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This week's editor

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Rosemary Bechler is openDemocracy’s Editor.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Control over people's lives is shifting beyond the grasp of traditional institutions. Democracy is embraced as a vision, but can be endlessly frustrated or disappointing in practice.

Tunisia’s struggle against corruption: time to fight, not forgive

A new economic reconciliation law protects clientelist structures in Tunisia and replaces the process of transitional justice, but a real transition away from the old authoritarian social contract will be impossible if it passes.

Populism, terrorism, and the crisis in western democracies: an interview with Iran’s former president

Abolhassan Banisadr, Iran's first post-revolutionary president, discusses neo-liberalism, the crisis in western democracies, and the relationship between Islamic terrorism and the rise of far-right politics.

Do the people of Kurdistan live in security?

The main threat to the people in the Kurdistan Region in Iraq is not ISIL, but failed governance which endangers human security.

How to make America great again? Bully Mexico.

As President Trump concludes his first week in the White House with extremely protectionist policies, there will be no sigh of relief in Latin America.  Español

Ripping back the veil: an interview with Arun Kundnani

Trump promises politics in its naked form: the seizure of power for his clan, and be damned with all the rest. As the centre ground collapses, we must not cling to it. 

Is there a connection between Muslim 'superdiversity' and sectarian violence?

What lies behind two intra-Muslim killings in Britain? The question is timely at the unifying moment of a new Muslim year. 

Horse trading in the UN

The leading candidate to succeed Mr. Ban Ki-Moon as new Secretary General of the UN is former Portuguese PM Antonio Guterres. The election procedure, however, is as undemocratic as ever. Português Español  

How the Democrats left the door wide open for Donald Trump

The Democrats ditched the working class in favour of a professional elite leaving Trump  a master of 'resentment politics'  to hoover up their votes. An interview with Listen Liberal! author Thomas Frank.

How the BBC can create a better digital public sphere

The BBC’s remit is not just broadcast. It has the power to improve our experiences online, and to realise the digital public sphere we want.

Erdoğan and Putin: unalike likeness

The leaders of Turkey and Russia are often compared. But their differences are more instructive than their similarities.

(This article was first published on 22 November 2014)

"The BBC stands for what we all have in common".

Last week OurBeeb editor Aaron Bastani spoke to Peter Oborne about the BBC, its future and the role of public service broadcasting in modern Britain.

Which source do students trust more? BBC News vs Facebook News Feed

Despite growing disenchantment with TV and the press, new research finds students continue to trust the BBC and mainstream media more than their Facebook friends.

No revolution this year: Sudan’s October Revolution and the Arab Spring

Sudan's 1964 revolution brought a military regime to an end. The reasons for the revolt were similar to those of the Arab Spring, and they persist—so why are there no protests?

Argentina and the closing of the cycle

At the runoff on November 22, Argentinians will have to choose their next president, but they have already decided on the closing of the Kirchnerista cycle. Español.

Neoliberalismo tardío y sus enemigos

Los movimientos sociales se enfrentan a 3 retos: el reto simbólico de construir algo nuevo; el reto material de movilizar recursos limitados; y el reto estratégico de influenciar un sistema político muy cerrado. English.

Mientras el mundo anda mirando, hay 59,5 millones de desplazados internos en la tierra

Unos 6 millones de colombianos hacen que el segundo país del mundo con más desplazados internos (DIs) por motivos de violencia no esté en Oriente Medio, sino en América Latina. Português. English.

The mounting paralysis of Latin America’s Left (Part 1)

An increasingly exhausted South American Left finds itself trapped between similar contradictions to those undermining its counterparts in Europe. Español.

Dirty money, damaged democracy: what to do?

Illicit funds can harm democratic institutions at every level and in all global regions. But there are ways to prevent or at least limit the damage.

The last couple of days in Athens and in solidarity

Tribute to the Greek left from a fellow European who won’t forget the run-up to the historic Greek referendum.

From Dudley to Detroit: a tale of two mosques

The tensions around new mosques in the west, from their construction to who controls them, are illuminated by the theory of religious economy.

Armenia, memories of the land

A century after the genocide of the Ottoman Armenians, Vicken Cheterian goes in search of its living traces on the modern borderlands where Turkey, Syria and Lebanon meet.

Bob Dylan: revolution in the head, revisited

The most influential and original musician of the 1960s generation remains a figure of protean creativity half a century on. The wealth of attention still devoted to Bob Dylan is testament to a career of astonishing range. It also reflects the complex legacy of a formative decade which Dylan’s songs and persona helped to define, says David Hayes.

(This article was first published on 24 May 2011)

Bradford West: politics comes alive

A fusion of history, politics and personality gives the electoral contest in one British constituency a unique flavour.

European vs Arab revolutions: regimes, ideas, violence

Why did east-central Europe find a non-violent freedom path in 1989-91, while the Arab world failed to do so after 2011?

Bangladesh: contempt of court vs freedom of speech

A blogger was convicted in Dhaka for his writing. A group of people who backed him in the press now faces the same charge. Why is this happening in Bangladesh?

Turkey's future: Erdoğan, elections and the Kurds

Turkey is gearing up for pivotal elections on 7 June. At their heart is a complex interplay between presidential ambitions, party fissures, and Kurdish aspirations.

Armenian genocide, a century on

A hundred years after the genocide of Armenians in the Ottoman empire, widening acceptance of the crime is shadowed by Ankara's continual evasion.

China, the idea-hungry nation

China's restless intellectual energy carries an echo of Austria-Hungary in the pre-1914 years.

Yemen's frail faultlines

The seizure of power in Sanaa by Houthi rebels has alerted the world to the crisis in Yemen. But it never really went away.

The English Defence League and the new far-right

A street demo against "Islamisation" shows the potential for the English far-right to regain lost momentum.

Libya’s downward spiral

Libya after the Qadhafi regime is witnessing a complex array of struggles in which ambitions for power, claims to legitimacy, the taint of the past, and ownership of the 2011 revolution are among the key dividing lines.

The road to hell is paved with rapid reactions

In the wake of a vicious crime, caution and restraint are a virtue.

China, questions of loyalty

What determines political survival among China's party elite? Where are the traps that ensnare men like Zhou Yongkang and Ling Jihua? The ambiguities of loyalty are a useful way to bring these questions into focus. 

Iran vs ISIS, stubborn imperial designs

The conflict of radical Shi'a-Sunni forces is fuelled by unyielding absolutisms that oppose the world's leading trends over the past century.

A war of new connections

The close links between American surveillance of Africa and military facilities in England are revealed by campaigners working for non-violent social change.

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