openGlobalRights https://www.opendemocracy.net/taxonomy/term/12849/all cached version 04/07/2018 11:17:35 en The latest on OpenGlobalRights: connecting human rights with development and creating space for women rights defenders https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-connecting-human-rights-with-develo-0 <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Recently on OpenGlobalRights, authors debated the lack of action on connecting human rights and development and why a space for women human rights defenders is so important.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Recently on OpenGlobalRights, Paul Nelson and Ellen Dorsey discussed <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Human-rights-and-development-has-the-connection-sunk-in/?lang=English">the connection between human rights and development</a>, arguing that not enough development actors have directly acted on this issue. Then, Ana María Hernández Cárdenas and Nallely Guadalupe Tello Méndez discussed the need for collective care in the human rights community, explaining how they have created a <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Creating-a-healing-space-for-women-human-rights-defenders/?lang=English">healing space for women human rights defenders</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>We are continuously publishing new content and creating different themes for debate and dialogue, so stay informed by <a href="https://opendemocracy.us15.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=acf31f31349d04466ff82e3fb&amp;id=94909f1bd2">subscribing here</a> for weekly updates. Interested in writing for us? <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/write-for-openglobalrights/">Click here</a> for submission guidelines. </p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/recently-on-openglobalrights-authors-debate-rising-threats-and-c">Recently on OpenGlobalRights: authors debate rising threats and challenges in human rights</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-online-documentation-and-advocati">Last week on OpenGlobal Rights: online documentation and advocating for environmental rights</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-hope-in-human-rights-progress-alo">Last week on OpenGlobal Rights: the hope in human rights progress alongside the inequality of the system</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights The OGR Editorial Team Wed, 16 May 2018 08:00:00 +0000 The OGR Editorial Team 117903 at https://www.opendemocracy.net The latest on OpenGlobalRights: connecting human rights with development and creating space for women rights defenders https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-connecting-human-rights-with-developm <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Recently on OpenGlobalRights, authors debated the lack of action on connecting human rights and development and why a space for women human rights defenders is so important.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Recently on OpenGlobalRights, Paul Nelson and Ellen Dorsey discussed <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Human-rights-and-development-has-the-connection-sunk-in/?lang=English">the connection between human rights and development</a>, arguing that not enough development actors have directly acted on this issue. Then, Ana María Hernández Cárdenas and Nallely Guadalupe Tello Méndez discussed the need for collective care in the human rights community, explaining how they have created a <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Creating-a-healing-space-for-women-human-rights-defenders/?lang=English">healing space for women human rights defenders</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>We are continuously publishing new content and creating different themes for debate and dialogue, so stay informed by <a href="https://opendemocracy.us15.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=acf31f31349d04466ff82e3fb&amp;id=94909f1bd2">subscribing here</a> for weekly updates. Interested in writing for us? <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/write-for-openglobalrights/">Click here</a> for submission guidelines. </p><div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights The OGR Editorial Team Wed, 16 May 2018 08:00:00 +0000 The OGR Editorial Team 117902 at https://www.opendemocracy.net The latest on OpenGlobalRights: dilemmas of international justice and fighting backlash against feminism https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-dilemmas-of-international-justice-and <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Recently on OpenGlobalRights, authors debated whether advances in international justice are prolonging conflicts, how to fight backlash against feminism, and the balance of engaging corporations with human rights.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Recently on OpenGlobalRights, Daniel Krcmaric argued that advances in international justice mean that <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Leaders-exile-and-the-dilemmas-of-international-justice/?lang=English">authoritarian leaders are not seeking exile</a>, which potentially prolongs conflicts. Nadejda Dermendjieva and Gergana Kutseva discussed how to fight the <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Fighting-the-backlash-against-feminism-in-Bulgaria/?lang=English">backlash against women’s rights, feminism, and LBGTQ rights</a> in Bulgaria. Rajshri Sen then described <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Being-flexible-while-staying-true-the-balance-of-engaging-corporations-in-human-rights/?lang=English">strategies for NGOs to engage corporations,</a> which requires human rights organizations to be both flexible and steadfast. Finally, Dhananjayan Sriskandarajah and Mandeep Tiwana set out <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Reclaiming-civic-space-global-challenges-local-responses/">the three main drivers of closing civic space</a> and three critical issues affecting local responses.