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This week’s World Forum for Democracy 2017 editors

Georgios Kolliarakis

Georgios Kolliarakis political scientist, is a senior researcher at the University of Frankfurt.

Rosemary Belcher-2.jpg

Rosemary Bechler is openDemocracy’s Editor.

Introducing this week’s theme: Media, parties and populism.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

The many Brexits of Bristol

Bristol strongly supported Remain but not all of its component parts did. Ward-level data reveals who voted for what, why, and thus how we might move forward as a community.

What will Brexit mean for the future of European student mobility?

The UK government's stance on immigration will likely cost British students their access to Erasmus+. How will UK universities keep their students thinking globally post-Brexit?

How can we resist post-Brexit racism?

What does one do when they feel their home turning against them?

Automatic transformation of EU citizenship rights is the way forward

The British Home Office has created a bureaucratic nightmare for EU citizens applying for permanent residency. Might there be a better way forward?

Bristol, Brexit and the creative challenge

Bristol’s creative industries give the city a strong starting point for taking the city global post-Brexit. But it will need support to succeed.

Brexit and unemployment: where bureaucracy becomes brutal

Receiving jobseeker’s allowance isn’t enough for EEA nationals to prove they are looking for work. But if that’s not sufficient, what is?

Brexit, Bristol and business

Business was never unified on its stance towards Brexit, and very few assessments have studied how it will affect local economies.Might Bristol be the place to start?

Making sense of Brexit: foreigners in defence of foreigners’ rights

There are a reported three million EU citizens and more than five million non-EU citizenships in Britain. Why aren’t they organising ahead of the election?

Neighbourhood responses to Brexit challenges

“Taking back control”, they said. If that means being active citizens and active listeners, there may be hope.

#BristolBrexit: a city responds to Brexit

Uncertainty is plaguing the transition to a post-Brexit Britain. Cities can, and must, address it head on in ways that work best for them.

Brexit and the banks

Several cities are vying to replace London as Europe's financial capital post-Brexit. What will make banks leave, and what will make banks stay?

What will Brexit mean for London’s tech industry and digital entrepreneurs?

Brexit won’t destroy the high-tech startup industry in London, but it could inflict a lot of damage on it.

The challenges of negotiating a post-Brexit FTA with the EU

While an UK-EU free trade agreement (FTA) may seem the best way forward, the scope of a comprehensive agreement along with the time and capacity needed to conclude it makes that a difficult sell. 

Four myths about Brexit and financial services

UK-based finance firms will need far more than just ‘passporting’ rights to keep up their operations in the EU after Brexit, and the government will likely want something in return.

Brexit: Ireland stands to lose most

Brexit is especially dangerous for the UK-Irish relationship. Government and business need to work together during the negotiations or both economies will suffer.

The dominance of Brexonomics

Fundamental political questions about the character and outlook of a post-Brexit Britain need to be answered before we worry about the specificities of economic sectors and trade relationships.

The business of Brexit: how companies make decisions in uncertain political times

Business has mixed feelings over Brexit, and a relatively small number of factors can explain why.

The economy after Brexit: encouragingly resilient or still a case of ‘wait and see’?

The British economy has not suffered the dire consequences projected prior to the referendum. Were the pessimists wrong, is it a delayed reaction, or are there other forces at work?

Introducing this week's theme: UK business and trade after Brexit

The economy will be centre stage when Brexit negotiations begin in 2017. All week we’re looking at the possible consequences of different types of Brexit on specific sectors and the economy as a whole.

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