openDemocracyUK

A people’s agenda for change

POWER2010's campaign - which generated over 100,000 votes from the British public - has produced a critical checklist of ordinary people's priorities for political change.
Pam Giddy
24 February 2010

POWER2010's campaign - which generated over 100,000 votes from the British public - has produced a critical checklist of ordinary people's priorities for political change.

The most popular proposals that will make up the POWER Pledge are a proportional voting system, the end of ID cards and government data hoarding, an elected House of Lords, English votes on English laws, and a commitment to drawing up a written constitution. 

The next general election looks like being the closest run for many years - where candidates stand on these issues could make a massive difference.

This campaign sends the clearest possible message to the political classes that it is time to listen to the people's demands.

100,000 votes were cast - and we expect many thousands of people across the country to pledge their support before the election.

Some of the ideas that proved popular with the public will surprise many.

In particular a commitment to give MPs representing English constituencies the sole right to agree English laws.

But whether you agree with this or not, there is no denying that it is a real issue that the political classes have ignored for too long.

We've taken the campaign to towns and cities across the country and everywhere heard the same thing: it's time to fix our political system, not fiddle it.

The vote shows that voters CAN make difficult choices about political reform.

People have chosen 5 distinct and important reforms, any or all of which would make a major difference to our political system.

We're going to keep up the pressure until election day to make sure the people who want to represent us in parliament take these results seriously and back our campaign for change. 

Sign the Power Pledge here

Sign the petition: save our Freedom of Information

The UK government is running a secretive unit inside Michael Gove’s Cabinet Office that’s accused of ‘blacklisting’ journalists and hiding ‘sensitive’ information from the public. Experts say they’re breaking the law – and it’s an assault on our right to know what our government is doing.

We’re not going to let it stand. We’re launching a legal battle – but we also need a huge public outcry, showing that thousands back our call for transparency. Will you add your name?

Who is bankrolling Britain's democracy? Which groups shape the stories we see in the press; which voices are silenced, and why? Sign up here to find out.

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