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Europa z second handu: Ukraińcy w Polsce

Ukraińców pracujących w Polsce jest już ponad milion. Ich liczba ciągle rośnie mimo wzrostu ksenofobicznych nastrojów. English, Русский

Terms and conditions apply: Georgia and Ukraine’s visa-free victory

The EU’s extension of visa-free regimes eastwards is more about managing migration flows than European values. Deutsch

Second-hand Europe: Ukrainian immigrants in Poland

There are already over a million Ukrainians working in Poland. Despite a rise in xenophobic attitudes, their number could grow. Русский, Polski

Is Georgia still safe for Azerbaijani dissidents?

Georgia has long been an oasis for dissidents from neighbouring Azerbaijan. But with Baku investing in its western neighbour at record levels, are they still safe?

How Azerbaijan is losing its brains

Educated young people in Azerbaijan see few prospects for work at home  and even fewer if they’re critically-minded. Русский

Long live the Azerbaijani diaspora!

Baku is going to great lengths to mobilise, or even create, an international Azerbaijani diaspora. To what end? Русский

We have nothing else to sell but our teeth

Fleeing repression under the Kadyrov regime, many Chechens are seeking asylum in Poland. The reception by the Polish authorities is far from welcoming. 

Dreams of Europe: refugees and xenophobia in Russia and Ukraine

Europe’s refugee crisis has affected Russia and Ukraine in different ways — solidifying local hatreds, local hierarchies and varying views of European identity. Русский

The women of Brest Station

These Chechen women are falling foul of changing attitudes on the EU’s eastern border, but they have made the railway station in Brest an unlikely piece of home in Belarus. Русский

Ukraine’s ministry of internal hatred

14680713_1341810105859774_6392757783503302157_n (1).jpgUkrainian citizens displaced following the outbreak of conflict in the Donbas are still fighting for their rights — and public officials are using them as scapegoats. Русский

 


Ossetians in Georgia, with their backs to the mountains

In the shadow of conflicts past and present, Ossetians and Georgians have found ways to coexist. Twenty-five years after the collapse of the USSR, how do they fit into the post-Soviet story?

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