</p> <p>We are continuously publishing new content and creating different themes for debate and dialogue, so stay informed by <a href="https://opendemocracy.us15.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=acf31f31349d04466ff82e3fb&amp;id=94909f1bd2">subscribing here</a> for weekly updates. Interested in writing for us? <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/write-for-openglobalrights/">Click here</a> for submission guidelines.</p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-using-sdgs-to-curb-authoritarian-powe">The latest on OpenGlobalRights: using the SDGs to curb authoritarian power and framing gun violence as a human rights issue</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-holding-home-states-accountable-and-r">The latest on OpenGlobalRights: holding home states accountable and re-thinking transitional justice</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-gene-editing-activist-balance-and-eng">The latest on OpenGlobalRights: gene editing, the activist balance, and engaging corporations</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights The OGR Editorial Team Wed, 09 May 2018 08:00:00 +0000 The OGR Editorial Team 117746 at https://www.opendemocracy.net The latest on OpenGlobalRights: using the SDGs to curb authoritarian power and framing gun violence as a human rights issue https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-using-sdgs-to-curb-authoritarian-powe <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Recently on OpenGlobalRights, how Sustainable Development Goals might break human rights gridlock, why the right to bear arms is not a human right, and when human rights law is central to global health governance.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Recently on OpenGlobalRights, Ted Piccone argued that the rights-based development in the Sustainable Development Goals could help to <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Breaking-the-human-rights-gridlock-by-embracing-the-Sustainable-Development-Goals/?lang=English">break the rise of authoritarian powers</a>. In addition, Geoff Dancy argued that the <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/America-gun-violence-and-human-rights-Connecting-the-dot/?lang=English">right to bear arms is not a human right</a>, and guns are used far more often to violate human rights than the defend them. </p> <p>Matheus Hernandez continued the debate on the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, arguing that <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/The-UN-High-Commissioner-for-Human-Rights-a-difficult-but-do-able-mandate/?lang=English">the mandate is difficult but critical</a>, and Sukti Dhital discussed how <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Reimagining-justice-human-rights-through-legal-empowerment/?lang=English">legal empowerment is an effective way to reimagine justice</a>. Benjamin Mason Meier and Lawrence O. Gostin then argued that <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/From-revolution-to-bureaucratization-human-rights-law-becomes-central-to-global-health-governance/?lang=English">human rights law is central to global health governance</a>, while Kate Donald and Silke Staab evaluated whether the <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/The-SDGs-and-gender-equality-empty-promises-or-beacon-of-hope/?lang=English">SDGs could really deliver on gender equality</a>.</p> <p>We are continuously publishing new content and creating different themes for debate and dialogue, so stay informed by <a href="https://opendemocracy.us15.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=acf31f31349d04466ff82e3fb&amp;id=94909f1bd2">subscribing here</a> for weekly updates. Interested in writing for us? <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/write-for-openglobalrights/">Click here</a> for submission guidelines.</p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-holding-home-states-accountable-and-r">The latest on OpenGlobalRights: holding home states accountable and re-thinking transitional justice</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-gene-editing-activist-balance-and-eng">The latest on OpenGlobalRights: gene editing, the activist balance, and engaging corporations</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-ending-corporate-corruption-and-filli">The latest on OpenGlobalRights: ending corporate corruption and filling the data gap in human rights</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights The OGR Editorial Team Wed, 02 May 2018 08:00:00 +0000 The OGR Editorial Team 117613 at https://www.opendemocracy.net The latest on OpenGlobalRights: holding home states accountable and re-thinking transitional justice https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-holding-home-states-accountable-and-r <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Recently on OpenGlobalRights, authors debated how to hold home states accountable for human rights abuses by corporations and how to re-think transitional justice for different contexts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Recently on OpenGlobalRights, Daniel Cerqueira and Alexandra Montgomery discussed the promise a <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/New-treaty-on-business-and-human-rights-must-hold-home-states-accountable/?lang=English">new treaty on business and human rights</a> in holding home states accountable. Paul Seis then argued that <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/paul-seils/Transitional-justice-time-for-a-re-think/?lang=English">transitional justice cannot be applied in the same way</a> in every conflict, pointing out that it is time to re-think the entire concept.