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Why legal aid matters and what you can do about it

Cuts to legal aid are causing widespread injustice and likely costing the taxpayer more. The government are reviewing the cuts. We have a final chance to tell them we care.

Windrush and Legal Aid: how free legal representation could have avoided a national scandal

Many migration decisions are wrong - but since legal aid for such cases was scrapped by the LASPO Act 2012, few migrants have the money to challenge them. Meanwhile, an ongoing review drags on.

Do we have a right to justice?

As new research reveals the devastating impact of legal aid cuts, Labour is considering not only reversing some of those cuts but enshirining in law our right to justice.

The rule of law fights back

The recent Supreme Court decision on employment tribunal fees is a victory for our constitution. This is the rule of law, in action.

A poor track record and a worrying manifesto on civil rights

After the surpising 2017 general election, opposition parties have a golden opportunity to stand up for the rights of UK citizens.

The quiet revolution that could transform lives

Most people can't afford a transcript from their own trial even when it's the only thing that could prove their innocence. We need to move beyond the status quo.

 

It's about time our judiciary started to reflect the people it serves

A senior judiciary that so clearly fails to reflect the ethnic, gender and social composition of the nation seriously undermines justice in England and Wales.

Draconian cuts to legal aid for prisoners found to be unlawful by Court of Appeal

A rare thing: some good news for prisoners and legal aid. 

Do fewer lawyers and judges of colour mean more prisoners of colour?

When professionals within the criminal justice system cannot relate to the ordinary people that come before them, justice cannot be done.

How safe is the legal aid 'safety net'?

When the government decimated legal aid, they created a ‘safety net’ for human rights related cases. Has the scheme really helped to protect the rights of those most in need?

Hope for access to justice?

Against a backdrop of cuts and closures, the Greater Manchester Law Centre opened its doors last year - an inspiration for grass-roots community organising. This is their story.

UK government wants to move justice online - but can computers perform essentially human functions?

Online courts may replace justice, empathy and judgment with compromise and efficiency.

When no good deed goes unpunished

Families in the UK that open their doors to child relatives fleeing the camps of Calais are being penalised by stringent rules on legal aid.

Asylum seekers are left destitute and homeless due to a lack of legal aid

One of the least reported devastations caused by government legal aid cuts has been on asylum seekers. Vulnerable people seeking refuge in the UK are left destitute and homeless.

Justice - open to all, like the Ritz hotel

The government has committed to reviewing cuts to legal aid and the fight for justice and government accountability has just begun.

Can technology save access to justice?

In the tsunami of austerity cuts, technology provides one of the few possible islands from which we can rebuild acceptable levels of assistance and, indeed, resistance.

Legal aid cuts are a major human rights issue

Amnesty found that the recent sharp cuts to civil legal aid have hurt not only those people already in the most pain, but the integrity of the justice system itself. 

Hungry, homeless and in need of a legal aid lawyer

Government plans to introduce a discriminatory test for legal aid were thwarted earlier this year. This is why that decision was right.

Crowdfunding and access to justice

Should members of the public make up the access to justice deficit?

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