only search openDemocracy.net

Can we trust the BBC?

As a public service broadcaster, the concept of trust is paramount. From its news coverage to funding and political questions behind the scenes, can we trust the corporation?

The media–technology–military industrial complex

In a world of so-called fake news and post-truth politics, the influence of largely invisible qualities of concentrated power over media, public and policy agendas, warrants renewed and urgent scrutiny.

If dissensus is the new normal in Britain, we need a new media

An inquiry into the future of public service broadcasting in Britain launched its report days after the Brexit vote. It holds important clues to how we deal with the current breakdown of consensus.

Lord Puttnam: the BBC must confront a "total" loss of trust

The film producer and chair of a major inquiry into the future of public service broadcasting calls on the BBC to help rebuild trust in Brexit Britain.

The BBC and British branding

The corporation’s claims to the public and to neutrality are crucial for the British state and its power across the globe. 

Decoding the BBC White Paper

Apocalyptic rumours followed by a row-back and relief. It's an age-old strategy, but what's the reality behind the government's BBC proposals?

The General Strike to Corbyn: 90 years of BBC establishment bias

On the anniversary of the 1926 General Strike, looking back to the early BBC helps us understand the latest bias scandal, over coverage of Labour's anti-semitism scandal vs Tory election fraud.

On the new British 'popular'

The fight over the BBC is also a struggle over what it means, in the UK, to be ‘popular’. In other words, who are the people?

Tomorrow’s BBC will be fitted to your personality

The BBC is doing cutting-edge research into Visual Perceptive Media, virtual reality and facial coding technologies. But do we want our shows to be tailored to our age, gender, and tastes? And what happens to all that data?

‘Red-tape’ is at the heart of the BBC’s democratic remit

The so-called ‘sharing economy’ is composed largely of opaque shoddily managed companies. Rather than mimicking these models, the BBC must make the case for improving and developing its much-lamented bureaucracy.   

How is Islam represented on the BBC?

While the Corporation’s news coverage tends to reinforce stereotypes, its cultural programming calls these into question.

The British are dangerously ill-informed about the EU referendum

Research suggests that the UK media are failing to adequately inform the British public, ahead of the country's referendum on EU membership. The BBC, in particular, has a duty to step up its game. 

To the BBC: don’t give airtime to the Taliban’s threats

Afghanis inside and outside the country have been angered by the BBC's interview with a Taliban spokesman directly after a suicide attack, in which he announced a new target.

The BBC, Savile and investigations

In a week when the BBC has been hit by yet more scandal as a result of suppressing an investigation into the notorious paedophile Jimmy Savile, we ask: does the BBC need an investigations unit?

Making the news or breaking it: a unique problem for the BBC

The argument over whether the BBC 'orchestrated' the resignation of a Labour shadow minister for political effect is more than it seems.

The BBC's Northern Irish Troubles

From its inception as an unabashedly ‘unionist’ organization, the BBC in Belfast has had a problematic history. Has the corporation of today managed to shake off the dilemmas of the past?

The BBC needs a new Scottish channel

Why isn't there a digital Scottish channel for the 5 million Scots who speak English? Such a move could start to heal the wounds between Scotland and the BBC.

The good, the bad, and Corbynmania: how to defend the BBC

Not all defences of the BBC are good. What can the Corbyn insurgency teach us about how to make a progressive case for the corporation?

Imagining the BBC as new

Despite Armando Iannucci’s skilful defence of the BBC, defending the Corporation as it stands falls into the trap of using the language of austerity.

Panorama, the Corbyn surge and the political establishment

This week’s Panorama documentary on Jeremy Corbyn has been criticised for shoddy reporting and overt political bias in favour of the political establishment. This is not an isolated incident. 

“Whose side are you on?” Public broadcasters and counter-terrorism

When it comes to state surveillance and “terrorism”, there is a long history of political pressure, control and manipulation over the arm of the media entrusted with the explicit mission of serving the public. 

Why is the BBC presenting RUSI as objective analysts of the Middle East?

The ‘Royal United Services Institute’ has close links with the British state and its military establishment. The BBC should not present its analysis as apolitical ‘fact’. 

Propaganda or professionalism on Pacific Quay?

How were political issues covered by BBC Reporting Scotland and STV News in the four months before UK General Election 2015? 

The BBC Trust: a work in progress

A chorus of critics is calling for the abolition of the BBC Trust. Yes, it may be flawed but this body could yet be reformed to fulfil its public service function.

Scrutinising the Scrutineers: part 3

UK media coverage of EU issues is frequently superficial and plagued by basic errors. The BBC, and others, must work to change this.

Scrutinising the Scrutineers: part 2

Infuriated by the BBC’s lack of coverage of its work, The European Scrutiny committee is at the centre of a discussion about the ‘limits’ of the corporation's independence. 

Scrutinising the Scrutineers: part 1

The European Scrutiny Committee has locked horns with the BBC, repeatedly accusing it of a pro-EU bias. Is the corporation’s editorial independence under threat? 

The BBC and the arms trade: a silent scandal

In its recent appointments to the BBC Trust, the government has deeply associated our public broadcaster with the arms trade. Why aren’t we talking about this?

Beyond our shores: Europhobia and the BBC

The BBC has been attacked from all sides about its European coverage. How it responds will have consequences far beyond the newsroom.  

Less velvet glove, more iron fist

The new Chair of the BBC Trust Rona Fairhead has given her first public speech which was widely reviewed. Now the dust has settled – but what did Rona say, and more importantly, what did she really mean? 

Syndicate content