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VIDEO: The man who debunked austerity

Thomas Herndon shot to fame in 2013 when he found errors in a widely cited academic paper used to justify austerity policies in Europe and North America. Here he speaks to openDemocracy about austerity, the financial crisis and the future of economic policy.

From Bah Humbug to Oh Jeremy Corbyn – the best political books of 2017

Never mind miserabilism - this Christmas Mark Perryman discovers plenty of books full of reasons to be cheerful.

Spycops inquiry - concerns over new Chair, as police continue to delay

The inquiry into police spies deceiving activists into relationships has a new Chair – but will justice be served, or will police delays compound the harm they’ve already done?

Privatised services are failing thousands of vulnerable addicts and alcoholics

It’s entirely unacceptable that people suffering from addiction are forced to turn to the inadequate private sector for treatment, writes shadow Health Secretary Jon Ashworth in the wake of a damning report by the regulator.

If we’re serious about social mobility, we need demographic quotas for our universities

Top universities aren’t doing enough to break down the social segregation that puts off poorer students, leaving it easy to portray these establishments as ‘bastions of privilege’.

Scrapping anti-Terror laws – naivety or opportunity?

As the government awaits the first report of the Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation, Theresa May has reason to be worried.

Brexit isn't the only thing parliament needs to demand a vote on right now - the NHS is too

In January, Jeremy Hunt will attempt to sneak through secondary regulations, without parliamentary debate, what some have called the ‘biggest change to the NHS since its creation. Do enough MPs care enough to stop him?

“I’m really just a slave” – how hotel chains exploit agency loopholes and dehumanise workers

Alenka, like so many others, hopes for a better life but is caught up in a catch-22, valued only for the absence of a smudge on a bathroom mirror.

As Brexit dominates, its causes are being forgotten

The perennial and tragic irony is that the very conditions which led to Brexit are being eclipsed by the government's total preoccupation with it. 

Could the end of Britain’s tabloid-driven migration policy be in sight?

Right now, there’s a political window for a more sensible, positive approach to migration that could boost regional economies, strengthen productivity and help achieve trade deals, a new report finds.

33 Theses for an Economics Reformation

On 12 December 2017, Rethinking Economics and the New Weather Institute published '33 Theses for an Economics Reformation' to mark 500 years since the Catholic Reformation. The Theses, which were en...

Turkophilia and the common life: a pledge, a bond, and a very special appeal

Exactly one hundred years to the day – the story of a British Scots-Irish family who learnt to love Turkey, of two rosaries and of a silver Koran. Bianet Turkish. Cumhuriyet.

Why you should care about Aberdeen university's war on democracy

Aberdeen university annulling its rector election is part of an ongoing attack on education democracy.

Film review: The Spider’s Web - Britain’s Second Empire

The definitive account of how Britain's Empire was transformed into a new financial empire of offshore tax havens and secrecy jurisdictions.

The WTO matters more than ever - here's what you need to know about its summit

Is a neoliberal dream being reborn in Latin America? It’s not got off to the best of starts…

Free trade is bad for women. A WTO declaration won’t change that.

Gendered exploitation is at the heart of the free trade agenda -- a few tweaks to the edges won’t make it feminist.

Mythbusting Britain First - 5 things you need to know

Since Donald Trump retweeted three videos from Britain First last week, the far right organisation has received a lot of attention - but some has been highly speculative. Here we sort the myths from the facts.

Another lonely Skype Christmas, thanks to the ‘minimum income requirement’?

Meghan Markle might not have to worry about the ‘minimum income requirement’, but if you marry a Brit of more modest means than Prince Harry, you might face years of separation from your partner and family.

Pressure mounts on British universities to ‘come clean’ on fossil fuel investments

Paradise Papers revelations have added to long-standing concerns about universities’ fossil fuel investments - and students are now upping the ante.

Whilst the right-wing press invents ghosts on the left, plutocracy is tightening its grip

When politics becomes the whims and mad schemes of a small minority that only listen to themselves, it needs to be called out - not normalised - by a non-partisan media.

Brexit, Ireland, and the revenge of history

Either Theresa May’s government falls, or Britain crashes out of the EU with no trade deal. May’s squalid deal with Northern Irish hardliners allows no alternative.

VIDEO: Interview with George Kerevan

The economist and former MP speaks to openDemocracy about neoliberalism and the media.

In defence of Damien Green

How could a defender of human rights on so many occasions turn so quickly into being an inquisitor?

Lexit: on the rails

Could the EU be an obstacle to nationalising the UK rail network? We asked Christian Wolmar, the UK’s leading railway expert and transport historian.

Nigel Farage, Aaron Banks, and the ugly face of metals mining

The two leading Brexiteers gave keynote speeches at an exclusive Mines & Money conference in London last week – as communities whose livelihoods, health and environments are being destroyed, protested outside.

Who are Veterans for Britain?

You can’t understand Brexit without understanding Veterans for Britain.

One year on from the by-election that changed progressive politics

A year ago, Zac Goldsmith was kicked out of his Richmond seat, proving that a Progressive Alliance could work. One year and a general election later, was that it for plural campaigning?

‘GP at hand’: handy for whom?

New technology should be managed for the benefit of all – not used to allow profit-hungry firms to cherry-pick healthy patients.

We survive - but AIDS is not over - a BANG BUS special

AIDS is not over – not for the millions still being infected both at home and globally, nor for those of us still living with the consequences of infection, survival and harsh early treatments. We need both actions and memorial.

Brexit Britain is displaying its old, dangerous delusions about Ireland

The British establishment’s understanding of Ireland has long been delusional and dysfunctional – now combined with Brexit and Theresa May's dependence on the DUP to cling to power, it’s creating a powder keg.

The UK’s Industrial Strategy needs to be more than repackaged pet projects

In the light of Brexit, can a new coalition of social class and territorial interests mobilise to deliver a meaningful industrial strategy? 

Meet the think tank shaping the future of Britain's food and countryside

Why you should be worried that Legatum is lobbying the government about farm subsidies and a UK-US free trade deal.

Connor Sparrowhawk: How one boy’s death in NHS care inspired a movement for justice

  • The story of a UK campaign for truth and accountability. And respect for the lives of people who have learning disabilities. Review by Clare Sambrook. Extract by Sara Ryan.

Do you know where the Brexit dark money came from? Tell us anonymously

Someone out there knows something about the DUP's mystery £435,000 Brexit spending spree. It's vital for democracy that we all find out.

How Legatum has written the hymn sheet for a Dirty Brexit

The open secret that Brexit is more about financial and environmental deregulation than immigration is confirmed by a Legatum Institute briefing for City slickers.

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