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Ossetians in Georgia, with their backs to the mountains

In the shadow of conflicts past and present, Ossetians and Georgians have found ways to coexist. Twenty-five years after the collapse of the USSR, how do they fit into the post-Soviet story?

Georgia: the exiles’ election

Twenty five years after the separatist wars that shook Georgia, 265,000 displaced people still struggle to make ends meet — and their voices heard. 

South Ossetia's creeping border

no to collaborators.jpgRenewed tensions along the de-facto border between Georgia and South Ossetia have raised concerns in Tbilisiand laid bare Georgia's political rivalries.


North Ossetia is rethinking its role as Russia's ‘outpost’ in the Caucasus

From ‘outpost’ to ‘outpostism’ and then to ‘outposter’, North Ossetians are feeling increasingly alienated from the Russian centre.

South Ossetia’s unwanted independence

South Ossetians may yearn for union with Russia, but the complicated political realities of the South Caucasus make this an unlikely prospect.

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