Our partners

We would like to thank the Mulberry Trust, the Network for Social Change and Fritt Ord for their generous support of our work.

Support Arab Awakening

If you would like to support the work of the Arab Awakening editors, please get in touch with the Editor: Rosemary Bechler

Bahrain on Arab Awakening

You tell us

We want to meet you. We hope that as you read what others have to say you will be inspired to share your own thoughts with us. Whether it is a passing observation that means something to you about how your life has changed in these months, or an extended essay to work out your ideas for the future, we want to hear from you.

« Return to Arab Awakening

Articles

  •  

Whatever is happening to the Egyptians?

The socio-economic gap is widening, and taking an ideological and cultural form. This comes as no surprise, because unity makes people a threat to power.

Palestinian unity: a dream buried deep?

Neither Fatah nor Hamas are willing to accept power sharing, and the division between them is no longer merely ideological in nature.

Amendments to Sudanese criminal law

Walaa Salah

Amendments don't mean change. It’s high time for a comprehensive campaign against the entire legal system, calling for dignity and equality for all.

Sudan and Operation Decisive Storm

Major opposition parties in Sudan boycotted the elections that took place earlier this month, but are now supporting the government's decision to join Operation Decisive Storm disregarding the effect this will have on the people of Yemen.

Our otherness: imagining Balkan and mid-Eastern identities

Rayna Stamboliyska

The original quote by Orwell is “He who controls the past controls the future. He who controls the present controls the past”. In just two sentences, he has embraced our fate.

Final observations on Israeli elections

The question remains, even if Netanyahu can form a workable government, can he repair the damage he has done to Israeli society and to his own and the State of Israel’s image.

Women and the Arab Spring: a dream turned nightmare

Change must start from within each individual. As quoted in the Quran, “Indeed, Allah will not change the condition of a people until they change what is in themselves.”  

Where are the people of Syria?

To mark the fourth anniversary of the uprising, the people of Syria tell their stories. 

Gaza fishing industry held hostage at sea

Since the ceasefire agreement last August, fisherman in Gaza are facing increasing restrictions that are threatening their livelihoods. 

What’s in a name? A second report on the Israeli elections

There has been some interesting rebranding of Israeli political parties in honor of the forthcoming election. Political campaigning on Israeli TV is restricted prior to the election, but clever ways are being found to bypass the rules.

The Islamic State's arrival in Gaza

With a never-ending siege on Gaza, the economic capacity of Palestinians has shrunk to an unbearable limit where families struggle to feed their children. A breeding ground is thereby created for extremism and radical ideologies. 

The reproduction of authoritarian politics in the AKP era

Turkey has passed the blurred threshold that demarcates democratic politics from an authoritarian system. 

The Coptic Church: mixing politics with religion

Mina Fayek

To mourn the unjustly massacred and raise your voice against oppressors is unwelcome in the Coptic Church, but to interrupt prayers and let politicians speak during a mass is welcome and appropriate.

The Egyptian lesson: how to strengthen student opposition

In a country choked with ironies, the Egyptian regime might just be building up the new student opposition that it is trying to eliminate.

Some observations on the forthcoming Israeli elections

The first polls taken after the election process was set in motion showed that Netanyahu was not seen as popular. So why did Netanyahu call for elections now?

(Syrian) black skin, (Lebanese) white masks

Refugees in Lebanon face a violent troika: the state, the Lebanese bourgeoisie, and the weather.

This week's window on the Middle East - December 16, 2014

Arab Awakening's columnists offer their weekly perspective on what is happening on the ground in the Middle East. Leading the week: Who cheered Mubarak’s acquittal on?

The life of an American freelancer in the Middle East

There is an urgent need to change the narrative of the region and shift focus from bloodshed, terrorism, religious, sectarian and tribal threats to more in-depth coverage on the ground.

Who cheered Mubarak’s acquittal on?

Mina Fayek

Less than four years have passed since the people of Egypt revolted against a tyrannical regime. Those tyrants have had all charges against them dropped, to many people's dismay.

When the people wanted to bring down the Syrian regime: Hezbollah as a counter-revolutionary proxy

The fruits of heroic resistance are feeding regional interests rather than the people that resisted. The proxy role of Islamic resistance is becoming a bargaining tool in regional diplomacy.

For history’s sake, the Arab peoples have revolted

Not only did the Arab peoples revolt, but the power of their revolts was so significant and threatening to the regional geopolitical order that the regional powers had to diffuse the collective consciousness at any cost.

Tabit and sexual violence in Darfur

Darfur has practically been closed off to journalists, politicians and independent civil society organizations, and sexual violence and rape have now become a reality in women's day-to-day lives.

The refutation of the Djerejian doctrine

When, rarely, Middle East elections take place, the Djerejian doctrine seems confirmed. But it is the west who only endorse one vote at one time, when the results serve its interests.

This week's window on the Middle East - November 3, 2014

Arab Awakening's columnists offer their weekly perspective on what is happening on the ground in the Middle East. Leading the week: A Syrian fearing exile and return.

Is justice blind in Egypt?

Yara Sallam might be just one more name to add to the list of people wronged by the Egyptian justice system. But more importantly, she is one more name temporarily taken off an ever shrinking list of those fighting against all odds to correct injustice. 

Can the Arab world defeat ISIS?

Maged Mandour

What will three forces contribute to the defeat of ISIS: Arab autocrats, moderate Islamist groups and secular democratic protest movements - the first initiators of the Arab Revolt? We can discount the first...

When the US chooses terrorism

IS was created by lack of justice, dignity and governance. Instead of tackling these root issues, the US chose to target the outcomes through brutal terrorism to maintain its hegemonic power structure in the region. 

ISIS airstrikes: between imperialism and orientalism

Maged Mandour

Islamic radicalism is the product of societal developments and it is not directly related to the religion of Islam. The lessons of Iraq are being actively ignored by the US and the west in general. The main tenets of American foreign policy, which have done well for extremism, are unchanged.

Three years on and the Copts' plight continues

Mina Fayek

Three years after the Maspero massacre, no justice has been served. This was a state crime, and more worryingly, the Egyptian state seems to be increasingly engaging in hostile acts towards Copts.

The obliteration of civil society in Egypt

If the NGO law is passed and enforced, human rights groups will have to request permission from the government to collect and document the human rights violations committed by the government. Egypt’s second evaluation is scheduled for October 2014.

ISIS airstrikes: how to rehabilitate dictators and destroy the revolution

Maged Mandour

The American intervention will strengthen the hand of Arab autocrats against their opponents, Islamists and non-Islamists alike. It lends credibility to the 'war against terror' rhetoric that these regimes use as a suppressant to the revolution.

This week's window on the Middle East - September 24, 2014

Arab Awakening's columnists offer their weekly perspective on what is happening on the ground in the Middle East. Leading the week, Anti-Syrian sentiment in Lebanon.

On structural violence in Palestine

The structural violence, economic inequalities, and pervasive injustice that characterise Palestinian society under occupation have created a crisis of the spirit.

Anti-Syrian sentiment in Lebanon

Lebanese nationalism has historically been exclusionary - as are all nationalisms - and isolationist, in that it accentuates differences between the Lebanese and other Levantines or other Arabs while downplaying shared attributes and characteristics.

Tripoli airstrikes

Maged Mandour

These airstrikes demonstrate new fault lines in the Arab world: between Arab conservative regimes, their Islamist foes, and the democratic secular forces who find themselves in an impossible situation. 

Syndicate content