only search openDemocracy.net

This week's editor

“Sunny

Sunny Hundal is openDemocracy’s social media editor.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Tony Blair's impact on British, European and world politics began in an aura of freshness and optimism and is ending in bitter controversy – over policy failure, allegations of corruption, and above all the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. How will history judge him?

Britain and the problem of living in the past

As Jubilee celebrations die down in the short period of calm before the Olympics, questions arise about what all this means, what Britain and Britishness is, and what the future might be for both.

Tony Blair : farewell letters

Britain's prime minister is leaving the stage after ten years. openDemocracy writers say goodbye.

Gordon Brown: an intellectual without an intelligentsia

Britain's chancellor will be invited by Queen Elizabeth II to form a government on 27 June 2007, and thus become Tony Blair's successor as prime minister. Anthony Barnett tracks his journey.

London and Washington: Tony Blair's special relationship

The British prime minister's peculiar attitude to America’s leaders weighs heavily on his domestic legacy, says Godfrey Hodgson.

Religion in Britain in the Blair era

The increasing presence of faith issues in public life during Tony Blair's time in office is reflected in the messianic strain of his personal-political vision, says Tina Beattie.

The Blair audit: war, human rights, liberalism

The true stature of Britain's prime minister may become apparent only after he leaves office, says Brian Brivati.

Blair's foreign-policy legacy

Blair's brave vision of humanitarian intervention, born in Sierra Leone and Kosovo, died in Iraq. The tragedy is the waste of promise, says Felix Blake.

Tony Blair and the language of politics

The British prime minister's self-consciously new vocabulary has a complex relationship to political reality, says Norman Fairclough.

Tony Blair's genius

The British prime minister has replaced real politics with a carefully crafted fiction, says Roger Scruton.
Syndicate content