only search openDemocracy.net

Central Asia and more

Phantom foreign investors for an open new Uzbekistan

A high-profile urban development project in Tashkent is designed to showcase the country for western capital. Our investigation suggests principal investors are from much closer to home. 

Dispossession and urban development in the new Tashkent

A new $1.3 billion development in Uzbekistan’s capital is meant to rebrand this Central Asian state as open for business. But the costs of this project are turning out to be all too human. RU

The Central Asian valley where borders dissolve in grassroots cooperation

Sandwiched between three Central Asian states, people living on all sides of the Ferghana Valley are overcoming securitisation – through everyday cooperation.

The democratic future of Uzbekistan doesn’t depend on the politicians, but whether workers can mobilise

Uzbekistan’s transition to a market economy will require further worker suppression. But signs of worker mobilisation in the Karimov era can give us hope. RU

How to return one billion dollars stolen from the people of Uzbekistan

The saga of Gulnara Karimova’s ill-gotten and ill-fated assets – frozen in a number of mostly European jurisdictions – may soon come to an end.

Soft power under Mirziyoyev: Change and continuity in Uzbekistan’s foreign policy

Much has been made of the new Uzbek leader's openness, but Shavkat Mirziyoyev's rule is rooted in the path set by his predecessor. 

Modernising authoritarianism in Uzbekistan

Uzbekistan’s so-called “spring” is more about upgrading this Central Asian state than providing political freedoms.

A new era in US-Uzbekistan relations poses old challenges for the international community

My country is at a crossroads. If it does not reform its governance system to better protect against corruption, it will become mired in crony capitalism. 

How Russia and Uzbekistan cooperate on the kidnap trail to Central Asia

People leave Uzbekistan seeking safety and work in Russia. But what they find is prosecution and abduction.

If Paul Day builds a monument to late Uzbek dictator Islam Karimov, the blood of his victims will taint the artist’s work forever

Open letter from Uzbek human rights activists to British sculptor Paul Day, commissioned to commemorate former President. The sculpture is to go outside the Uzbek embassy in Moscow. 

Out of political prison in Uzbekistan, and still an optimist

Erkin Musaev spent 11 years in prison on fabricated charges. As signs of cautious reform emerge in Uzbekistan, this former political prisoner is keen to see real change happen. 

Uzbekistan’s new leader fails his first test

One year after the death of Islam Karimov, the continued use of forced labour in Uzbekistan’s cotton fields shows how slow the pace of change really is.

 

In Uzbekistan, the World Bank is masking labour abuses

Uzbekistan has often used forced labour to bring in the cotton harvest. A new report shows that the World Bank’s continuing investment may only prolong the practice.

 


Uzbekistan after Karimov: goodbye to the family business

As Uzbekistan's elite recovers from the shock of Islam Karimov's death, the scrabble for the spoils is only just beginning. 

What would an open Uzbekistan look like?

Nate_schenkkan_tumblr_inline__500_0_0.jpgAs Uzbekistan prepares for transition from the Karimov era, what room is there for positive, if pragmatic, thinking?

 


Goodbye Karimov

We don't know whether Uzbekistan's leader is alive or dead. But the system he created will live on.

“Two million soms and we’ll let you go”

If you push hard enough you can get justice — even in Uzbekistan.

 

Book review: Hamid Ismailov ‘The Underground’

Cover_Ismailov_TheUnderground.pngIn The Underground, like his mixed-race hero, Hamid Ismailov is looking, above and below ground, for the answer to the question: what is 'Russianness'?

 

When Russia sneezes, Central Asia catches a cold

Simon_opt022 crop 65x80.jpgRussia’s financial crisis has produced a contagious effect in Central Asia, where cheap oil is exacerbating the poor economic outlook.

 

Regime preservation in Central Asia

Summit pic - Photopress Kremlin.ru_.jpegFor elites in Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan, regime preservation is priority number one. Even if that means cozying up to Putin.

 

Detaining the president’s daughter

Karimova under house arrest Dore Ryan.jpgA year on from her disappearance from public life, what does the treatment of Gulnara Karimova reveal about Uzbekistan’s rights crisis?

The kidnap trail to Central Asia

kidnapped activist crop.jpgCentral Asian security services have been abducting their countries’ citizens from Russia to stand trial on trumped-up charges. And the Russian police have been helping them.

The split widens in the ruling family of Uzbekistan

Karimova under house arrest Dore Ryan.jpgHaving been accused of misappropriating hundreds of millions of dollars, Gulnara Karimova is now under house arrest in Tashkent; one more indication of the schism that is splitting the ruling family.

Is Central Asia afraid of ISIS?

The self-proclaimed ‘Islamic State’ has been seizing more and more territory in the Middle East, and now has its eyes on Central Asia.

 

Syndicate content