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The rule of law fights back

The recent Supreme Court decision on employment tribunal fees is a victory for our constitution. This is the rule of law, in action.

Vince Cable, human rights, militias and dodgy deals in the Niger Delta

What does Britain’s role in the export of gunships to a Nigerian warlord tell us about the new Lib Dem leader – and about the British establishment’s attitude to its post-colonial, post-Brexit place in the world?

Austerity in one country: The case of Britain

A decade of failed economic and social policies has left the UK economy in a perilous state. 

London is cloaking environmental racism in respectability – but Zambian villagers are fighting back

Zambian villagers await a landmark judgement that could help hold British companies to account for their actions abroad.

An epochal election: welcome to the era of platform politics

In an era characterised by reversibility, platform capitalism is producing newly discernible forms of aggregation and dispersal. Some things are certain: we need a socialism of the twenty-first century, and meaningful cultures of debate.

Shooting for the moon: Why we need a new mission for a zero carbon future

We need to start thinking big to drive innovation towards a greener, more inclusive economy.  

No Bregrets: does Brexit hold hope for progressives after all?

Most UK progressives voted Remain, but the referendum result has brought about the welcome collapse of the Tory majority. Could Brexit under Labour provide a forward-looking social democracy?

Growing up on the border: on Brexit’s Irish problem

People voted to take back control of the UK's borders... with little thought for what that would mean for the only actual land border.

Brexit, Dunkirk and a Britain where the past shapes the future

Nostalgia for ‘Dunkirk’ exposes the threadbare nature of our national stories, as do both Tory and Labour responses to Brexit.

Milli Vanilli fake diversity at the BBC

“When it comes to BAME, Ofcom must set a minimum standard that the BBC have to meet behind the camera.”

No, Channel 4: Islam is not responsible for the Islamic State

“I am a longstanding admirer of Holland. However, the arguments he makes in his film are intellectually dishonest.”

Food, the UK and Brexit: an even messier reprise of Corn Laws politics?

We see Liam Fox warming up a US-UK trade deal, while Michael Gove assures consumers that animal welfare and food quality standards are safe in his hands. This doesn’t add up.

Brexit and the global south: Why it’s time to end free trade imperialism

After Brexit, Britain must prioritise trade justice for the poorest countries of the world.

Shocking new evidence could overturn Northern Ireland ruling that became an international blueprint for torture

I “felt like I was drowning or suffocating until I fell on the floor unconscious” - new testimony from survivors of torture in Nothern Ireland goes to the heart of British colonial myth-making.

John Berger and the Booker Prize

Clarity is more important than money.

Words of fire

The language of resistance is resourceful, creative and deep. After Grenfell, the words of those affected ring out clearly and truly – showing up the shallow contempt of those by whom they are governed.

The UK government thinks I am an extremist – and you might be one too

The UK government has turned to the policing of ideas in their efforts to pre-empt and thwart terrorism. Such a strategy makes anyone who rejects the status quo a potential suspect.

Aesthetic labour, beauty politics and neoliberalism: An interview with Rosalind Gill

Ian Sinclair speaks to Professor Rosalind Gill about the relationship between beauty politics, aesthetic labour and neoliberalism, the role of social media and the impact all this has on women.

Why the Conservative-DUP deal spells bad news for the environment

Beneath the surface, the new confidence and supply deal poses a number of threats to environmental justice.

Leadsom campaign chair denies involvement in dark-money funded poll which boosted her campaign

The MP who ran Andrea Leadsom’s leadership bid tells openDemocracy that he wasn’t involved in commissioning a key opinion poll which boosted her campaign and was funded by the secretive Constitutional Research Council.

Rashman: Police watchdog to investigate lethal restraint of young black man in Hackney

  • Police claim officer “intervened” to “prevent the man from harming himself”. But video shows sustained restraint. (warning: distressing)

Key poll which boosted Leadsom’s leadership bid funded by DUP’s dark-money donors

An important poll which added momentum to Andrea Leadsom’s campaign to become prime minister was funded by the secretive Constitutional Research Council.

Breaking the poverty cycle through parenting

Is it parenting or the financial situation of a family that can break the poverty trap? Parental confidence is the link between the two.

Shareholder capitalism: A system in crisis

"The modern joint stock company is a British invention… but the rules need to change as the world changes. Boards should take account of the interests not just of shareholders but employees, supplie...

The price of love that nearly half of us cannot pay

If you fall in love with an EU citizen, your rights to a family life are at risk from Brexit. But if you fall in love with someone from elsewhere in the world, you've already lost them. It's time to push back.

Residents challenge council plans to demolish their homes

Central Hill housing estate in South London is threatened with demolition. Residents are challenging the “regeneration”. Photos by Wasi Daniju, words by Lotte Lewis.

Making the inevitable impossible – winning at the fossil fuel frontlines

From Lancashire to the Italian coast – communities are disrupting the fossil fuel conglomerates threatening their homes, environment, and livelihoods.

Spying, surveillance and sabotage - what will it take to bring an end to political policing?

Is it possible to hold undercover policing to account? Not without redistributing wealth and power within society.

Why the ICC examination into torture and other abuses by UK soldiers in Iraq must continue

The Office of the Prosecutor is under pressure to conclude the examination. It must remain open. The Prosecutor should be taking it to the next logical step – a full-blown investigation. 

Grenfell tower and the people without capital

Contempt for Grenfell residents is representative of the way the city of London treats its global working-class. They were ignored; their disenfranchisement is permanently tied to their lack of citizenship. They have no voice, no representation.

All the fun of the (arms) fair this Sunday

A fun day out for all the family has a dark side, as arms dealers shake hands with oppressive military regimes right alongside the picnic blankets.

The most foolish NHS privatisation yet?

If private staffing agency fees are damaging the NHS so much, why on earth does the government keep trying to privatise the in-house agency set up to help the NHS avoid the problem?

Ditching the dogma: When does a focus on productivity become counterproductive?

"Productivity" is the mantra in current economic discussions. But it's too often undefined - and is it even relevant in an economy where care, personal services and creative sectors are growing in significance?

Release details of DUP Brexit ‘dark money’, MPs tells Northern Ireland Secretary

Why is James Brokenshire colluding with the DUP to cover up Northern Irish donations between 2014 and 2017?

Human rights protection at home and abroad: lessons to be learned from the Colombian peace process

Human rights abuses in Colombia can serve as a stark reminder of what the UK has to lose. 

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