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Constitutional conventions: best practice

The UK government spied on human rights groups – now they’re taking it to court

After human rights groups challenged the government for its mass surveillance infrastructure, they were themselves illegally spied on. Illegal state spying jeopardises all our freedoms, and must be stopped.

The end of anonymity? Trump and the tyranny of the majority

Worldwide, there is an administration-sanctioned attack on anonymity, online and off.

Do we still need human judges in the age of Artificial Intelligence?

Technology and the law are converging, but what does that mean for justice?

The future of the internet depends on you

People from the freedom of expression, privacy and media development communities must get engaged, to ensure that one of the most important communications platforms ever invented remains open, pluralistic and democratic.

Digital skills in academia: let’s CryptoParty!

The question of how to secure research data in times of large-scale online surveillance remains unaddressed. CryptoParties might offer a preliminary solution. 

An alternative take on alternative facts

Trump is right: we should be dealing in alternative facts – they have important work to do. 

The future of US net neutrality under Trump

Administrative decisions related to the country’s telecommunications policy often go unnoticed by the majority of the US citizenry. But now, net neutrality in its purest form is in peril.

Privacy and Data Protection Day: restoring trust for digital citizens

The web has made our world increasingly borderless, and digital security should be borderless too, not just a privilege of those who can afford it. 

The Facebook President: fact trumps fiction

Did Facebook really turn Hillary Clinton from POTUS 45 into Al Gore 2016?

Small steps in the struggle for digital rights?

In this rapidly expanding internet, the kinds of rights we need are often difficult to pin down – though pin them down we must if they are to be protected.

Whose data is it anyway?

Collection, categorisation, and experimentation on people’s data are presented as legitimate because online advertising is funding the free internet. But what about privacy, free expression, and autonomy?

Listen to a recorded audio version of this article courtesy of curio.io.

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