</p> <p>We are continuously publishing new content and creating different themes for debate and dialogue, so stay informed by <a href="https://opendemocracy.us15.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=acf31f31349d04466ff82e3fb&amp;id=94909f1bd2">subscribing here</a> for weekly updates. Interested in writing for us? <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/write-for-openglobalrights/">Click here</a> for submission guidelines.</p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-confronting-cartel-control-debating-f">The latest on OpenGlobalRights: confronting cartel control, debating foreign aid, and reframing sexual harassment </a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-defending-indigenous-rights-in-trump-">The latest on OpenGlobalRights: defending indigenous rights in the Trump era and illegal logging in South Sudan</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-ending-corporate-corruption-and-filli">The latest on OpenGlobalRights: ending corporate corruption and filling the data gap in human rights</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights The OGR Editorial Team Wed, 11 Apr 2018 08:00:00 +0000 The OGR Editorial Team 117159 at https://www.opendemocracy.net The latest on OpenGlobalRights: ending corporate corruption and filling the data gap in human rights https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-ending-corporate-corruption-and-filli <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Recently on OpenGlobalRights, authors debated how to end corporate corruption and why a new database on human rights performance could improve advocacy efforts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Recently on OpenGlobalRights, Gillian Caldwell argued that activists need to look at the North-South nexus in order <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Ending-corporate-corruption-means-looking-at-the-North-South-nexus/?lang=English">to end corporate corruption</a>. Anne-Marie Brook, Chad Clay, and Susan Randolph then discussed a <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Measuring-what-matters-a-new-database-to-track-human-rights-performance/?lang=English">new database to track human rights performance</a> and fill the data grap for human rights advocacy.</p> <p>We are continuously publishing new content and creating different themes for debate and dialogue, so stay informed by <a href="https://opendemocracy.us15.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=acf31f31349d04466ff82e3fb&amp;id=94909f1bd2">subscribing here</a> for weekly updates. Interested in writing for us? <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/write-for-openglobalrights/">Click here</a> for submission guidelines.</p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-defending-indigenous-rights-in-trump-">The latest on OpenGlobalRights: defending indigenous rights in the Trump era and illegal logging in South Sudan</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-gene-editing-activist-balance-and-eng">The latest on OpenGlobalRights: gene editing, the activist balance, and engaging corporations</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-confronting-cartel-control-debating-f">The latest on OpenGlobalRights: confronting cartel control, debating foreign aid, and reframing sexual harassment </a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights The OGR Editorial Team Wed, 04 Apr 2018 08:00:00 +0000 The OGR Editorial Team 117018 at https://www.opendemocracy.net The latest on OpenGlobalRights: defending indigenous rights in the Trump era and illegal logging in South Sudan https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-defending-indigenous-rights-in-trump- <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Recently on OpenGlobalRights, authors debated the challenges of defending indigenous human rights in the Trump era and the illegal logging that is fuelling conflict in South Sudan.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Recently on OpenGlobalRights, Tereza M. Szeghi examined the various challenges of <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Fighting-for-indigenous-rights-in-the-Trump-era/?lang=English">defending indigenous rights in America</a>, and the effect of President Trump’s human rights policies. Caroline Kiarie-Kimondo then discussed the rapid rise of <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Illegal-logging-fuels-conflict-and-violence-against-women-in-south-Sudan/?lang=English">illegal logging in South Sudan</a> and how this deforestation is fuelling the region’s conflict. Shayna Plaut explained the complexities of <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Learning-and-unlearning-the-alchemy-of-human-rights-education/?lang=English">effective human rights education</a>, and Pratima Gurung discussed how <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Collaborating-across-movements-to-fill-funding-gaps-for-women-in-Nepal/?lang=English">collaboration across movements</a> can fill funding gaps in Nepal.