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This week’s editor

Tom Rowley is editor of oDR, covering the progressive agenda in Eurasia.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Foreign aid is a waste of money—unless it’s used for transformation

Simplistic stories of saving children trap aid agencies inside a self-defeating logic

With Marielle's killing in Rio, a dream breaks into pieces

The tragic death of Marielle Franco, a black activist against violence in Rio, and a city councilor, fuels fears that the current militarization of security  in Brazil is the prelude to a return to its dictatorial past. Spanish

With marijuana now legal, Los Angeles goes further to make amends for the war on drugs

How one city is repairing the damage caused by marijuana prohibition for the people who’ve been most affected.

The Great Society versus the Poor People’s Campaign

What can we learn from contrasting efforts to combat poverty and injustice in 1960s America?

Three more ways to build solidarity across our differences

For most people divisive rhetoric isn’t new; they’ve been developing ways to counter it for years.

Meet the Glasscos: lesbian foster parents in America’s Bible Belt

In Alabama, religiously-affiliated private adoption agencies can legally discriminate against same-sex couples, but the law may be having the opposite effect.

Horizontalising international NGOs: can it be done?

Alternative structures are available—if we have the courage to adopt them.

Structures are constructed everywhere, including inside ourselves

Radical change requires public participation; it isn’t something a vanguard can sort out for the rest of us.

Things that make for peace

What is required of Christians today in the light of the increasing number of wars, insurgencies, holocausts and genocide, is a deeper understanding of what true peacemaking costs.

Gun violence has dropped dramatically in three US states with very different gun laws

To have an honest, nonpartisan discussion about gun violence, we must look at what happened in New York, California, and Texas.

Priceless moments: how capitalism eats our time

Economic rationality leaves no room for free time unless it produces or consumes commercial wealth.

It’s time to take our charities to the cleaners

Everyone needs a deep clean from time to time. Best to do it before your teeth get infected.

Why positive thinking isn’t neoliberal

By discouraging the use of powerful self-healing and self-development tools we may weaken those who are already disempowered.

#MeToo, dialogue and healing

To give voice to our deepest experiences is to cultivate connection and collective healing.

The courage of difficult women

What happened at Save the Children is a symptom of a wider problem in our society which urgently needs to be addressed. The women who have spoken up are the real heroes, not the men who have had the ‘courage’ to admit their mistakes.

What’s it all about, Oxfam?

We should seize this opportunity to re-examine the future of foreign aid.

Why mental health is the hidden cost of the housing crisis

Our homes are supposed to be safe and welcoming, yet one in five adults in the UK suffer from mental health problems due to housing pressures.

What’s to be done with Oxfam, part 2?

Is it gratuitous to link the scandal engulfing Oxfam with the need to transform NGOs and foreign aid?

Walking the path of love

Small acts of love have the potential to join together to create a more compassionate society.

Five ways to transform our economies

We need a new economics for the 21st century. Here are five potential pillars.

Radical happiness: moments of collective joy

True happiness is produced by cultivating our ties to one another: a review of Lynne Segal’s new book.

Six things urban feminists should never say to rural people

Folks with degrees from Smith and Wellesley talked to me in slower, louder voices once they realized where I was from.

Why is the American left so prejudiced about the South?

Smugness and complacency are no basis for effective action on poverty, inequality and racism throughout the USA.

You don’t have to be embarrassed to be vegan

The more welcoming and accessible veganism becomes, the closer we’ll get to our goal: a world free of cruelty.

Why reconciliation and redemption are central to countering white supremacy

Sammy Rangel, director of Life After Hate, talks about his work with violent extremists.

How to start a revolution - remembering Gene Sharp

Gene Sharp, the American philosopher of non-violent direct action whose extensive writings have inspired generations of activists, died this week aged 90. Tim Gee pays tribute.

“We’re a movement, not just a magazine”

Can the arts stimulate new ways of living in old mining communities like Doncaster?

Why we must respect the rights of all sentient animals

The only way to recognize the moral personhood of animals is to accord them a right not to be property—and that means the abolition of animal exploitation.

After #MeToo: healing from the trauma of sexual assault

Within two weeks, 94 percent of women survivors will experience PTSD. 

Transforming the powers: the continuing relevance of Walter Wink

Any attempt to transform a social system without addressing both its spirituality and its outer forms is doomed to failure.

A 'Minister for Loneliness' is a sticking plaster for the ills of neoliberalism

Is loneliness the price we pay for an ideology that privileges individual freedom and ‘choice’ above the collective and communal; that sees attachment to others as an obstacle to the pursuit of profit?

Is catastrophe the only cure for the weakness of radical politics?

If we want a future worthy of the name we need a different form of revolution.

A renewed Poor People’s Campaign revives King’s dream of challenging class divides

Can a new fusion of movements reignite the search for freedom and equality in America?

Can polarisation be eroded by design?

How can society encourage more nuance and compromise when entrenched opposition is baked into consumerism and politics? Español

Fire and fury: the psychodrama of a very stable genius

Donald Trump is portrayed as a narcissist, but what exactly does that mean?

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