only search openDemocracy.net

Great Charter Convention

Power where? Nations, regions, cities

Here we examine questions about the territorial distribution of power in the UK, including the question of what form (if any) ‘devolution’ should take in other nations of the UK following the post-referendum settlement in Scotland, and calls for more devolution to cities and regions.

A constitutional convention A written constitution? Rethinking representation Building it: campaigns and movements
Rights and liberties today A new charter of the forest Power where? Nations, regions, cities History


The EU referendum: why we need a Deliberation Day

The UK is going to vote on staying or leaving the EU. A special bank holiday – Deliberation Day – can help make the decision an informed one.

Returning native

Returning to Wales, David Marquand finds that devolution has created a political community interestingly open to new possibilities.

Devolution in Hampshire: A report on Assembly South

Is Assembly South a model for giving the public more voice in devolution?

Devolution versus democracy? A report on Assembly North

The people of south Yorkshire want devolution - but they also want the process to be much more democratic.

Behold the 'Manchester Withington question'

'English Votes for English Laws' is supposed to answer the 'West Lothian question' – yet the government's English devolution policy is recreating the same question in a new form.

‘English Votes’ is sheer political vandalism and fundamentally changes Britain

The break up of Britain has moved one step closer.

Britain’s Ptolemaic constitution

English votes for English laws is another botched attempt to fiddle with a broken system.

Executive ‘horse-trading’ united Scotland: the Scottish constitutional convention and its relevance today

The constitutional convention changed Scottish politics through hard earned consensus building. The Scottish experience could be a driving force in mending broken British democracy.

Northern Powerhouse: switch on the power

To complete the Northern Powerhouse we need to invest in creativity.

Devolution for Yorkshire?

Can we turn 'devolution' from above into 'self-determination' from below? What would this look like in Yorkshire?

The Labour candidates on an English Labour Party, a constitutional convention and a written constitution

Labour leadership candidates responses on an English Labour Party and the Constitution.

Wales and the changing Union

Further devolution to Wales is necessary but must be considered as part of a shift to a federal UK. A constitutional convention is the way to make this happen.

Fracturing democracy? State, fracking and local power in Lancashire

Fracking may have been rejected in Lancashire, but the battle reveals that power is being stripped from the people of Britain.

A power sharing deal between Westminster and the home nations is needed.

The German model shows that another union is possible.

Radical regionalism and democratic politics in England

The election result underscores the need for a profound rethink by the left in England: this should focus on regionalism and radical democracy. 

Re-imagining England

Originally delivered as a public lecture at the University of Winchester on Thursday 9th October, 2014, John Denham reflects on the future of England and "Englishness."

'Devo Manc': 'Northern Powerhouse' or 'Northern Poorhouse'?

Centralisation has certainly failed, but the promise of devolution to Greater Manchester is being massively hyped.

All for English devolution - but what about English democracy?

All three main UK parties are keen to pursue English devolution. But their proposals are elite-driven and do not take democracy seriously enough.

Against ad hocery: we need a more democratic approach to UK devolution

We need a process for determining devolution that is more considered, democratic and which tackles devolution in the context of the wider failings of the UK state.

Democracy exists by the act of doing it: a meeting with Podemos in Manchester

A meeting with Podemos in Manchester provides an opportunity to reflect on the meaning of democracy and the need to challenge the undemocratic politics of 'DevoManc'.

Devolution in the North of England: time to bring the people into the debate?

The referendum in Scotland is creating impetus for a redistribution of power within England. But who will determine the shape of this - Westminster, local elites or local citizens?

The tartan tsunami and how It will change Scotland and the UK for good

As Britain faces a general election, it's clearer than ever that Scotland is a completely different country.

The making of the Greater Manchester mayor - what next?

The creation of a new elected mayor for Greater Manchester takes further forward a decade of constructive innovation - but there are crucial issues of inclusion and public engagement which must be got right.

#DevoNorth and #DevoManc

A new campaign wants to put the 'DevoManc' proposal to a referendum of the people of Greater Manchester. It is one sign of a growing desire to put the people, rather than politicians, in control.

The UK's constitutional future: a view from the US

A leading US constitutional lawyer and political scientist asks if the UK is moving towards federalism, making the need for a written constitution imperative. If so, how to decide on a written constitution?

A mayor for all seasons?

The case for elected mayors has not been scrutinised sufficiently. The imposition of an elected mayor on Greater Manchester in particular risks undermining a delicate local political balance and is an act of elitism that might well backfire.

Four options for configuring the UK

Unitary state, devolution, federalism or confederation? Andrew Blick discusses four options for configuring the UK.

Sturgeon comes to London

At a speech in London, Nicola Sturgeon pitched her party as responsible partners to a Labour government.

Re-imagining democracy - peoples' assemblies

This spring, inaugural Assemblies for Democracy in London, Manchester and Glasgow will identify the major issues with our clearly inadequate democracy and then start work thinking on how we could solve them.

When judges disagree - the ECHR and British sovereignty

Although Conservatives cite Lord Judge in support of repealing the human rights act, his actual position on the matter undermines their case for repeal.

In defence of the Human Rights Act - laws must change with society

The law must adapt to remain relevant. The changing interpretation of human rights is entirely in line with our best legal traditions.

Magna Carta can still challenge the orthodoxy and help resolve today’s democratic difficulties

What influence does Magna Carta, signed 800 years ago at Runnymede by King John, continue to have over UK democracy and governance? A lot.

Why wait for government permission for a convention?

Lee Waters sets out the Institute of Welsh Affairs' plans to hold a ‘crowd sourced’ Constitutional Convention.

Forget parties, we need a system of 'issue based politics'

We should elect ministers directly, give them a substantial slice of votes, and combine their votes with those of other ministers, other elected representatives, and also direct votes from the public. What might this look like in practice?

Syndicate content