Human rights: mass or elite movement?

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights seeks to improve the life conditions, dignity, and well-being of society's most oppressed, vulnerable, and impoverished groups. The international human rights machinery, however, is embedded in high-flying international organizations, such as the United Nations, and in extremely elite professions, such as international diplomacy and law.

Are human rights principles, policies, and approaches coming down to earth? Can local civil society groups overcome the international human rights machinery's cultural, educational, and social barriers? Can they develop strong and explicit human rights constituencies among ordinary people? The articles in this section address these questions issues head-on, beginning with a description of new "Human Rights Perception Polls" in Mexico, India, Morocco, and Colombia.


The struggle for a truly grassroots human rights movement

Pilot testing Using cutting-edge human rights perception polls, the authors explore links between social class and domestic human rights movements in Mexico, Colombia, Morocco, and India. Social elites, they find, are better connected to human rights representatives than the masses. Translations: Español, Français, العربية, 中国语文, हिंदी, Português, Türkçe

Latest responses:

Linking mass emigration, violence and human rights violations in Mexico

Benjamin Waddell

Mexico’s crisis is a rare opportunity for domestic rights groups

Karina Ansolabehere

Peña-Nieto, take note: Mexicans are embracing human rights

Jorge G. Castañeda

International “naming and shaming” of Mexico won’t suffice without massive domestic mobilization

Alejandro Anaya

Three decades of socialization later, Mexicans view “human rights” as their own

Natalia Saltalamacchia

Is the emerging middle class our best hope for global rights activism?

Doutje Lettinga

Palestinian rights activists must prove relevance

Rifat Odeh Kassis

Replacing the peace process with civil rights

Noam Sheizaf

Moroccans are protesting, but conditions aren’t improving

Amina Bouyach

Israeli rights groups don’t have to be popular to be effective

Jessica Montell

Strategic choices facing Israeli rights group during the current war

Dahlia Scheindlin

Can “the people” truly set the agenda?

Ursula Levelt

Internationalizing the human rights movement: creating a North-South bridge?

Iain Levine

East African rights activists are badly out of touch

Florence Ochago

Activists and elites: connecting the dots

Steve Crawshaw

Doing Orwell proud: “human rights” slogans in Mexico

Barbara Frey

Elites still matter when protecting human rights

Felipe Cordero

In defense of 'professional' human rights organizations

Fateh Azzam

Neither elites nor masses: protecting human rights in the real world

Janice Gallagher

Reforming and transforming: A multi-directional investigation of human rights

Karina Ansolabehere

Human rights for whom? A closer look at elitism and women's rights in Africa

Moiyattu Banya

Speaking with an elite accent: human rights and the "masses"

Ezequiel González-Ocantos

Human rights: a mirror for all

Eilat Maoz

Belief in common humanity is the first principle

Nidal Al-Azza

Fighting abuses in existing powers

Clifford Bob

Civil society, human rights and Jewish-Israeli communitarians

Liora Sion

Where is the humanism in Israel?

Lori Allen

Human Rights, "Human Beings" and Israel

Ian S. Lustick

The 'no grassroots' critique of human rights: fair or misleading?

Geoff Dancy

Making universalism resonate locally

Jessica Montell

Making human rights matter to the marginalised

Nicola Browne and Dessie Donnelly

International NGOs supporting grassroots movements: who talks and who listens?

Kate Nash

The antithesis of elitism

Shaurimoyo

A global human rights movement?

Peter Brett

All articles in date order

Linking mass emigration, violence and human rights violations in Mexico

Mass emigration in Mexico deprives communities of human and social capital, facilitating narco-led violence and human rights abuses. A contribution to the debate, Human Rights: Mass or Elite Movement? Español

Mexico’s crisis is a rare opportunity for domestic rights groups

Mexico is in crisis, but local rights groups can use this as an opportunity to boost public engagement and support. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate, Human Rights: Mass or Elite Movement?  Español

Peña-Nieto, take note: Mexicans are embracing human rights

Mexican society does not disregard human rights, and Peña Nieto cannot afford to either. A contribution from Mexico to the debate Human Rights: Mass or Elite Movement? Español
 

International “naming and shaming” of Mexico won’t suffice without massive domestic mobilization

International actors have done an enormous amount of “naming and shaming” over the disappearance and probable murder of 43 Mexican students. It is up to Mexicans, however, to make the changes that count. From the openGlobalRights debate, Human rights: mass or elite movement?  Español

Three decades of socialization later, Mexicans view “human rights” as their own

Newly released surveys show that Mexicans accept human rights ideas as their own. What impact will this have on the country’s human rights crisis? A contribution from Mexico to Human Rights: Mass or Elite Movement? Español

The next Gaza war: is dismantling Jewish settlements more dangerous for Palestinians than Israelis?

Before the Israeli government removed Jewish settlers from the Gaza Strip, settlers warned that their eviction would only make things worse for Israelis inside the Green Line. Nearly a decade later, it looks like they were right.From the openGlobalRights debate, Human rights: mass or elite movement? العربيةעברית

Is the emerging middle class our best hope for global rights activism?

A global poll into perceptions of human rights confirms there is hope for international human rights organizations to build alliances within Southern civil societies to demand protection of human rights. More efforts should be put into involving local groups in global advocacy. From the openGlobalRights debate, Human rights: mass or elite movementEspañolFrançaisالعربية

Palestinian rights activists must prove relevance

Palestinian rights groups must realize that they have limited international influence, but that Palestinians have high expectations. The war in Gaza has challenged them further, and they must step up their efforts. From the openGlobalRights debate, Human rights: mass or elite movementالعربية