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Inside the BBC

We talk with employees past and present about life and work inside the corporation.

The BBC has lost touch: here's how it could re-connect

A filmmaker advises BBC news staff on how to better engage with the harsh realities of life for many in Britain.

Under construction: the BBC’s relationship with freelancers

In order to innovate in the new media environment the BBC must build a new system for working with freelancers.  

The BBC, Savile and investigations

In a week when the BBC has been hit by yet more scandal as a result of suppressing an investigation into the notorious paedophile Jimmy Savile, we ask: does the BBC need an investigations unit?

Sue Lloyd-Roberts a unique phenomenon at the BBC

Investigative journalist Sue Lloyd Roberts who died this week, fought for the oppressed and downtrodden. The BBC should keep her mission alive with a unit dedicated to human rights worldwide.

Does the World Service have a future?

The editor of BBC World Service News until earlier this year argues that the funding of the World Service through the licence fee strengthens the corporation's hand in negotiations about a new charter. 

“We cannot allow chaff to impact strategic direction”: an interview with the BBC’s Andrew Scadding

The Head of Corporate Affairs at the BBC talks about pressures and ambitions at the organisation ahead of next year’s Charter Renewal. 

My Beeb: a precarious memoir

Working at the BBC is no guarantee of a career in journalism. An ex-employee recounts their journey from the news desk to claiming unemployment benefits. 

Positive discrimination may have to be introduced at the BBC

Is the BBC really making good on its promise to "reflect the diversity of its audiences in both its programmes and workforce"? An ex-employee calls for radical change. 

Welcome to the echo chamber

From Reuters to the BBC the future of journalism is being presented as cyber-utopia. For many in the industry, though, the reality is of poor quality content fuelled by dodgy ethics. 

"Nobody has a God given right to be heard": an interview with John Humphrys

John Humphrys, presenter of BBC Radio 4's Today programme, gives his view on the changing world of journalism and the challenges facing young people who wish to enter the industry. 

"There's a proper market for proper journalism": an interview with Robert Peston

Robert Peston gives his views on what it's like for entry level broadcast journalists in the BBC - and elsewhere - today. This is one of a series of features on, and by, young journalists. 

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