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This week’s front page editor

Claire Provost

Claire Provost is editor of 50.50 covering gender, sexuality and social justice.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Football, Politics, Society


Academies of hatred

A series of public events in Wrocław, Poland’s European Capital of Culture in 2016, have been disrupted by radicals. Those responsible are not only supported by the main right-wing opposition party. They have also received strong material support from the present Polish government.

Proud to be German? Football and the fear of nationalism

Though some fans are enthusiastic, even proud of today's multi-ethnic, multi-racial German football teams, taking pride in Germany is troubled by the historic affiliation of nationalism and racism.

Football in Turkey: A force for liberalisation and modernity?

The relationship between football and society in Turkey is unique and complex. Behind the corruption and fanaticism lies a culture that is challenging outdated social attitudes and leading Turkey's European aspirations.

"Red Star Serbia, never Yugoslavia!" Football, politics and national identity in Serbia

In the years before the war football fans from the former Yugoslavia had a sort of premilitary training in the stadia. Soon they would exchange the flags and banners for rifles and bombs.

Time to show Israel the red card, says Palestinian footballer

There has been a sad catalogue of children falling victim to Israeli bullets and shells while playing football in the "wrong" place.

Football, politics and protest in Brazil

The protests on the streets of Brazilian cities are by no means anti-Brazil (or even anti-football). Rather, they are unquestionably patriotic: people believe that Brazilian public education, healthcare, and democracy should be every bit as admirable as the national football team.

The Nation's Most Holy Institution: football and the construction of Croatian national identity

More than religion or war, it is football that is uniquely shaping Croatian national identity in a post-Yugoslav world

Football, fascism and the British

Sunderland manager Di Canio has apparently finally distanced himself from fascism. What can we learn from the furore, about power and sport, politics and the personal, and the UK's relationship to fascist ideology?

'My Turkey': Berlin, immigration and the amateur football scene

Berlin's Turkish football clubs tell the tale of a local struggle for multiculturalism and integration, far away from the politics of migration.

Not enjoying the football. But ever interested by it

Is football racist to its core? The author starts out having thought so, but his experience of a particular group of joyful fans makes him wonder whether an inclusive tribalism might not be possible - even desirable

Football & politics: the legacy of Euro 2012 in Ukraine

Ahead of the Euro 2012 football championships, media attention on political scandal and excessive profiteering has undermined Ukrainian attempts to raise prestige in the eyes of the world. Janek Lasocki and Łukasz Jasina wonder if the hosts will eventually be able to defy critics and secure a positive legacy from the tournament.

Dangerous allies: when football hooligans and politicans meet

Football hooliganism occurs in societies all over the world - even in the Soviet Union, however much that was officially denied. In today’s Russia, however, football fanaticism has developed clear political undertones, with evidence that some groups have been colluding with the Kremlin against its opponents. Is this a ticking timebomb? wonders Mikhail Loginov

The Police International vs Russia’s football fans

As Russia’s largest and best organised ‘horizontal’ community in Russia, football fans have found themselves at the centre of governmental attempts to control informal groups, write Irina Borogan and Andrei Soldatov. Perhaps more surprisingly, they have also become guinea pigs for international data exchange programmes, with Russian authorities picking up the very worst of surveillance practices from their foreign colleagues.

Football as a catalyst for patriotism

As Russia becomes sports mad, Lyubov Borusyak explores the complex relationship of the Russians to their national identity, to losing and winning, and the fall and rise of their country

The rise of Russia and its football

As Moscow prepares to host an iconic Champions League final between Manchester United and Chelsea, Marc Bennetts turns a spotlight on the unknown world of Russian football.
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