Iceland's unfinished revolution? An interview with Hordur Torfason

The award-winning human rights activist credited with starting Iceland's 'pots and pans revolution', discusses with Phil England the prospects for 'unfreezing' the draft new constitution.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world
Flickr/anieto2k. Some rights reserved.

Iceland's unfinished revolution? An interview with Hordur Torfason

The award-winning human rights activist credited with starting Iceland's 'pots and pans revolution', discusses with Phil England the prospects for 'unfreezing' the draft new constitution.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world
Flickr/anieto2k. Some rights reserved.

Why the Labour Party should reclaim individualism

Labour must redefine individualism in a way that differs from neoliberalism if it is to win over both middle- and working-class voters.

History repeating: zero-hours contracts and the strike of 1889

As low-paid workers become increasingly unprotected, the working conditions of the 20th century could become a mere historical blip.

Melvyn Bragg versus Anthony Barnett on the Magna Carta continued

A lively exchange over Magna Carta, Bragg's series of programmes on it, and Barnett's criticisms of those programmes.

Researching health companies: a web search guide

How to uncover the facts about the companies involved in NHS privatisation - a joint OurNHS/Corporate Watch guide, and the first in a series of bite-sized OurNHS guides to NHS campaigning. 

The challenge facing the Liberal Democrats

The Lib Dems must embark on an ambitious course if they are to survive in the new, fractured political landscape.

The gendered impact of Universal Credit

Women and poor families will fare badly under the new welfare system due to measures aimed at those in part-time or low-paid work.

The truth behind Osborne's devolution "revolution"

Despite the “radical devolution” promised by the chancellor, the Cities and Local Government Devolution Bill will leave Westminster firmly in control of the things that matter.

Toddlers, rats, asbestos. G4S, asylum seekers’ landlord

Why would the UK government let its commercial contractor get away with housing vulnerable asylum seekers in dangerous slums?

A dance of destitution - psychology's clash over coercion

Job centres are becoming gladiatorial arenas where unemployed people and professionals slug it out, whilst the ethical battle rages.

Torturers must be brought to justice

If elements of the British state were involved they must be held accountable. David Cameron has only shirked his responsibilities.

Is David Cameron serious about curbing child marriage?

The Prime Minister has stated his determination to combat child marriage globally, but he must use Britain's leverage more effectively in Bangladesh.

The great TTIP debate that never was

The postponement of last week’s debate denied MEPs the chance to lay out their red lines on the controversial US-EU trade deal.

The IMF and Labour's economic record

Labour's macroeconomic management during 1997-2010 is a matter for celebration rather than apology.

The BBC must not allow the press to dictate its agenda

Perceived pressure from the press and politicians is impacting on the BBC’s news coverage. In Britain's cynical media environment, those working inside the corporation must fight for its core values.  

800 years since the Magna Carta: Remembering the British struggle for ethnic minority rights

As we approach the 800th aniversary of Magna Carta, let us recall other important anniversaries which mark the struggle for black and minority ethnic rights in the UK.

Latin lessons: what Latin America can teach us about faith in society

Latin America provides ideas on how to translate social need into an available programme of action.

The Tories can't decide whether they want more or less 'human rights'

If Michael Gove listens to Daniel Hannan’s honeyed polemic on Human Rights he really will get into a muddle.

Six reasons why the UK parliament should have youth quotas

Young people are disadvantaged economically yet politically marginalised and demonised. Are youth quotas in parliament part of the answer?

Why is the BBC presenting RUSI as objective analysts of the Middle East?

The ‘Royal United Services Institute’ has close links with the British state and its military establishment. The BBC should not present its analysis as apolitical ‘fact’. 

Osborne's undemocratic devolution

Osborne claims he is offering cities and regions self-determination - but it has to be done his way. Or it doesn't happen at all.

The most disproportionate election in our history. 2020 must not be a repeat.

The electoral system is broken beyond all dispute. Here's why, and here's how to fix it.

MEPs' mounting TTIP opposition scandalously silenced ahead of knife-edge US vote

Faced with a possible shock rejection of TTIP by MEPs, Brussels simply cancelled the vote this week – and now Washington moves swiftly to speed up the publicly unpopular trade deal.

From King John to Baron Bragg: celebrating Magna Carta

As the Queen is prepared to annoint the humiliation of King John with a witticism there is a gathering anger against the way Britain is governed.

What is a 'progressive'?

It's a much (over)used word, but what do people actually mean by it?

Mapping fossil fuel power

The complex web of interests maintaining the fossil fuel industry is being creatively exposed.

Saatchi’s bill could harm thousands

Killing the Saatchi bill was one of the few good things the Lib Dems achieved. Now, with no coalition restraints, Saatchi is again trying to force his bill through parliament.

A new coup is unfolding in the East End

The smear campaign against Rabina Khan that the media won't discuss.

Abolition of the Political and Constitutional Reform Committee is a loss to British democracy

The government's decision to abolish the Political and Constitutional Reform Commitee is a major blow, depriving British democracy of a major support for informed discussion of options for constitutional change.

The long, rocky ride of crisis and austerity

In this next post of the series, we explore how capitalism’s crises are always borne by the poor and the weak, and how it is justified.

The essence, not the ephemera: on the loss of the Political and Constitutional Reform Select Committee

The government's closure of the Political and Constitutional Reform Select Committee is a shabby decision. The case clarifies the need for a constitutional convention to support full and open public discussion of the UK's political system.

Inside the world of debt collection

Debt collection, like much of finance, relies largely on obfuscation and public ignorance.

Human rights, why should I care? More real life stories

The state took three lives. A hospital discharged a suicidal young woman. The police unlawfully tapped a man’s phone. Three stories from RightsInfo:

The EU has a big vote on TTIP this Wednesday - make your voice heard now

Which MEPs will stand up for national sovereignty and England's NHS? Wednesday's key vote is a crucial test, especially on the hated idea of 'investor courts'.

The alternative Magna Carta festival

This Saturday, in London, will be a gathering to celebrate the genuine meaning of Magna Carta - come!

Downfall

Is Labour dead and how can radical hope be rebuilt?

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