openDemocracyUK

Was Kelly Killed? A question that may put Chilcott in the shade

Anthony Barnett
Anthony Barnett
6 December 2009

After I read Norman Baker's book on The Strange Death of David Kelly I was convinced that he was probably killed - and not by his own hand. Baker's own theory of who did it struck me as implausable and the book is uneven and frustrating and includes unworthy inuendoes. But the defining and scandalous fact is this: there was no coronor's inquest into what was a highly significant death. We know that Blair took us to war and misled the country to justify his decision. We don't know why and how Kelly, the UK's foremost active weapons inspector in Iraq who hated Saddam and also hated the way the evidence to justify invasion was being tampered with, died. Now there is what seems like a full scale attempt by six medical professionals to demand an inquest. There is a story in The Telegraph here and a stronger one by Tim Shipman of the Mail here. Shipman reports:

in a 13-page dossier prepared as the basis for the legal action, the doctors argue that the bleeding from Dr Kelly's ulnar artery in his left wrist is "highly unlikely" to have caused his death. They say a number of studies have shown that it is unusual for a patient to die from a single deep cut to the wrist.

The Mail also reproduces "six question that have still to be answered". Read them and ask for answers.

The left is often so frightened of being charged with 'conspiracy' theories that it can back away when there is a genuine case for one.

Stop the secrecy: Publish the NHS COVID data deals


To: Matt Hancock, Secretary of State for Health and Social Care

We’re calling on you to immediately release details of the secret NHS data deals struck with private companies, to deliver the NHS COVID-19 datastore.

We, the public, deserve to know exactly how our personal information has been traded in this ‘unprecedented’ deal with US tech giants like Google, and firms linked to Donald Trump (Palantir) and Vote Leave (Faculty AI).

The COVID-19 datastore will hold private, personal information about every single one of us who relies on the NHS. We don’t want our personal data falling into the wrong hands.

And we don’t want private companies – many with poor reputations for protecting privacy – using it for their own commercial purposes, or to undermine the NHS.

The datastore could be an important tool in tackling the pandemic. But for it to be a success, the public has to be able to trust it.

Today, we urgently call on you to publish all the data-sharing agreements, data-impact assessments, and details of how the private companies stand to profit from their involvement.

The NHS is a precious public institution. Any involvement from private companies should be open to public scrutiny and debate. We need more transparency during this pandemic – not less.


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