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“Francesc”

Francesc Badia i Dalmases is Editor and Director of democraciaAbierta.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

‘Second’ bank account: MPs demand probe into Rees-Mogg’s Brexit group

Cross-party demands for an urgent investigation into the financial affairs of the European Research Group follow openDemocracy’s investigation.

Why we're launching openMedia

Forget fake news. Money can distort media far more disturbingly – through advertorials, and through buying silence. Here’s what we’re doing about it.

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Philosophies of migration

Migration raises more fundamental questions than 'should these people be here': it probes into the very essence of what it means to be human, as well as how we define our communities.

Blowback: the failure of remote-control warfare

It all seemed so convenient: remote-control warfare would minimise military casualties while rendering the civilian dead invisible. But the battlefield has come home.

After the torture report—rebalancing the scales of justice

In the voluminous responses to the long-awaited US Senate committee report on torture by the CIA, the essence of what must follow—prosecutions, not pardons—has been buried.

After the Kenyatta case, how is the ICC to help victims?

The states party to the founding statute of the International Criminal Court must ensure victims of war crimes can receive redressin The Hague or at home.

The International Criminal Court must fix its anti-African image

The International Criminal Court is often presented as "racist" in Africa because of its focus on indictees from the continent. But the problem lies elsewhere.

Presumed guilty: the quiet human-rights scandal of pre-trial detention

Around the world, millions are effectively punished before they are tried and many are subjected to violence and even torture—at great social cost and although alternatives are available.

Egypt: time to end the diplomatic farce

Many Egyptians are smarting from the betrayal of their revolution while the military-backed regime tightens its grip. The international community can no longer ignore this.

Human Rights Watch on Rabaa: words aren’t loud enough

When words do not align with values, any crime can be justified.

The death of Abelhak Goradia: a worrying silence in France

The recent death of an Algerian national at the hands of the police during deportation should provoke public indignation. It demands explanation, says Nath Gbikpi.

No limits to brutality: deaths at the Greece-Turkey borders

People who fetch up at the borders between Greece and Turkey are treated as if they were less than human, in unaccountable operations for which the European Union must take responsibility.

Sri Lanka inquiry: a Tamil asylum-seeker speaks

As an international inquiry on the bloodshed in Sri Lanka in 2009 looms, one Tamil asylum-seeker explains why it matters to him.

Lords impede UK citizen-stripping move

In the latest episode in the UK government’s attempts to extend its power to strip UK citizens of their nationality, the House of Lords has thrown a spanner in the works.

British citizen, British justice?

The British home secretary can deprive of their citizenship individuals whose presence in the UK she deems “not conducive to the public good”. For one man, this has become a Kafkaesque nightmare.

Selling dictatorship

Liberal opinion has been outraged by the disclosures about US and UK electronic surveillance. Yet the most unpalatable revelation is that, in an unregulated capitalist economy, liberal democracy is always threatened with authoritarian regression.

Truth still eludes on UK involvement in rendition and torture

There have been repeated claims of UK complicity in the alleged torture of individuals detained abroad. The government’s latest move in the saga does not suggest a desire to get to the bottom of them.

Deported from Japan: until death do us part

February will see the final judgment in the case of Abubakar Awudu Suraj, a Ghanian national who died whilst being deported from Japan. An interview with his widow highlights States’ powers to regulate migrants' intimate relationships with their citizens.

Justice in the UK: back to the 1930s?

Proposals to cut legal aid and judicial review in Britain will make it harder for people fighting for their rights to challenge the government's cuts agenda, and will remove one of the few lifelines to justice for asylum seekers, refugees and undocumented workers, says Kate Blagojevic. 

The Rohingya: bargaining with human lives

One year on from the violence of June 2012, new empirical evidence about the treatment of the Rohingya in Rakhine State, Burma, has taken the issue from the realms of international human rights and humanitarian law to that of international criminal law, says Amal de Chickera.

Protests in Turkey: the straw that broke the camel’s back

Increasing monopolisation of power, patriarchal approach to government and a feeling of disenfranchisement by a significant portion of society in the absence of proper public deliberation and dialogue on a number of critical issues have caused massive public outrage. An open letter from five concerned Turkish citizens

Is China more democratic than Russia?

On paper, Russia’s political system is an impressive reproduction of Western representative democracy, while the Chinese system remains an unreconstructed autocracy. The reality of the situation is much more complex, says Ivan Krastev.

Le système éducatif tchadien en pleine décadence

91% de recalés à l’examen du baccalauréat 2012 au Tchad pour seulement 9% d’admis. Réorganiser le baccalauréat n’est pas la solution. Il faut revoir le système éducatif et sensibiliser les différents acteurs à une prise de conscience.

Education in Chad: in a state of decline

This year in Chad only 9% of students passed their high school leaving exams. Reorganising these exams is not the solution. We need to re-examine the whole education system, encouraging all those involved to wake up and take stock, says Kagbe Rachel.

Watching the watchers

Lack of co-operation on supervision of sovereign credit raters is undermining Rio+20’s pursuit of new Sustainable Development Goals

Humanitarian work: from intention to action

The performance of humanitarian agencies in meeting the needs of their presumed beneficiaries needs systematic improvement. The consistent practice of accountability must guide the change, says Nick van Praag.

Cinema, citizenship and the promise of the internet: a personal view from the Third World

Piracy is typically portrayed as the vice of only those who wish to steal media for the sake of self-indulgent entertainment. But 'file sharing' is also, for some, the only means of gaining access to educational material or information censored by oppressive governments, let alone revolutionary inspiration

The 'Democratic Recession' has turned into a modern zeitgeist of democratic reform

It is no coincidence that the wave of protests comes in the wake of a 'democratic recession'. People are increasingly demanding democracy in the Arab world, and also in the west.

Chinese companies under scrutiny in Zimbabwe

Ten years into the Look East policy, Zimbabwe is showing itself to be a not-so-satisfied customer of Chinese investment.

The material stakes in the Democratic Republic of the Congo elections

Private interest, not public voice, governs the immediate future of the DRC - the Democratic Republic of the Congo

SOS from a Congolese peacebuilder: rescue the young democracy of DR Congo!

There are concrete steps the Congolese political establishment can take to avert post-election violence, if external pressure helps to engender the necessary political will.

Armed conflict, land grabs and big business: Colombia’s deadly pact

The recent assassination of Colombian marxist insurgent group leader Alfonso Cano has been hailed internationally as an advance towards peace, giving Colombia a boost down the path to becoming the latest emerging market of Latin America. A closer look at the history and nature of Colombia's nearly 50 year-long armed struggle, however, tells us otherwise.

Resisting corruption: recent progress in Indonesia and Kenya

People power may be well-suited to a systemic approach to curbing corruption. Political will can be thwarted, because too many office-holders have a stake in the crooked status quo. Those benefiting from graft are much less likely to stand against it than those suffering from it.

Measuring corruption in Iraq: between perceptions and reality

The findings of the Corruption Perceptions Index are widely anticipated by governments whose credibility is at stake. But are they always reliable?

The Poet and the Tsar

When Putin sat down to tea with artists and musicians before a charity concert last month, he could not have expected difficult questions, writes Olga Sherwood. He had not counted on DDT's Yury Shevchuk, who found the courage to stand out from the crowd and launch a memorable and principled criticism of the current political course. The article was first published on July 1st, 2010
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