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No right to despair

As we enter into five years of Conservative rule, those of us who are relatively privileged need to be reminded of a vital principle: we have no right to despair. We won't pay the highest price.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

No right to despair

As we enter into five years of Conservative rule, those of us who are relatively privileged need to be reminded of a vital principle: we have no right to despair. We won't pay the highest price.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Lord Hall’s modest proposal for the BBC

While Charter Review has been marked by a clamour over cuts to programmes and services, less attention has been paid to a BBC proposal which could have equally far-reaching implications.  

How 'unelectable' is Jeremy Corbyn?

There are arguments to be had over whether Corbyn’s policies would work – but the available evidence suggests his agenda is more palatable to the electorate than many would like to admit. 

Six problems with Sarah Ditum’s article about Iraq and the left

Sarah Ditum misrepresents the left and the case against the Iraq war.

Scottish rent controls: we’ve walked 500 miles, but we need to walk 500 more

Nicola Sturgeon's announcement that the Scottish government will introduce rent controls is welcome, but the detail will make all the difference.

The BBC charter renewal, seen through a Nordic lens

The ex-Director General of the Danish Broadcasting Corporation compares the British and Nordic debates about the future of public service media. 

No right to despair

As we enter into five years of Conservative rule, those of us who are relatively privileged need to be reminded of a vital principle: we have no right to despair. We won't pay the highest price.

UK ‘Fairtrade’ Universities miss the point: Of both fair trade alternatives and the real function of universities

Fairtrade Universities focus too much on consumption and not enough on what universities are for: ideas.

Labour values, the NHS and me

One victim of the 'labour purge' explains why he wanted to vote in Labour's leadership election - and why he'd supported the National Health Action Party, despite being a lifelong Labour voter.

Yes, climate activists need to win over the right. But we need to win over the centre left again too.

The centre left once showed concern about climate change. Not any more.

What would a Labour-Green electoral pact actually look like?

The rise of Jeremy Corbyn has led to speculation about a Green/Labour electoral pact. But what could each party actually offer the other?

Bristol says no to Branson takeover of local NHS

Today in Bristol hundreds of people protested outside (and inside!) the offices of the local Clinical Commissioning Group, who are set to decide whether to hand children's NHS services over to Virgin. Exclusive footage of today's lively protest.

If you don’t share this immediately the entire world will explode

Is there too much hyperbole in digital activism? Should campaigners really follow the rules of modern marketing in online movements?

Gordon Brown has some nerve criticising Jeremy Corbyn on foreign policy

Gordon Brown should think carefully about his own relationship with violent extremists before he talks about Corbyn.

The BBC, the press and online news

Scaling back the BBC will damage the UK’s sole source of impartial, quality and trusted news, whose independence is valued by users in the UK and around the world.

What the Labour leadership candidates say on macroeconomic policy

What do the Labour leadership candidates propose to do about the economy?

GCHQ and me

Investigative journalist Duncan Campbell recounts his experiences unmasking British eavesdroppers. 

Dusting off the Sangatte playbook: a humane, practical course of action in Calais

Increased security at Calais might prevent migrants risking life and limb to get to the UK, but it will not deal with the migrants currently living rough in the Pas de Calais, nor the wider problem of refugee and migrant flows into the EU.

The BBC and its poetry

Defending itself from cuts is not enough. The BBC must forge a new identity based on collaboration, pluralism and the creativity of a global audience. 

Let us face the future: Labour, Jeremy Corbyn and the power of the past

Labour needs to embrace tomorrow, not pine for yesterday.

Reconciling VJ Day

Reflections from a Victory in Japan day commemoration in the West Midlands.

Why Labour probably won't split if Corbyn wins

Despite the rumours, the Labour party is unlikely to split in the event of a Corbyn victory.

The great Labour purge is underway

The UK Labour party is cancelling the memberships of significant numbers of people who joined in order to vote in its leadership election - and even some who joined before.

Devolution for Yorkshire?

Can we turn 'devolution' from above into 'self-determination' from below? What would this look like in Yorkshire?

What Labour needs to learn from the divestment and anti-fracking movements

Movements to divest from fossil fuels and oppose fracking have cut a path which Labour should follow.

Labour and the comfort zone

If Corbyn wins, he will have to be willing to accept some radical changes to the way that politics works.

Satisfactory? The UK immigration lock-up that Samaritans dare not visit

  • • Another man dies at The Verne, an isolated detention centre in Dorset
  • • The Samaritans said Verne was too dangerous to visit
  • • Chief inspector of prisons concludes Verne is “satisfactory”

Jeremy Corbyn’s first 100 days

What alarms the opponents of the Labour Party's probable next leader? That he is not thirty years behind the times - but ten years ahead.

Britain’s creative kickstarter: the BBC

Want to know the value of the BBC to Britain’s £76.4 billion creative economy? Have a look at the unique impact of its Manchester investment.

Democracy needs informed debate: how do we get it?

Democracy requires informed debate. Gavin Barker sets out a proposal for how Assemblies for Democracy and other citizen groups can help to improve citizens' access to high quality information.

Why is Corbyn doing better on social media?

Corbyn's natural, unpolished and conversational comfort puts him well ahead of the other candidates in terms of engaging social media, if not the electorate at large.

When did inconvenience kill compassion? Thoughts on Calais

If we replace “migrant” with “desperate and terrified person” do we see something different? A nurse and psychotherapist writes.

So many reasons why turning landlords into immigration officials is a bad idea

A lawyer argues that the UK is moving from immigration control to migrant exploitation.

35 economists back Corbyn's policies as sensible

Far from being 'mad', plenty of economists welcome Corbyn's proposals as opening up fruitful new areas for public discussion on the economy.

Equal rights for all: the limits of Magna Carta and the 1965 Race Relations Act

The commemoration of Magna Carta should not be a complacent celebration, but an opportunity to explore what more we need to do as a nation to secure equal rights for Black and minority ethnic people.

Magna Carta: a beggarly thing, a mess of pottage

If Magna Carta is the cornerstone of liberty, why did the Levellers, democratic radicals of the 17th century, reject it as 'containing many marks of intolerable bondage'?

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