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Scrapping FCC net neutrality rules would be a mistake

Repealing net neutrality would result in the de facto concentration of internet control of revenue from accessible services into the hands of certain gatekeepers, undermining the open architecture that allows the free exchange of ideas.

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Internet equality is about to get Trumped – let’s build a wall to defend it

The principle that the internet should be as fast as possible for all its users means small voices with big ideas can transform society. Let's keep it that way.

Why BigData is running roughshod over the NHS - and what to do about it

The NHS is being treated as both a 'cash cow' and a 'data cow', a string of recent scandals suggest. And now there's another privacy-bashing tech bonanza on the way, as ID cards rise from the ashes of Brexit policy.

Shielding data from the "five eyes": we need to stand up for encryption

A coalition of 83 organizations and individuals from five countries has come together to demand stronger defence of encryption, following the “Five Eyes” ministerial meeting in Ottawa last week.

Child safeguarding cloaks state surveillance and data exploitation

Child safeguarding is being used to get away with 24/7 surveillance. The government must not misuse 'child safeguarding' as a false flag in data protection, and apply new rules to everyone but itself.

Theresa May’s counter-extremism plan will create an incompetent police state

After the terrorist attack in Finsbury Park, the Tories proposed a series of policies that would effectively police and criminalise thoughts. This will do nothing whatsoever to address what incubates violent extremism.

What does ‘mainstream media bias’ mean in a digital age?

The internet should mean that everyone has access to the same information, yet people still talk of a “mainstream media bias”.

What the Romans did for us: on the age-old art of propaganda

People see propaganda as a modern problem – manipulation by mass media. But the story is far older, and the tactics are timeless. While the game has moved on, the rules remain the same.

Creatives need to get political. And quick.

Instead of just doing and enjoying the work they get paid for, creatives should be aware of their potential societal impact and be more outspoken in their political choices.

A new digital trade agenda: are we giving away the Internet?

Will this foster digital rights, or leave us with even lower standards and a concentrated, quasi-monopolistic market benefiting from public infrastructure?

First, admit we have a problem

In December 2016, an Ipsos poll for BuzzFeed of more than 3,000 Americans found that 75 per cent of those who saw fake news headlines judged them to be accurate. Post Truth: The New War on Truth and How to Fight Back, Ebury.

The cold intimacy that comes when the TV calls your name

This pretence of being friendly and of knowing us is a well-worn tool of capitalism – as noises crowd our lives, it becomes harder to find peace.

Global connectivity and personal disconnect: filter bubbles and the collapse of public discourse

The individualisation of our exposure to information through ‘filter bubbles’ facilitates the atomisation of society and pushes dissenting voices to the margins.

Is language as we know it still relevant for the digital age?

According to a number of neuroscientists and philosophers, language might not be the ultimate medium for the transmission of ideas. In the digital age, it is essential to understand its role and explore the new possibilities technology creates.

The quiet revolution that could transform lives

Most people can't afford a transcript from their own trial even when it's the only thing that could prove their innocence. We need to move beyond the status quo.

 

Commons-sense? Contemporary challenges and prospects of community shared resources

How could shared resources and self-organized citizen systems create new paradigms of economics, politics and culture possible?

The debate the media won't have: government snooping made NHS hacking easier

Even Microsoft now admits that government snooping has made it much easier for hackers.

Changing the world without taking power? Bitcoin and the challenges of consensus

Bitcoin could provide a more democratic alternative for managing the economy, relying on objective mathematical tools, rather than economists with a free market bias. But there are obstacles along the way.

The curious rise of the ‘white left’ as a Chinese internet insult

Meet the Chinese netizens who combine a hatred for the ‘white left’ with a love of US president Donald Trump.

Listen to a recorded audio version of this article.

Pokéwalking while black: Pokémon GO and America’s ‘e-quality’ of life

Pokémon Go may be a silly diversion, but it’s still one in which the dynamics of systemic racism and spaces of colour come into play.

This is how you can leverage social media to uncover wrongdoing

Investigative platform Exposing the Invisible has released a pack of resources for citizen journalists and activists to learn how to use social media information for their investigations.

Facebook needs to face up to the new political reality

Facebook should disclose data on how campaigns are using the platform for political advertising. This general election might be an opportunity to bring that ideal closer.

Smiling into the abyss: what is Facebook doing to our mental health?

Lazy and unconcerned, or buckling under the strains of late capitalism? A manifesto for the selfie generation asks whether we can break our addiction to social media. Book review.

Transatlantic data transfers and privacy protection: an ongoing battle

A meaningful legal response would be the establishment of global privacy standards – a ‘new universal law on surveillance’. Undoubtedly, EU law and case law could provide a guiding light.

Method in Trump’s madness?

A look at Donald Trump’s 'travel bans' with an eye to the harvesting of personal data, and the EU-US Privacy Shield, now on life support.

Apathy about privacy is a myth: why users do care about data collection

The burden of protecting online privacy should be placed on corporations and governments, not on citizens.

How Facebook and the New York Times corporatised 'fake news'

We often talk about far-right US publishers or Macedonia’s fake news industry plaguing our media landscape. But there’s another fraud that too often goes unseen: ‘black ops advertising’.

Why Facebook’s fake news filter won’t work

A range of solutions  –  including stronger independent media organisations  –  is going to be needed.

Ethics, technology and human rights: navigating new roads

When we incorporate new technologies into human rights work, we need to be acutely aware of agency, participation and consent. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on data and human rights.

Taking the battle for civic space online

As online spaces become increasingly restricted, human rights activists must stay aware of the risks and benefits of technological developments. A contribution to openGlobalRights’ closing space for civil society debate. Español.

The EU must keep up with new technologies

Surveillance technologies infiltrating computer systems of human rights activists can result in their imprisonment or death. The EU needs to put greater emphasis on working with activists.

The link tax threatens the internet as we know it

The EU Commission's proposed copyright directive poses a threat to the internet's fundamental interconnectedness.

The future of US net neutrality under Trump

Administrative decisions related to the country’s telecommunications policy often go unnoticed by the majority of the US citizenry. But now, net neutrality in its purest form is in peril.

Cybersecurity should protect us – not control us

In the race to secure against threats, human rights such as privacy, free expression, freedom of assembly are undermined rather than protected.

Doing it the Malaysian way

Ever since the wake-up call of 2008, and with more and more Malaysians online, the ruling coalition is well aware that cyberspace is an important battleground, but chooses its battles.

Cooperativism in the digital era, or how to form a global counter-economy

Can we transform the renting economy of Uber and AirBnB into a genuine sharing one? Platform cooperatives must become open and commons-oriented.

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