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This week’s editor

Alex Sakalis, Editor

Alex Sakalis is associate editor of openDemocracy and co-edits the Can Europe Make It? page.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Bought and paid for – how Romania’s media is pressured by corporate and political masters

Journalists in Romania failing to conform to pressure from private companies and advertisers face intimidation and risk losing their jobs.

Turkey’s coup failed everywhere, except in Egyptian media

Egypt's media welcomed, unabashedly, the Turkish military coup; prematurely hailing Erdogan’s overthrow.

Shame on those who try to justify Giulio Regeni’s assassination

Claims that Regeni’s supervisors bear responsibility for sending him into danger are outrageous, betraying both ignorance of the facts and a severe lack of empathy.

Does the media say too much when reporting on terrorism?

News coverage of investigations into terrorist attacks raise concerns about whether the media goes too far in reporting police findings that may be of some help to bloodthirsty fundamentalists.

From Beirut to Paris, we are all hypocrites and selective grievers

In legitimately condemning selective grief, Lebanon (and the world) forgets that it selectively grieves all the time. We must acknowledge our ineptitude at dealing with human suffering and show solidarity with all.  عربي

The violence of the word refugee

Words have power. The meaning of the word ‘refugee’ must be challenged to represent the experiences of the millions of individuals who have lost everything and yet wake up each day seeking to build a better life for themselves.

Turkey: media crackdown amid escalating violence

At the very moment that critical independent media are needed most in Turkey, we are witnessing a renewed crackdown on media freedom.

The problem with the 'women of ISIL'

Deeply problematic media narratives on Islam and women go unchallanged, distracting from the difficult questions and warping perceptions directly involved in justifying western military intervention in the Middle East.

North Sinai and Egyptian media

Early on 1 July, an Islamic State affiliate started a massive and unprecedented attack in Egypt. Once again, the media is failing to verify the information it spreads.

Missing journalists: Tunisia’s Arab Spring meets Libya’s

Two radically different “Arab Springs” have collided in the ordeal of two Tunisian journalists in Libya.

Only in Egypt’s media: women raped because the “guys were having a good time”

A long battle lies ahead. People need to start taking responsibility and stop trying to find scapegoats, whether the Muslim Brotherhood, the culture, women’s clothing’s, etc… We all need to stand side by side and make Egypt's streets safer for women.

Syria: when representational violence is as ruthless as political violence

Our representations of what happens in Syria contribute to the ongoing violence. The rhetoric allows the self-nominated international community to rationalise an ongoing structure of suffering, done with the best of intentions.

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Decode the article on http://www.altphabet.org/?art=uk01

Journalism is not terrorism

In Egypt, numerous journalists have been arrested since the overthrow of Morsi. They are being kept in high security prisons under appalling conditions. Egypt Solidarity Initiative are campaigning for their release as they go on trial today.

Lords report does little to weaken media barons

Despite some positive noises the Lords Communications Committee's recent report does not go nearly far enough to address Britain's dysfunctional media.

Media plurality - Schlosberg responds

The final installment of the conversation, here Justin Schlosberg responds to Rob Kenny's article.

The impact of a 20% media ownership cap – not so ‘minor’

Rob Kenny responds to Justin Schlosberg's article on media plurality published here.

Media Plurality debate: new research models proposed ownership limits

Based on his latest research that examined civil society proposals for media plurality measures and models their suggested ownership limits against current market conditions, Justin Schlosberg of Birkbeck, University of London argues that such limits and thresholds could limit media power with minimal impact on the market. 

One satirist exposes Egypt's lopsided media viewpoint

Nowadays it’s hard to find any national newspaper, TV channel, radio station, or even website that avowedly criticizes the government or the military.

Egypt's most powerful man tries to tame the media

To reconcile two different media perspectives of him, General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, commander of the armed forces, has resorted to attempting to control Egypt's media himself.

Jailing of journalist exposes shortcomings of reforms in Morocco

If the goal of Moroccan officials is to silence Anouzla, their attempts have been fruitless thus far, as more and more activists and international organizations adopt his case and propagate the same articles Moroccans are trying to suppress.

Sudan: journalists strike amid deadly demos

The most active journalists in Khartoum are either being summoned, arrested, told what to say or are resigning.

This week's window on the Middle East - October 2, 2013

Arab Awakening's columnists offer their weekly perspective on what is happening on the ground in the Middle East. Leading the week, Sudan: a revolution in the making?

Egypt shuts down more media channels

The vaunted reputation of the military-led government for neutrality is rather easily exposed, when we realise that the decision to close Al-Faraeen came only after Okasha's harsh criticism of both the Egyptian Defence Minister and the Minister of Information.

Broadcasting for Scotland

Scotland's bid for autonomy is also a chance to build an independent media, one that is not based in London and puts Scottish perspectives first.

A complicated relationship: Libya, Syria and the international press

The decision whether to intervene militarily in Syria should not be dictated by non-information, nor should the success or failure of Libya's revolution (and NATO's role in it) be prematurely judged on the same basis.

Journalism in Syria is fast becoming a one-way ticket to death

Journalists report the news - but who reports on their safety?

Belarusian Warsaw – ghetto or gilded cage?

For twenty years Alyaksandr Lukashenka, president of Belarus, has ruled with an iron hand, and ruined the economy; and still there is no sign of the screws loosening. Meanwhile, as Annabelle Chapman reports, his country has seen a brain drain of young talented Belarusians, many of them to neighbouring Poland.

Egypt in the balance: what the blogs are saying 28 August - 8 September

This Arab Awakening space for excerpts of articles, blogs and tweets is a weekly holding operation for those trying to work out what is happening. The 'You tell us' feature offers some first hand accounts and a range of opinions, first and foremost from the people of Egypt.

Where to stand in the Fourth Estate

Attacks on the Guardian's supposed hypocrisy conflates public scrutiny with gossip and entertainment. 

Egypt to its journalists: Turn a blind eye, or adopt our viewpoint!

The State Information Service objects to the fact that some media "are still falling short of describing the (anti-Morsi protests) of June 30 as an expression of a popular will."

A militarized media in Egypt: a dirty war making many of us blind

The people will soon see the “true colours” of SCAF – or will they? It depends where they get their information from.

In Ukraine, it grows on trees ...

Ever since becoming Ukraine’s president in 2010, Viktor Yanukovych has been preparing for his next election in 2015 – and this time he intends to win without the support of the oligarchs. But he needs cash, lots of it, and this, as Sergii Leshchenko reports, is where "self-made" Serhiy Kurchenko comes in.

On Al-Jazeera's lopsided coverage of Egypt

Al-Jazeera has not only lost much of its credibility, but the credibility of its main backer and benefactor, Qatar.

Keeping calm and carrying on

St Petersburg's Regional Press Institute has defended Russian media rights for the last two decades. Like other similar organisations, it has been subjected to various forms of governmental harassment, but has managed to keep going. Director Anna Sharogradskaya tells the story

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