50.50

Making development work for women

What has happened to the argument for women's human rights in international policy? Rosalind Eyben of IDS, Maitrayee Mukhopadhyay of the Royal Tropical Insititute in the Netherlands and Helen O'Connell of One World Action spoke to Jane Gabriel.

Jane Gabriel
28 February 2008

International development policy over the past few years has shifted back to a focus on economic growth rather than a rights-based agenda. This has closed a "window of opportunity" opened in 1995 following the Beijing world conference on women, say many working for women's empowerment and gender equality.

At a recent conference hosted by the Institute of Development Studies (IDS), the discussion focused on women's economic and political empowerment, and how to reframe the argument.

Download & Listen

Jane Gabriel spoke to Rosalind Eyben of IDS, Maitrayee Mukhopadhyay of the Royal Tropical Insititute in the Netherlands and Helen O'Connell of One World Action, about what has happened to the argument for women's human rights in international policy. All members of the Pathways of Women's Empowerment RPC, they shared their views on the latest twists in a long struggle for gender equality.

Further reporting on the conference here, by Grace Davies.

This podcast is part of a series produced through a collaboration between openDemocracy and the Pathways of Women's Empowerment research consortium. You can listen to other podcasts in the series here, plus read articles and blog posts exploring the ideas, issues and projects of the research. The latest article in the series, published alongside this podcast is by Emily Esplen of IDS; "Men and gender justice: old debate, new perspectives".

How can Americans fight dark money and disinformation?

Violence, corruption and cynicism threaten America's flagging democracy. Joe Biden has promised to revive it – but can his new administration stem the flow of online disinformation and shady political financing that has eroded the trust of many US voters?

Hear from leading global experts and commentators on what the new president and Congress must do to stem the flood of dark money and misinformation that is warping politics around the world.

Join us on Thursday 21 January, 5pm UK time/12pm EST.

Hear from:

Emily Bell Leonard Tow Professor of Journalism and director, Tow Center for Digital Journalism, Columbia Journalism School

Anoa Changa Journalist focusing on electoral justice, social movements and culture

Peter Geoghegan openDemocracy investigations editor and author of 'Democracy for Sale: Dark Money and Dirty Politics'

Josh Rudolph Fellow for Malign Finance at the Alliance for Securing Democracy

Chair: Mary Fitzgerald Editor-in-chief, openDemocracy 

Further speakers to be announced

Get 50.50 emails Gender and social justice, in your inbox. Sign up to receive openDemocracy 50.50's monthly email newsletter.

Comments

We encourage anyone to comment, please consult the oD commenting guidelines if you have any questions.
Audio available Bookmark Check Language Close Comments Download Facebook Link Email Newsletter Newsletter Play Print Share Twitter Youtube Search Instagram WhatsApp yourData