László Bitó

László Bitó was born in Budapest, Hungary in 1934. In the communist dictatorship after WWII, his family was among the many thousands marked as bourgeoisie, reactionaries, enemies of the working class, and in 1951 they were deported to a small village in eastern Hungary. In ’54 László was drafted into a forced labour unit to work in a coal mine. In ’56 he and his comrades disarmed their guards to join the revolution, but when it was crushed he recognized that he could no longer live in the hopelessness of a returning dictatorship. Escaping from Hungary, he ended up in New York, where he earned a Ph.D. in Medical Cell Biology and Biophysics at Columbia University. He then joined Columbia’s Research faculty where his work led to the development of a new approach to the reduction of eye pressure that saved the sight of millions of glaucoma sufferers. Upon retirement from Columbia as Emeritus Professor, László Bitó returned to his native Hungary and has started a second career as a novelist and journalist.

See also www.laszlobito.com

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    Published in: Can Europe Make It?
    How Hungary can be led back to the path of liberal democracy
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    Written by: László Bitó All articles by László Bitó

    What has led Hungary down the path of an 'illiberal democracy', and how can a potential crisis within the EU be averted?

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    Published in: Home
    For Easter and Passover Holy Days: who crucified Jesus?
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    Written by: László Bitó All articles by László Bitó

    Preaching about love in the churches is not enough, as long as the words the worshippers read in their Bible turn them against people of other faiths and fill them with suspicion, dislike, loathing, hatred, aversion or revulsion. It is not enough to talk about tolerance as long as the holy scriptures set us apart.

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    Published in: Home
    The voice of liberal democracy needs to be preserved in Hungary
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    Written by: László Bitó All articles by László Bitó

    When the Media Law of the authoritarian Hungarian government meets with strident criticism in the free press of the world, and from heads of established democracies, as a major attack on the freedom of speech, Prime Minister Viktor Orbán and his people ask for time, arguing against the avalanche of criticisms that no one should assume that the Media Council established in 2010 will abuse the unheard of powers with which it was endowed until it has shown an inclination to do so. Meanwhile they are eager to export their ideas.

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    Published in: Home
    Hungary's struggles for freedom and democracy
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    Written by: László Bitó All articles by László Bitó

    The greatest concern with regard to EU criticism aimed at influencing the political course of Hungary is that without a good understanding of the political realities, even the best intentions may unintentionally play into the hands of Jobbik. Meanwhile Government statements are meant to convince those who are disturbed by the usurpation of power to give up all hope for the next forty years. Now the situation is more complex and in a way more precarious than in 1956.

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