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Searching for safe passage

Global compacts, detention centres, and safe passage: can the world change course on migration?

CAMERON THIBOS AND STACY TOPOUZOVA
openDemocracy and University of Oxford

Refugees and migrants have long known that the legal pathways in and out of Europe and North America are essentially closed to all but the global elites. Without the right passport, the right qualifications, and enough money, it is extraordinarily difficult to enter and remain in these areas through regular channels, even when seeking protection from violence or persecution under international law. This is not news. Yet it has taken a European 'crisis of reception' and five years of people dying in the Mediterranean, battling asylum systems, and languishing in detention – along with the accompanying political backlash from both the left and the right – to push migration to the top of the global policy agenda. Read on...

Is good migration governance possible?

Interview: making the global compacts on migrants and refugees worthwhile

SARNATA REYNOLDS
Policy advisor for global displacement and migration, Oxfam

Achieving meaningful global compacts on migration and refugees by end-2018 won’t be easy.

A new agenda for facilitating human mobility after the UN summits

FRANÇOIS CRÉPEAU
UN Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Migrants

Mobility is key to development and prosperity, and with the proper vision we can make broader legal pathways for migration work.

Interview: is rights-based ‘good migration governance’ possible?

MICHELE KLEIN SOLOMON
International Organization for Migration


What children need from the global compacts on refugees and migrants

DANIELA REALE and IGNACIO PACKER
Save the Children and Terre Des Hommes

The initiative must influence the way all children on the move are protected and supported.

Interview: preparing for climate and disaster migration

ATLE SOLBERG
Platform on Disaster Displacement


Gaps in global advocacy for the protection of migrants’ rights

REBECCA BRUBAKER and NINA HALL
UN University and Hertie School of Governance

Migrants have no dedicated advocate within the UN system. Could that be changed?

Interview: why do we think development will stop migration?

CÉCILE RIALLANT
Joint Migration & Development Initiative


Scholars support UN Refugee Global Compact

OPEN LETTER
 

The EU is forcing evermore refugees to live in appalling conditions and without recourse to justice.

Women in migration

Interview: the dangerous invisibility of women migrants

JENNA HOLLIDAY
Independent gender and migration specialist

Women migrate all over the world, yet in comparison to men they barely register in public discussion. This makes them vulnerable.


The struggle of domestic workers in Lebanon

ROULA HAMATI
Research and advocacy advisor, Insan Association

Migrant women working in Lebanese homes have few rights, but they find ways to carve out normalcy for themselves nevertheless.

Interview: empowering women on the move?

CATHERINE TACTAQUIN
Director, National Network for Immigrant and Refugee Rights

Women experience migration differently than men. With the right policies that can be empowering rather than risky.


Leaving home to become a domestic worker

SAROWAT BINTE ISLAM
Research and advocacy advisor, Insan Association

For women migrants from Bangladesh, education and technical skills can be real game changers.

Who’s responsible for violence against migrant women?

JANE FREEDMAN
Université Paris 8

Migrant women are vulnerable to violence at all stages of their journey due to gendered inequalities and relations of domination. Current EU policies restricting migration exacerbate their vulnerability.


Drowning mothers

SINE PLAMBECH
Danish Institute for International Studies

As refugees try to cross the Mediterranean Sea - women are more likely to drown.

We speak but you don’t listen: migrant sex workers at the border

AVA CARADONNA and X:TALK PROJECT
 

The sex workers’ movement demands full decriminalisation of sex work, but this will not help migrants prevented from accessing labour and residence rights.


A domestic worker in Africa

LULU OMAR
Trade union organiser in Tanzania

It takes a lot of legwork to organise some of the world’s most invisible workers.

Precarious migrant motherhood in Lebanon

BINA FERNANDEZ
University of Melbourne

Ethiopian migrant domestic workers who give birth to children in Lebanon are caught in a trap between the struggle to bring up a child with no legal status, and the difficulty of exiting the country.


Claiming rights under kafala

MARIE-JOSÉ L. TAYAH
International Domestic Workers Federation

How to organise when you're legally placed at the complete mercy of their employers.

Detention

Interview: detention as the new migration management?

BEN LEWIS
International Detention Coalition

Under international law I think it's important to note that detention is only ever meant to be an exceptional measure. So it can be an exceptional measure in the criminal context, when people are a harm to others for example, or in an institutional manner, when you're for example a harm to yourself. In the administrative and enforcement context it's meant to be even more exceptionally rare. But what we're seeing is that instead of being an exceptional measure of last resort, detention is now a preferred method of first resort for governments when engaging with undocumented people coming across their border. Read on...

Time for a clear roadmap for states to end child immigration detention

LEEANNE TORPEY and DANIELA REALE
Global Campaign to End Immigration Detention of Children and Save the Children

The UN Global Compacts on Refugees and Migrants need to include an accountable way to end immigration detention for children.

Safe passage

Interview: the cat and mouse game of creating ‘safe passage’

KEVIN APPLEBY
Scalabrini International Migration Network

'Safe passages' has been used to describe a situation where someone migrates in security with a legal status and a definite destination, and with a purpose. That's not always the reality of it, however. Sometimes there are situations where, even if they have legal status, they might be in jeopardy for some reason, if there is conflict or some other sort of event going on. It also doesn’t mean their rights are protected when they arrive in a destination country. So, safe passage means they should be safe on the way but it doesn't mean they are, and it doesn't mean their rights are protected in the workplace when they get to the destination country. Read on...

Safe passage: an integral component of the responsibility to protect

ALEX BELLAMY
University of Queensland

The world accepted the ‘responsibility to protect’ many years ago, but now they must live up to that commitment by ensuring safe passage and protecting displaced persons.


Will “America first” mean refugees last?

BILL FRELICK
Human Rights Watch

Regardless of if you look at United States, Europe, or the Pacific, the global asylum system is quickly falling apart.

Safe migration as an emerging anti-trafficking agenda?

SVERRE MOLLAND
Australian National University

Safe migration allows anti-trafficking groups to re-articulate how a concern with labour exploitation relates to migration, yet it remains unclear how ‘safety’ can be ensured.


Tortured for ransom: extortion on migrant routes

LUCIA HEISTERKAMP
Marburg University

The phenomenon of torture for ransom is increasingly occurring on migrant routes as a new form of human trafficking.

Crowdsourced humanitarianism and the fight for safe passage

PHIL BRACEY
Independent researcher

Social media helped coordinate a volunteer response to the new arrivals on Lesvos when governments failed to step up to the plate, but can such a system be replicated?


Pushing for safe passage in Ireland
 

JENNIFER DEWAN
Nasc Ireland

The families of many Irish citizens and residents are stuck in war zones. Why won’t the state offer them safe passage?

Cameron Thibos

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