This week's editor

Jeremy Noble, editor

This week Jeremy Noble and the oDR team edit the front page.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

A frightening vision: on plans to rebuild the Alexandria Lighthouse

If modern Alexandrian history is any indicator, rebuilding the lighthouse will become a symbol not of communal spirit but of excess, and a visible target of rage. 

From Gezi Park to Turkey’s transformed political landscape

The sociological transformation made manifest in these election results will continue to profoundly affect the political sphere in Turkey for the foreseeable future. 

Bleak prospects for the Muslim Brotherhood

Maged MandourThe main obstacle facing Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood is arguably not physical repression, but the urgent need for self-rehabilitation.

 

Havens of the one percent: a video interview with Harold Crooks

Harold Crooks’ film The Price We Pay (2014) explores how evolving national taxation systems favour bigger corporations. From the Open City Documentary Festival.

Family secrets: a video interview with Karen Guthrie

Karen Guthrie’s film The Closer We Get (2015) offers a rare insight into her family’s story and the secret that her father kept hidden from the family for so long. From the Open City Documentary Festival.

Love in the age of robots: a video interview with Sander Burger

Sander Burger’s film Alice Cares (2015) delves into the lives of three elderly women who participate in a pilot study with a ‘care-droid’, called Alice. From the Open City Documentary Festival.

“This used to be a cherry orchard”: a video interview with Ryuji Otsuka

Ryuji Otsuka’s film Beijing Ants (2014) explores the consequences of his family’s eviction from a Beijing apartment. From the Open City Documentary Festival.

Russia’s last independent mayor is going down fighting

Galina_Shirshina_speech_stand СС Vladimir Larionov.jpgIn Petrozavodsk, Karelia, the conflict between Russia’s last independent mayor and the governor has turned nasty. The political fallout could reach the Kremlin.

Book review: Alisa Ganieva, 'The Mountain and the Wall'

The Mountain and the Wall is the first Dagestani novel to be published in English. Ganieva is very courageous to write about what is happening in her native country, thinly veiled in the traditional Russian literary use of fiction.

‘Love where you live’, and other lies of gentrification

Let’s admit that gentrification is an immoral urban process. It is a deliberate policy of social engineering and needs to be tackled at its source.

The emergency budget - is it time to chain up 11 Downing Street to stop it poisoning us with 'austerity'?

'Austerity' is as discredited an approach to twenty-first century ills, as the 'miasma' theory was to nineteenth century ones. But where are our modern John Snows?

Eradicating violent extremism from Tunisia? Dry up the sources

It will be important to empower young people, to train them to exercise critical thought, and to make them conscious of the importance of their participation in society. A call to civil society.  

The damage for which Chevron has failed to compensate its victims in Ecuador

For 20 years, farmers and indigenous people have been fighting the Chevron-Texaco corporation for recognition of the damage it has caused in the Ecuadorian Amazon. Español

If you care about changing society, focus on strengths

Asking “What is wrong with our community?” will produce quite different answers to asking, “What would our ideal community be like?”  

Partners in prayer: women's rights and religion in Morocco

Pundits say that religion and human rights are opposing forces in Morocco, especially around women’s rights. Our Human Rights Perception Polls suggest a more nuanced picture. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debates, Public Opinion and Human Rights and Religion and Human Rights.  Françaisالعربية

7 myths about immigration

On the face of it, our many misconceptions about immigration form a very depressing picture. Yet more accurate information can shift public opinion in a more positive direction.

Electoral reform - a bout of opportune amnesia

The electoral system is one of the most divisive and damaging fault lines in British democracy. But the reform movement itself is fatally flawed.

British Values – teaching the myth

We can tell young people that they enjoy “British” values until we’re blue in the face. However, this won’t change what those from disadvantaged backgrounds actually experience in the real world.

Ethiopia after its electoral drama: second “renewal” imminent ?

The history of this country is one of eternal recurrence. The ‘national question” re-emerges where it has always been, with varying degrees of visibility: at the heart of Ethiopian political life. 

Spain's Podemos shows us that we can (but without Labour)

If the UK is to learn anything from the political changes in Spain, it must be that Podemos was formed out of the failings of the country’s traditional socialist party.