only search openDemocracy.net

Russia’s new babushkas fill in the welfare gaps

Expectations of babushki taking care of their grandchildren, shaped by the Soviet history of family and economic policies, are hard to implement in a radically different post-socialist context.

See also:

The business of surrogacy in Russia

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Get oDR emails

A weekly roundup of political and social developments in the post-Soviet space.

More from oDR:


“Honour killings” in Russia’s North Caucasus

When women in the North Caucasus are murdered by their families for “immoral behaviour”, justice is rarely done.  

Five years of Russia’s Foreign Agent law

Russia’s Foreign Agent law has made the existence of many NGOs practically impossible. But solidarity is rising among organisations that are working against these restrictions. RU

“This trial turned out to be unique and dystopian in the Orwellian sense”

This week, Russia’s anti-extremism legislation took another four casualties.

The burning land of Lenin-Aul

In a remote corner of Dagestan, a vicious land dispute has erupted between Avars and Chechens. RU

Alexey Navalny and the moral pillars of democracy

Will the restoration of democratic institutions in Russia usher in a liberal paradise? The answer could very well be “no”.

Dissent in Russia: a festival of disobedience?

What kind of freedom do the latest wave of protesters want? Has a new kind of Russian emerged since the collapse of the USSR? The conclusion of our interview with one of Russia’s leading sociologists, Lev Gudkov. RU

A new Chernobyl at your doorstep?

Three decades after the Chernobyl nuclear accident in Ukraine, Belarus is building its first nuclear power station. Concerns about the project’s safety aren’t deterring the authorities.

What is the meaning of journalism in Ukraine today?

13631576_10210200367591722_204667795520323865_n.jpgUkraine’s journalists are often told we need to react in kind to information warfare. But let’s not forget what we can do to de-intensify this conflict.

 

Аполітичне дорослішання в зоні воєнних дій

Війна, пропаганда та брак порозуміння: підлітки в українських прифронтових містечках ростуть в умовах неймовірного стресу. English

In Russia, sociology isn’t just about figures

Is solidarity possible in Russia? How has the relationship between Russia’s government and its citizens panned out in the last few years? An interview with one of Russia’s leading sociologists, Lev Gudkov. RU

Stop GOK: how residents of Chelyabinsk are resisting plans for a new copper plant

Plans for a new copper mining and enrichment plant outside the Urals town of Chelyabinsk are pitting Russian citizens against regional oligarchs. RU

Four years in prison for utopia

Russia’s fight against "extremism" is a convenient pretext for restricting freedom of expression — and journalist Alexander Sokolov is paying the human cost. RU

Eastern Ukraine: “We need new ways of organising”

Amid military conflict and industrial collapse in eastern Ukraine, activists are feeling their way towards new models of worker organisation. 

This week’s challenges for Russian civil society: deportations, harassment, beatings

Attacks on rights activists, harassment of Alexei Navalny's campaign and the slow-motion terror of deportation to Uzbekistan. 

Четыре года тюрьмы за утопию

Журналист Александр Соколов может быть осужден за активистскую деятельность, которую он прекратил несколько лет назад. English

Growing up apolitical in Ukraine’s war zone

War, propaganda and misunderstanding — teenagers in Ukraine’s frontline towns are growing up under incredible stress. Українська

Donbas: “We’re used to the shelling”

The situation in Ukraine's Donbas is tense as ever. While politicians play at diplomacy, civilians spend their lives under artillery bombardment, walking along blown-up roads and burying family members killed by tripwires. RU

Just passing by the Kremlin

How a Russian tourist went to look at the Kremlin — and ended up behind bars. RU

New US sanctions bill on Russia threatens to further erode Minsk agreement

The diplomatic spat over new US Russia sanctions risks eroding a common US-EU position on Ukraine conflict.

“The Putinist majority could fast become anti-Putinist”

An interview with left activist and historian Ilya Budraitskis, on dissent, politics left and right, and the “patriotic majority” in Russia today.

For Russia’s students, the price of protest can be high

Students have featured prominently in Russia’s latest wave of anti-corruption protest, and now they're facing repression as a result. 

Attacks on Russian journalists must stop

A series of assaults on Russian journalists this week accompany a continuing campaign against anti-corruption activists.

An ideal conflict on the Dniester

Twenty five years after the end of the war, a resolution to the frozen conflict over Transnistria seems no closer. This situation suits plenty of people at the top just fine. RU

Why Moscow will never get a museum of migration

Russian museums tend to avoid the subject of migration at all costs. For curators, it seems the people and history embodied in migration processes are invisible. RU

No home, no work, no family: the difficulties of rehabilitation for Russia’s ex-prisoners

Confiscation of property, slave labour, deceit, despair. What else do Russian ex-cons face when they leave prison?

Why are Russians indifferent to the Syrian conflict?

Russia’s on-the-ground involvement in the Syrian conflict is increasing, but there’s still little in the way of interest from the Russian public. 

Little Russia, big dreams

The “Donetsk People’s Republic” has declared itself part of another union — Malorossiya. Is it a serious project, or just a pointed gesture? 

In Uzbekistan, the World Bank is masking labour abuses

Uzbekistan has often used forced labour to bring in the cotton harvest. A new report shows that the World Bank’s continuing investment may only prolong the practice.

 


“Riot Days” brings back Pussy Riot songs

Pussy Riot’s Maria Alyokhina on theatre, prison and the power of examples.

Chechnya: dead Europeans are only sometimes news

Twenty-seven Europeans were executed en masse in a single night earlier this year. The lack of international reaction to this reveals not only what’s wrong with humanity, but even more acutely — the media.

 

Inside Ingushetia’s anti-extremism centre: torture, extortion, murder

Russia’s anti-extremism centres are notorious for their brutal torture. Here are the stories of its victims in Ingushetia, where for the first time, some of the organisation’s operatives face trial for their crimes.

Armenia and Azerbaijan’s collision course over Nagorno-Karabakh

Sound principles for conflict resolution over Nagorno-Karabakh exist. But mistrust, a gulf between mediators and the parties involved, as well as Baku and Yerevan's appetite for military gains render the current formula impossible. 

Russian authorities take aim at supporters of opposition politician Alexei Navalny

Interference with the Russian opposition's nationwide campaign is reaching new heights.

“They made this man an invalid. Can you imagine how they crippled my soul?”

Torture ruins lives. Here, we present monologues of five women whose husbands and sons were beaten, pressured and crippled by members of the Russian police force. 

Strangers in the village

Despite Russia’s economic woes, labour migrants from Central Asia continue to arrive. And now they seek a better life not only in big cities, but in deserted Russian villages. RU

Syndicate content