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This week’s editors

“Francesc”

Francesc Badia i Dalmases is Editor and Director of democraciaAbierta.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

الإعلام في مصيدة الإيديولوجيا

الرفض لإعلام المواطن ينطوي على أزمة مفادها؛ أن الإعلام التقليدي يرفض تمثيل الناس لأنفسهم، بل ويصرّ على الضلوع في إنتاج هوية جمعية يرفضها العامة والغالبية.

"التنمر الإلكتروني" في أوساط السوريين: فهم خاطئ أم أسلوب حياة؟

الحرب ليست نزهة نخرج منها بصحة نفسية أفضل، إلا أن هذا ليس مبرراً للتحول إلى وحوش. ومجرد أنك لا ترى دم ضحيتك لا يعني بالضرورة أنك لم تقتلها.

How human rights are freeing journalists in Turkey – a prison for members of the press

Though some from Turkey's independent newspaper Cumhuriyet are still being detained, human rights mechanisms are being used successfully – even in this autocracy – to free many others.

Vicariously offended: the Dawkins controversy and the absence of Muslim voices

The only way to have a leverage in current debates around Islam is to have many strong and effective voices, to the extent that Muslim voices become indispensable.

You must respect fear

"The best protection that a journalist can have is probably to keep on publishing stuff, to keep on waging a public battle." Interview. Español Português

Blogging at the time of dictatorship

The Tunisian Internet Agency is responsible for harming national memory. Questions need to be answered and those responsible need to be held accountable.

UAE: when tweets become a matter of national security

Think twice before you speak in the UAE, you could end up spending 25 years in jail next time you tweet.

Attacks on civil society in Turkey, human rights and solidarity

Protests and a show of strength demonstrate the importance of challenging a state that reverts to the arbitrary exercise of power.

10 years on: Jordan’s anti-terrorism law and the crackdown on dissent

It is now time that the authorities stop labelling all those who dare speak their minds as “terrorists”.

Giulio Regeni, Egypt, and the deafening silence of Europe

Giulio Regeni's case is not only about academic freedom, but about the responsibility of EU states to protect their citizens: silence cannot be the response to his torture and murder.

French secularism as failed social engineering

The principle of laïcité has become a demagogic tool to reinforce narrow judgements about French identity and discriminate against minorities. 

Dealing with Muslim dissent

The solution to extremism lies through strategies that enable rather than constrain the space for Muslim free expression.

Seven trends dominating Egyptian media

Egypt’s media outlets are trapped in a web of biases. Seven trends have dominated the country's media landscape over the past two years.

Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression but conditions apply

Rayna Stamboliyska

Egypt has jailed journalists by the dozen; the Gulf is jailing people for tweets they send and surveillance companies are gearing them up. One does not need a crystal ball to see that repressive states in the MENA region will continue to suppress dissent.

Lebanese media retaliates against politicians' crackdown

A video of a talk show recently went viral in Lebanon in defence of freedom of expression. This should send a warning signal to media outlets across the country about what is taking place behind the scenes.

Journalism is not terrorism

In Egypt, numerous journalists have been arrested since the overthrow of Morsi. They are being kept in high security prisons under appalling conditions. Egypt Solidarity Initiative are campaigning for their release as they go on trial today.

Tunisian journalist Fahem Boukadous on press freedom

Fahem Boukadous, an outspoken critic of Tunisia’s record on press freedom, speaks about the political challenges facing Tunisia, three years after the Jasmine Revolution which ended the repressive regime of Ben Ali. Interview by Malachy Browne.

Egypt’s mythical ‘law and order’

The Egyptian authorities appear to be more concerned with how to curb their opponents than they are with the future of the country and the wellbeing of its citizens.

Jailing of journalist exposes shortcomings of reforms in Morocco

If the goal of Moroccan officials is to silence Anouzla, their attempts have been fruitless thus far, as more and more activists and international organizations adopt his case and propagate the same articles Moroccans are trying to suppress.

Globe-trotting universities serve diplomacy and markets, not democracy

American liberal arts colleges are embracing collaborations with authoritarian regimes worldwide, with implications for US foreign policy. Following up his op-ed in the New York Times on Sunday, Jim Sleeper reports on the issue in greater depth in this openDemocracy essay. 

India is ready for change, but censorship, taxation and corruption plagued the Art Fair

Mixed news from the fine art scene in India. The fourth annual Indian Art Fair was hailed as a great success, but censorship issues can restrain artists and curators in subtle ways — logistically as well as creatively
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