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Making development work for women

What has happened to the argument for women's human rights in international policy? Rosalind Eyben of IDS, Maitrayee Mukhopadhyay of the Royal Tropical Insititute in the Netherlands and Helen O'Connell of One World Action spoke to Jane Gabriel.

Jane Gabriel
28 February 2008

International development policy over the past few years has shifted back to a focus on economic growth rather than a rights-based agenda. This has closed a "window of opportunity" opened in 1995 following the Beijing world conference on women, say many working for women's empowerment and gender equality.

At a recent conference hosted by the Institute of Development Studies (IDS), the discussion focused on women's economic and political empowerment, and how to reframe the argument.

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Jane Gabriel spoke to Rosalind Eyben of IDS, Maitrayee Mukhopadhyay of the Royal Tropical Insititute in the Netherlands and Helen O'Connell of One World Action, about what has happened to the argument for women's human rights in international policy. All members of the Pathways of Women's Empowerment RPC, they shared their views on the latest twists in a long struggle for gender equality.

Further reporting on the conference here, by Grace Davies.

This podcast is part of a series produced through a collaboration between openDemocracy and the Pathways of Women's Empowerment research consortium. You can listen to other podcasts in the series here, plus read articles and blog posts exploring the ideas, issues and projects of the research. The latest article in the series, published alongside this podcast is by Emily Esplen of IDS; "Men and gender justice: old debate, new perspectives".

Can there be a green populist project on the Left?

Many on the Left want to return to a politics of class, not populism. They point to Left populist parties not reaching their goals. But Chantal Mouffe argues that as the COVID-19 pandemic has put protection from harm at the top of the agenda, a Left populist strategy is now more relevant than ever.

Is this a chance to realign around a green democratic transformation?

Join us for a free live discussion on Thursday 22 October, 5pm UK time/12pm EDT.

Hear from:

Paolo Gerbaudo Sociologist and political theorist, director of the Centre for Digital Culture at King’s College London and author of ‘The Mask and the Flag: Populism and Global Protest’ and ‘The Digital Party: Political Organisation and Online Democracy’, and of the forthcoming ‘The Great Recoil: Politics After Populism and Pandemic’.

Chantal Mouffe Emeritus Professor of Political Theory at the University of Westminster in London. Her most recent books are ‘Agonistics. Thinking the World Politically’, ‘Podemos. In the Name of the People’ and ‘For a Left Populism’.

Spyros A. Sofos Researcher and research coordinator at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Lund University and author of ‘Nation and Identity in Contemporary Europe’, ‘Tormented by History’ and ‘Islam in Europe: Public Spaces and Civic Networks'.

Chair: Walid el Houri Researcher, journalist and filmmaker based between Berlin and Beirut. He is partnerships editor at openDemocracy and lead editor of its North Africa, West Asia project.

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