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Fighting for a thousand euros in Ukraine’s metal industry

16 May 2019 Hanna Sokolova

Workers at metallurgical and mining companies in Kryvyi Rih, one of Ukraine’s largest industrial cities, have been holding mass protests since 2017.

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