Children suffer racist abuse and ‘degrading treatment’ by guards high on drugs at G4S Rainsbrook prison

G4S appoints “new leadership” at Rainsbrook: the man in charge when Gareth Myatt, 15, was restrained to death, the man who told an inquest he hadn’t read the restraint manual.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Children suffer racist abuse and ‘degrading treatment’ by guards high on drugs at G4S Rainsbrook prison

G4S appoints “new leadership” at Rainsbrook: the man in charge when Gareth Myatt, 15, was restrained to death, the man who told an inquest he hadn’t read the restraint manual.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

The left needs to confront its illusions about the EU

How can we voice opposition to the EU without sounding like Nigel Farage?

The PR campaign behind the Saatchi Bill needs exposing

How Lord Saatchi’s Medical Innovation Bill team undermined the government consultation into their own bill, and how the government let them get away with it.

From electricity suppliers to doctors, why do many reject the modern imperative to 'shop around'?

A new report by the Competition and Markets Authority highlights how poorer people are failed by energy markets. Jonathan Tomlinson finds the same for health - and for understandable reasons. 

Lose the licence fee, abolish the Trust

A new House of Commons report sets out the issues for the forthcoming review of the BBC Charter. It calls for the abolition of the BBC Trust and a long-term replacement for the licence fee. 

Four options for configuring the UK

Unitary state, devolution, federalism or confederation? Andrew Blick discusses four options for configuring the UK.

A theatre of narrative

The performance of stories in various fringe venues has gathered enough momentum to present the possibility of a Theatre of Narrative where the art of storytelling is as vital as other performing arts.

The Saatchi Bill is not about 'innovation' but 'improvisation'

We already have a sound structure for innovation. What this Bill will deliver is medical improvisation with virtually non-existent patient safeguards.

Why did intelligence agencies spy on Greenpeace?

Because they are building a vast system of social control.

Wolf Hall: history and her story

The television adaptation of Wolf Hall is somewhat dull but its appearance offers an opportunity to reflect anew on the unaccountable success of the original book.

Why is the government putting health watchdogs on the leash of ‘promoting economic growth’?

Lord Tunnicliffe asked in Parliament on November 20, 2014: “are these new clauses a licence for regulators to approve regulations that kill people to save money?”

Language, populism and democracy

The ability and desire to rouse 'emotion' in the demos should not be left to right wing populists - language is critical to how people view and understand the world.

Beyond our shores: Europhobia and the BBC

The BBC has been attacked from all sides about its European coverage. How it responds will have consequences far beyond the newsroom.  

What’s happening to my local GP? Carrots, sticks, and the long game of NHS privatisation

Behind yet more spin of 'more power to GPs', the scary truth is of a profession being steadily dismantled to make way for the unfettered free market. 

When Irish Travellers die in British prisons

Inside and outside prison, Travellers have particular vulnerabilities.

The winning preamble for a written constitution in the UK

The winning introductory preamble for a written constitution from the competition hosted by the Political and Constitutional Reform Committee.

The Saatchi Bill is internally inconsistent and must be scrutinised in the Commons

The Bill claims to both protect patients and also prevent doctors fearing litigation - clearly, it cannot achieve both. One must come at the expense of the other, and it's patients who are going to lose out.

It's no surprise Rifkind and Straw don't get it. Westminster's swimming in corporate influence

Jack Straw and Malcolm Rifkind can't see what they have done wrong because they swim in a sea of corporate influence.

Development resistance threatens election upset in Devon

In one seat in the South West, the bookies list the main challenger is an independent. What's going on?

Communities of resistance: resistance is not futile

Understanding how neo-liberalism can be challenged by common and reciprocal action.

Want more sex crime? Send more kids to jail

Sending children to prison may make them more likely to commit sexual offences in adulthood, Britain’s first independent review of sex behind bars has found.

From here to democracy, open letter to Ed Miliband

Labour is promising British voters a muddled, demoralising way forward for democratic reform despite its leader knowing better, here is the solution.

Help set journalism free

Peter Oborne's HBSC/Telegraph revelations expose a fundamental threat to press freedoms. Contribute to openDemocracy today, so we can keep bringing you the stories others won't.

Grasping the nettle: how to clean up party funding

There are simple solutions to the UK's party funding mess.

Less velvet glove, more iron fist

The new Chair of the BBC Trust Rona Fairhead has given her first public speech which was widely reviewed. Now the dust has settled – but what did Rona say, and more importantly, what did she really mean? 

Community Rights: where’s the evidence?

The Communities and Local Government Select Committee has reported back on its inquiry into Community Rights.  The government has responded – using dodgy data to reward bad performance. What’s the story?

Fallout from the Oborne files

More evidence has emerged of corporate influence at the Telegraph.

Do HSBC's claims to Parliamentary committees still stack up?

Past statements from HSBC executives, including in evidence to parliamentary committees, make for interesting reading in the light of recent revelations.

From Magna Carta to magna market

The upcoming Global Law Summit does seem to have plenty to do with the rule of law, but perhaps not in the way its corporate organisers think.

The price to pay for journalism?

This week’s incendiary claims by Peter Oborne on openDemocracy pose serious challenges not only for the Telegraph but for all news publishers and their readers.

The wider significance of Oborne’s resignation

Oborne's resigation raises multiple issues concerning journalistic integrity at a time when public trust in institutions is virtually non-existent. Will any of the big parties pledge serious media reform in their manifestos?

Could Labour be more like Syriza?

The big question is whether Labour can rise to the challenge, accept the enormity of the changes needed and put forward a compelling vision for the future. The alternative may well be "Pasokification".

On the accuracy of our Oborne story

The Telegraph accuse us of publishing "inaccuracy and innuendo", but they haven't pointed to any specific errors in Peter Oborne's piece.

The Work Programme, people and economy part 4 - 'failure' and 'success'

The final part of a four part series on the Work Programme, examining what the programme means by 'success' and 'failure'.

Righting a wrong: how to restore decency to the British Indian Ocean Territory

Past injustices inflicted on the last outpost of empire need to be acknowledged – and redressed.

The HSBC scandal: if HMRC is underfunded tax cheats will continue to win

Lots of information doing the rounds has been known about for years. The real problem is that HMRC have had their budget slashed, and they have adopted an extremely soft stance toward tax cheats.

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