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This week’s editors

“Francesc”

Francesc Badia i Dalmases is Editor and Director of democraciaAbierta.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

How communication technology became a tool of repression: the case of the UAE

With the help of international ‘cyber security dealers’, the internet has been transformed into a central component of authoritarian control.

Hyper-security, video-surveillance and borders: an interview with Catarina Frois

What types of democratic control of movement should we be fighting for?

Beyond powerlessness

If we want to escape from our situation of powerlessness and anxiety, we must re-examine our relationship to the political, and strive to produce new types of political practice. Français.

Defending human rights in a digital age (II)

Are our rights online under threat by our own governments? What real and imagined dangers face citizens at the online-offline nexus? Watch the wide-ranging panel discussion which launched openDemocracy's new 2016 partnership, 'Human rights and the internet'.

Facebook’s dominance deepens

Two recent Facebook initiatives, “Instant Articles” and “internet.org” are set to entrench the firm’s dominance. Is this a moral monopoly in the making?

1984 revisited

As a Lib Dem MP, I discovered just how close Britain is to Orwell's dystopian vision, where the state has incredible powers to monitor everything we do. 

In new gods do we trust?

Do you expect the machine to solve the problems? In this wide-ranging interview with the Director of the Open Rights Group we discuss bulk collection, state bureaucracies, the pre-crime era and trust.

Digital citizenship: from liberal privilege to democratic emancipation

On the anniversary of the Magna Carta, a call for a new debate on the conception of citizenship. Let’s seize the opportunity to transform our utopian dreams into everyday life.

Scope-creep in Denmark

It takes vigilance to prevent the terrorist attacks in Copenhagen from exacting not only the lives of two innocent people, but also the freedoms and human rights enjoyed by Danish citizens.

PODCAST: Defending human rights in a digital age

A panel discussion chaired by Marianne Franklin at Goldsmiths opens up the many human rights implications for the future of the internet as struggles over its ownership and control gather steam. (2 hours 1 minute).

Mass surveillance: wrong in practice as well as principle

The paradox of mass state surveillance, as the answer to non-state violence, is that it can overlook the intelligence targeted law enforcement finds and render critical infrastructures vulnerable—never mind threatening fundamental freedoms.

Will the democratic debate over counterrorism gain the edge in battle?

It is our role, as citizens, to scrutinise measures taken in the name of our security and ask, once and for all, for evidenced-based policies: there are no such things as depoliticised and neutral counter-terrorism strategies.

How generalised suspicion destroys society

Generalised suspicion is the ultimate destroyer of the social fabric: it thrives on betrayal, and fosters mutual distrust and demoralisation. And nowadays, it is impossible for anyone to be beyond suspicion.

Privacy, surveillance and the state-corporate symbiosis

The relationship between governments and private corporations is defined by symbiotic, complex interdependence. How can we ensure democratic control in these conditions?

Open protocols and open people: preserving the transformational potential of social media

People are the most valuable thing on the internet, so the power to connect, share and work together shouldn’t be curbed by companies who exploit us for monetary value while limiting the flow of information.

Challenging the era of mass surveillance

Protecting our fundamental rights against the destructive effect of mass surveillance is an essential task that should engage us all.

The UN privacy report: Five Eyes remains

Will Navi Pillay's defiant stand on privacy be the first step to dismantling the dubious legal frameworks propping up the Five Eyes intelligence-sharing arrangement? 

The digital freedom risk: too fragile an acknowledgment

At least at first, freedom dies without human beings being physically hurt. The author is convinced that the freedom risk is the most fragile among the global risks we have experienced so far. He calls for a digital humanism.

The (un)freedom of the networked

The web has a dual nature - it promotes some freedoms and endangers many others. Making the most of it will mean fighting for it (from the archive, 2008)

Liberty, Liberalism and Surveillance: a historic overview

One of Britain's most distinguished political theorists on republicanism, freedom, Machiavelli, Hobbes, the Reformation, Shakespeare, Milton and much more. Has modern society lost touch with Roman conceptions of freedom, and at what cost?

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