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This week’s front page editor

Adam Bychawski

Adam Bychawski is an editorial assistant at openDemocracy.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Partnership or power projection? The EU and its 'neighbourhood'

The EU is advancing its image as a 'benevolent neighbour' and 'democracy promoter.' Is this a reflection of reality, or good public relations?

Islamophobia, a foreseeable consequence of ultra-liberalism?

Islamophobia does not result from a specific strategy to create the ideal scapegoat, but Muslims came in opportunely to fulfil this function within ultra-liberal European societies.

Life after Europe: the Post-Europe Project

The joint editors of Europe – the very idea introduce the next stage of their project – a discussion inspired by the Czech philosopher and political dissident Jan Patočka. An invitation to discussion.

Hungary: ruling in the guise of democracy

After 1989, within two decades, the hitherto ‘dormant’ authoritarian, leader-worshipping, order-obsessed right-wing mentality has gradually found its way to the surface. Its institutional shape is precisely impossible to define.

25 years after the fall of Communism: a call

When much of the world pays no lip service to democratic values, it would be a great disaster if countries in the heart of Europe were to turn away.

The collapse of the USSR and the illusion of progress

The collapse of the USSR was the occasion for much rejoicing. But 25 years later, there is not much to cheer about.

 

Europe, the EU and European identity

European identity was the negative construct of a Europe torn apart by world war. It was a negative outcome of an attempt to forge a European identity in the Cold War, squeezed, as Europe was, by the rivalry of the USA and USSR. But negative cultural formation cannot carry the day.

Stasi or NSA?

Which spy agency would you choose to monitor your life, asks Goran Fejic.

Delegation to Berlin

To mark the anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, we have a true story from its early days. It is about a young man's rites of passage, but also an era of deception, self-deception and co-option, when those who made the journey to the other side could be turned by the Cold War into weapons.

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