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Grenfell tower

Grenfell tower: where are the missing?

On 14th June 2017 in the London borough of Kensington and Chelsea, Grenfell Tower caught on fire, killing at least 80 people and injuring at least 70. Exact figures are yet to come to light, and many residents of Grenfell are still without homes. At openDemocracy we have been inundated with submissions about this terrible event, which many people are calling "social murder".


Words of fire

The language of resistance is resourceful, creative and deep. After Grenfell, the words of those affected ring out clearly and truly – showing up the shallow contempt of those by whom they are governed.

Grenfell tower and the people without capital

Contempt for Grenfell residents is representative of the way the city of London treats its global working-class. They were ignored; their disenfranchisement is permanently tied to their lack of citizenship. They have no voice, no representation.

Fires disproportionately kill vulnerable people, and Grenfell is no different

We need more than just fire safety; we need fire justice, and a culture which takes stock of the fact that it is the poor and the disadvantaged who die in natural disasters.

The Age of Corbyn 3: Burnt Alive

Grenfell Tower: a high-rise of death that seems to be alive and watching us. A photo-essay.

Where are the missing? How the tabloids underplayed deaths at Grenfell for their own gain

The British press claim they don't want to speculate on numbers until they have an official body count. That’s laudable. But very responsible reporting has become widespread overnight where it never was before.

The religion of property is to blame for the deaths of those at Grenfell

Politicians have been playing Monopoly with people's lives, and Grenfell is the tragic result. 

The Age of Corbyn 2: Inferno

The meaning of Grenfell was immediately understood. Grenfell condemns neoliberal government, which denies it has a name, and forces confrontation with the brutal inequality that is its context.

One law for the poor at Grenfell Tower

In austerity Britain, can justice and accountability be served for the victims of the Grenfell fire? Or are our laws already too much shaped to the needs of the business class?

Theresa May has prioritised the rights of absentee landlords over the Grenfell victims

Objections to the requisitioning of empty properties have nothing to do with fears of state coercion. Instead, it's about protecting the interests of the rich at all costs.

At Grenfell, a lack of accountability was deliberate – and residents were treated with contempt

Why should people have to put up with so little control over their living conditions? Why should they have to put up with organisations more interested in profit than in housing them safely?

Fire in neo-liberal London

The burnt-out shell of Grenfell Tower is a visible reminder that public responsibilities should never be watered down.

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