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This week's editor

Constitutional conventions: best practice

The protests, natural disaster and the pressure of the international community.

Myanmar: the human-rights story behind the spin

The authorities in Nay Pyi Taw are steering the former authoritarian pariah state to open engagement with the world. Well, that’s what they say.

The Rohingya: bargaining with human lives

One year on from the violence of June 2012, new empirical evidence about the treatment of the Rohingya in Rakhine State, Burma, has taken the issue from the realms of international human rights and humanitarian law to that of international criminal law, says Amal de Chickera.

Stateless in Burma: Rohingya word wars

In order to understand how the ‘Rohingya crisis’ has come to pass we need to consider the narrative built by three groupings of international actors - the Burmese government, host countries for Rohingya who have fled and the international community at large.

Red lenses on a rainbow of revolutions

Given continued strikes in Iran and the freeing of Aung San Suu Kyi in Burma, neither the Burmese nor Iranian struggle for democracy is a story that should be characterized as an example of a failed movement and successful repression. But it is up to us - the global audience - to understand our responsibility in this dynamic.

Last stand for Burma's democracy movement?

Burma's ruling military junta are aggressively seeking to eliminate all opposition ahead of elections in 2010. They may well succeed, says Daniel Pye.  

Burma: sources of political change

What is the prospect for an end to Burma's long dictatorship? Twenty years after the suppression of the democratic movement in 1988, Joakim Kreutz looks at the faultlines and pressure-points of a complex political order.

(This article was first published on 27 August 2008)

Burma: waiting for the dawn

The democratic ideals of the "8-8-88" uprising remain the foundation of Burma's future, says Kyi May Kaung.

Burma's rage

On the twentieth anniversary of the pro-democracy uprising inBurma in 1988, the myth of control on which the Than Shwe regime relied on isgone. The mood is of rage. And hope.

Burma: cyclone, aid and sanctions

The debate over how to help Burma's people after cyclone Nargis must take account of the character of the country's military regime, says Wylie Bradford.

Burma: the cyclone and the referendum

The devastating cyclone across large areas of Burma changes the political landscape days before the regime's constitutional referendum scheduled for 10 May, says Aung Zaw of the online journal Irrawaddy.

Burma's revolt

The future of Burma is being decided on Rangoon's streets, as these stunning photos reveal
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