This week's editor

En Liang Khong

En Liang Khong is a submissions editor at openDemocracy and a freelance journalist.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

For Moroccan rights groups, good reputations aren’t enough

Without building a strong popular base, the Moroccan human rights community cannot capitalize on its good reputation. A contribution to openGlobalRights’ Public Opinion and Human Rights debate. Françaisالعربية

Have reports of the death of capitalism been greatly exaggerated?

Capitalism isn’t going anywhere without a fight, no matter how inventive the alternatives. 

Whilst politicians go off on their holidays, let's unite and fight

OurNHS is the only media outlet that is fiercely pro-NHS. We break vital stories that other media miss. And now we need your help.

The creation of ‘trafficking’

Trafficking received its current definition only fifteen years ago. Since that time, the policies pursued in its name have done incalculable damage to the children they purport to protect.

Fracturing democracy? State, fracking and local power in Lancashire

Fracking may have been rejected in Lancashire, but the battle reveals that power is being stripped from the people of Britain.

A moron speaks...

According to a former adviser to Tony Blair, MPs who nominated Jeremy Corbyn for the Labour leadership are "morons". What does one of them have to say about a leading Corbyn policy, nuclear disarmament?

Did Kevin Spacey deserves his knighthood?

The Old Vic has become part of a network of dissenting theatrical voices that will not be easily silenced.

What hope for Labour and the left? The election, the 80s and ‘aspiration’

To understand what a Corbyn win would mean we need to understand what happened in the 80s. Labour must start building beyond the party - it must be part of broader social currents.

The Cyprus solution: gas, guarantees and grassroots

For the first time since 2004 there seems to be hope for a solution to the Cyprus problem. What are the impediments for the negotiations and how can they be overcome now?

You call this a Rechtsstaat?

Legal improvisation marks European policy-making in the Eurozone crisis. This crisis damages the rule of law so essential to the European model and without which Europe will not last.

Ukraine is ripe for the shock doctrine

Like many states in crisis before it, Ukraine serves as a perfect opportunity for neoliberal transformation.

Electioneering games in Siberia

Ahead of local elections later this year, Russia’s newly united opposition is trying its hand in Siberia. But their latest travails in Novosibirsk show what they are up against.

Women post-recession: moving towards insecurity

After the recession, the rise in casual and precarious contracts is entrenching gender inequality in the UK.

A 24/7, transparent NHS – or the rise of the planet of the apps?

Is the English government's enthusiasm for health ‘apps’ and ‘data transparency’, for the benefit of patients – or markets? Or even a trojan horse for a pay-NHS?

How the Turkish elections changed the foreign policy of Turkey

Governments with declining electoral success may use adventurous foreign policy choices or make radical shifts in their foreign policies to gain re-election.

HIV and AIDS: language and the blame game

The negative and dehumanizing language used by scientists discussing global HIV policy is sapping the soul of those on the receiving end. The call for an alternative language of nature and nurture must be heard. 

AIDS targets: the fear factor

HIV is not just a health issue but a multi-sectoral issue that requires many different players. Is the UNAIDS HIV '90-90-90' fast-track initiative in Uganda achievable?

Gaza's dark night

Palestinians want to leave. Nothing else. All Palestinians. Because there is not even drinking water anymore in Gaza. Even the Hamas guys in charge just want to leave.

UNAIDS: Bold human rights targets need better monitoring

If UN agencies set bold targets for human rights reform, they must commit to reporting rigorously on progress to achieve them. EspañolFrançais


The Conservative assault on industrial relations

While offering a higher new minimum wage, the Tories are trying to destroy the means by which workers across the spectrum bargain for decent wages. This is no route to a high wage economy.