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The roots of Russia’s atomised mourning

Post-Soviet people have spent two decades mourning a society that never existed. Русский

Make Moldova great again

Moldovans are diverse in culture, language and political preference, but united by a lack of faith in their leaders. How does that bode for a second round of presidential elections?

Moldova’s election: against all of the above

Moldova’s presidential race isn’t over yet. Neither are the country’s geopolitical divides or its long-standing struggle with oligarchs. Can they ever be?

Wołyń: towards memory dialogue between Poland and Ukraine

A new film opens up the horrors of the Second World War, but will it enable reconciliation?

Welcome to the post-post-Soviet era

To this day, Lenin lies in state on Red Square. There’s still space in the mausoleum for more modern heroes  and their ideas. Русский

Tbilisi’s Panorama project is urban boosterism at its worst

A massive new construction project overlooking Georgia’s capital reveals the true extent of an oligarch’s grip on politics — and Tbilisi’s struggle to become a city for all its people.

The fate of Georgian dreams

Amid widespread apathy and corruption, Georgia’s democracy faces all too familiar obstacles.

Sergey Kirienko, from nuclear to political power

After ten years as head of Rosatom, Sergey Kirienko is now deputy head of Russia’s Presidential Administration. What will he bring to the job? Русский

Making do with the crew

In the aftermath of parliamentary elections, can Georgia build a more stable political culture?

Our man in Moldova

In courting the country’s most loathed oligarch, the EU and US will only lose the sympathy of ordinary Moldovans.

Big trouble in little Georgia

For years, Georgia’s politics has been organised around the “search for a saviour”. But now this search has quietly ended, what is left?

On 25 years of postmodernity in the South Caucasus

A quarter century since the collapse of Soviet rule in Armenia, Georgia, and Azerbaijan, where is the region now and what can come next? Русский

Georgia’s politics of piety

Georgia’s church is independent of the state. How long before the state can free itself from the church?

Release Ilgar Mammadov

As Azerbaijan votes on constitutional amendments today, let’s not forget the country’s political prisoners.

Russia’s security services are trying to reform their way out of the shadows

10838229_1015976098430355_7234058766256563378_o.jpgSweeping reforms to Russia’s power ministries show that the FSB has the country’s security monopoly in its sights.

 

Russia’s reluctant elections

The results may be predictable, but Russia’s parliamentary elections hint at the next stage of regime mobilisation.

Goodbye, Bastrykin?

Moscow has a new motto: work a little harder, steal a little less. A big name may have just fallen foul of it.

 

Why Russia needs the Levada Center

Independent sociological research in Russia is under serious threat. The country’s leading non-governmental polling agency has been labelled a “foreign agent” and may have to close. Русский

A stalemate in Belarus

Two new opposition candidates prepare to take their seats after rigged parliamentary elections in Belarus. As ever, the real losers are ordinary citizens.

Kremlinology: an intervention

Protests and strikes across Russia show that the country’s “silent majority” is becoming louder. But are pundits even listening?

The green shoots of Russian grassroots activism (part 2)

Our story on Russia’s grassroots activism continues. From Moscow’s parks to federal highways, ordinary citizens learn the power of protest  and of solidarity.

The green shoots of Russian grassroots activism

What do two Moscow parks and a truck drivers’ trade union have in common? They have been the focus of protests that have shown that the Russian public may be losing its traditional passivity.

Goodbye Karimov

We don't know whether Uzbekistan's leader is alive or dead. But the system he created will live on.

Who do I call if I want to speak to "pro-Russian forces" in Georgia?

In Georgia, whether you're in opposition or in power, you can always call your opponent an agent of the Kremlin.

Putin’s incredible shrinking circle

12946.jpgIvanov’s departure leaves few voices able to speak truth to Putin.

 

Neoliberalism, mining and Armenia's politics of plunder

The resurgence of fighting with Azerbaijan could hinder progressive mobilisation in Armenia, but recent environmental initiatives reveal the appetite for resistance to the economy of extraction.

Ukraine’s rulers are backing themselves into a corner

As Europe's sanctions resolve against Russia evaporates, Ukraine's domestic political contest is heating up — Kyiv is turning its sights on the constitutional court. 

Depoliticising protests in Armenia

Years of social and environmental protests in Armenia have proven one thing — our demands must be political in nature. Русский

The “Moscow Consensus”: Constructing autocracy in post-Soviet Eurasia

Across the former Soviet Union, a new type of authoritarianism has become the default — with commerce, parliaments, military, media and civil society used to consolidate elite economic and political power. 

Is neoliberalism applicable to Russia? A response to Ilya Matveev

Attempts to call the Putin regime “neoliberal” get one fundamental thing wrong: capitalism doesn’t exist in Russia. Русский

Counting down to Russia’s 2016 Duma Elections

As Russia gears up for a parliamentary elections this autumn, how can the country's embattled opposition and civil society offer a real contest to the Kremlin's "imitation democracy"?

Georgia: the exiles’ election

Twenty five years after the separatist wars that shook Georgia, 265,000 displaced people still struggle to make ends meet — and their voices heard. 

Atomic energy and political power in Russia

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In Russia, the space for environmental activism and advocacy is changing under increasing state pressure. An interview with one of Russia’s leading ecological organisations about the prospects for anti-nuclear activism today. Русский

Russia’s regions: federalism and its discontents

Creating the appearance of stability is the Russian political elite’s primary goal. Yet colonial-like rule over the country’s regions, combined with a lack of civic activity, harms the Kremlin’s legitimacy on the ground. Русский

“Karabakh rules Armenia”

Shots have been fired over Nagorno-Karabakh, and leaders in Baku and Yerevan demand national unity. But behind the patriotic hysteria is a cry for social justice.

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