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Karama: Uniting to be each other's voice

After three years of constant debate, the Karama movement is finding a common language with which to speak, and a ‘voice' on international platforms. Jane Gabriel spoke to Hibaaq Osman, Karama's founder. Listen now.

Jane Gabriel
30 March 2009

After three years of constant debate, the Karama movement is finding a common language with which to speak and a ‘voice' on international platforms. Working to end violence against women across the Arab region, Karama is based in nine countries and has grown to collaborate with more than ninety different women's groups. Finding a way to make grassroots issues and priorities link to the agendas set by international organisations such as the United Nations and the World Bank remains a key challenge.

Jane Gabriel met up with Karama's founder, Hibaaq Osman, at the UN Commission on the Status of Women in New York where Hibaaq told her, "We've almost arrived, at least we know the way....our business now is making as many friends as we can". Listen now.

For an earlier podcast with Hibaaq Osman, see also  Empowering women in the Middle East

What happens when asylum seekers are sent back into danger?


Most countries closed their borders over the pandemic, but for asylum seekers, deportation continued all over the world. More and more often, they are returned to the same life-threatening conditions that they fled.

To mark World Refugee Day on 20 June, and the launch of our multimedia project 'Parallel Journeys', join us as we explore returns without reintegration.

Speakers to be announced soon.

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