UK’s Investigatory Powers Bill is about to become law – here's why that should terrify us

The evidence that these powers are all needed is thin indeed. And the cost to all of our privacy is huge.

Nonlethal security – supporting peace by reducing the damage of war

Military technologies are becoming increasingly lethal and unpredictable year by year and month by month. There’s more than one alternative.

The lynching of Jackie Walker

The attacks on Jackie Walker and others are political, a determined effort by the Israel lobby to make Britain’s Labour Party safe for Israel and Zionism. 

Channel 4: a national treasure?

Channel 4 has been named Channel of the Year at the Edinburgh International Television Festival. But what does the future hold?

Brexit Britain: what went wrong and what next? Panel 1

A discussion on why Britain voted for Brexit and what radical remainers should do now. (Video, 80 mins).

A Europe united against refugees

Hungary may have been first to literally wall off some of its frontiers, but its example has since been copied, by the French and the British. Francais.

The problem with politicians and democracy…

"Opening up new forms of political participation to hear the voices of the politically marginalised is critical for the well being of our polity." Interview in the run-up to the World Forum for Democracy 2016.

The draft BBC Charter is “distinctively” fishy

The latest twist in the Bake Off saga is a reminder of why we should be suspicious about the draft BBC Charter’s emphasis on “distinctiveness”

Can the fabric of a diverse society be undone? Diary of an EU citizen in the UK

“A few days later the PM and the Health Secretary, Hunt, have ready a proposal to train more British doctors - the same Hunt who has upset the majority of British doctors.”

The BBC must improve its religious affairs coverage

The BBC looks set to keep its religious coverage, but in a society where people increasingly identify as irreligious, how can it remain relevant?

From torture to de-radicalisation: towards public accountability of secret policies designed to prevent terrorism

To penetrate walls of official secrecy and eddies of highly selective information provision, civil society might use the proposed benchmark of accountability demands to help navigate this difficult area.

Listening to Refugee Tales on the Pilgrim’s Way

The act of listening and the power of voice constitute the ‘act in the dark’ which can unite us and re-shape the punitive and hostile immigration landscape in Britain.

Theresa May and the love police

In Theresa May’s “One Nation” we are all border guards. Her vision of the Big Society will make us all shrink.

Diversity - what Ofcom needs to do

Ofcom's new CEO has pledged to make diversity and inclusion a priority. The regulator needs to improve or it could face judicial review.

Refugee women in the UK: Pushing a stone into the sea

From personal experience I know that arrival in the UK for asylum seekers does not signal safety, but reform is a ‘chaser game’: refugee women are pressuring the Home Office to improve decision making and end detention, says Beatrice Botomani.

Israel’s right to exist

The reason why the claimed ‘right to exist’ is problematic is a question of definition, not of dematerialisation. A reply to Mary Davis’ reply.

Jeremy Corbyn – a mainstream [Scandinavian] social democrat

If there is such a thing as a ‘best practice approach’ in public policy the Nordic model would probably be it and, at any measure, a useful benchmark for Britain to move towards.

The Great British Bake Off defects to Channel 4 - what does it all mean?

How did a baking show become the BBC's biggest hit? And how risky is it for Channel 4 to bid £10 million a year more than the BBC was willing to pay to poach the programme?

Reply to Jonathan Rosenhead: ‘Is Zionist a rude word?’

A distinction must in all cases be made between the state and civil society.

We need bolder politicians

“We have seen a lengthy period during which politicians have deliberately disengaged from important aspects of what they should be doing, leading to a lot of disillusionment with politics.”

Introducing our new series: what is public service?

Today Our Beeb launches a new series on public service in the post-Brexit age. Here editor Ellie Mae O'Hagan explains what inspired the series.

Who, apart from its people, wants peace in Yemen?

Diplomatic activity has increased. But how serious are their efforts? Will they achieve anything?

The Corbyn crowd, and its signal

What is really going on in Jeremy Corbyn's Labour Party? An open-air meeting and the changes in a ward branch give some clues.

Saudi forces are killing civilians in Yemen, so why is the UK still arming the regime?

Did the British government lie in court about Saudi arms deals?

The only way to purge Labour’s morbid symptoms: vote for Jeremy Corbyn

“For someone who did not yet realise that This Always Happens, who still didn't know what was normal… it made it worse that, on the day, there was really no alternative.”

Lessons from Rio: how can the BBC compete with bigger sports broadcasters?

As the Rio Olympics draws to a close, we take a look at the how the BBC can protect itself from losing out to broadcasters like Sky and BT Sport.

Federalism and the European left

Politically, it may well be ideologically hopeless. But it is crucial to realize that, institutionally, the EU is a very plastic organization.

Syndicate content