&nbsp;</p> <p>We are continuously publishing new content and creating different themes for debate and dialogue, so stay informed by <a href="https://opendemocracy.us15.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=acf31f31349d04466ff82e3fb&amp;id=94909f1bd2">subscribing here</a> for weekly updates. Interested in writing for us? <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/write-for-openglobalrights/">Click here</a> for submission guidelines. </p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-confronting-cartel-control-debating-f">The latest on OpenGlobalRights: confronting cartel control, debating foreign aid, and reframing sexual harassment </a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-gene-editing-activist-balance-and-eng">The latest on OpenGlobalRights: gene editing, the activist balance, and engaging corporations</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-hope-in-human-rights-progress-alo">Last week on OpenGlobal Rights: the hope in human rights progress alongside the inequality of the system</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights The OGR Editorial Team Wed, 28 Mar 2018 08:00:00 +0000 The OGR Editorial Team 116912 at https://www.opendemocracy.net The latest on OpenGlobalRights: confronting cartel control, debating foreign aid, and reframing sexual harassment https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-confronting-cartel-control-debating-f <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Recently on OpenGlobalRights, authors debated cartel control of utilities in Kenya, state repression in Thailand, lessons for human rights educators, sexual harassment as gender-based violence, and the trend of climate change lawsuits.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Recently on OpenGlobalRights, Collins Liko argued that community participation can mitigate the damaging effects of <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/community-participation-in-the-face-of-gatekeeping-lessons-from-Kenya/?lang=English">armed actors controlling public utilities</a>. Salvador Santino F. Regilme, Jr. then discussed how <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Using-foreig-aid-for-state-repression-in-Thailand/?lang=English">foreign aid can increase state repression</a> in Thailand and other countries. Sarah Knuckey and Su Anne Lee <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/building-the-foundations-of-resilience-11-lessons-for-human-rights-educators-and-supervisors/?lang=English">provided 11 lessons for human rights educators and supervisors</a>, and Sarah Dávila-Ruhaak argued that <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/reframing-sexual-harassment-as-gender-based-violence-the-value-of-a-rights-framework/?lang=English">reframing sexual harassment as gender-based violence</a> changes the possibilities around responsibility and recourse. Finally, Camila Bustos discussed a <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/New-climate-change-lawsuit-in-Colombia-part-of-growing-worldwide-trend/?lang=English">new climate change lawsuit in Colombia</a> that is part of a growing trend demanding better environmental protection.</p> <p>We are continuously publishing new content and creating different themes for debate and dialogue, so stay informed by <a href="https://opendemocracy.us15.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=acf31f31349d04466ff82e3fb&amp;id=94909f1bd2">subscribing here</a> for weekly updates. Interested in writing for us? <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/write-for-openglobalrights/">Click here</a> for submission guidelines.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-gene-editing-activist-balance-and-eng">The latest on OpenGlobalRights: gene editing, the activist balance, and engaging corporations</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-authors-debated-hard-data-women-s-rights-and-trump-s">Last week on OpenGlobal Rights: authors debated hard data, women’s rights, and Trump’s human rights record</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-governments-stifle-dissent-and-obscure-motivations-f">Last week on OpenGlobal Rights: governments stifle dissent and obscure motivations for violence against the Rohingya</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights The OGR Editorial Team Wed, 14 Mar 2018 09:00:00 +0000 The OGR Editorial Team 116647 at https://www.opendemocracy.net The latest on OpenGlobalRights: gene editing, the activist balance, and engaging corporations https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/latest-on-openglobalrights-gene-editing-activist-balance-and-eng <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Recently on OpenGlobalRights, authors debated the perils of gene editing, how to be globally connected but locally rooted, and what risks are needed to make human rights progress.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Recently on OpenGlobalRights, Marcy Darnovsky, Leah Lowthorp and Katie Hasson discussed <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/reproductive-gene-editing-imperils-universal-human-rights/?lang=English">why reproductive gene editing imperils human rights</a>. Urantsooj Gombosuren and Marte Hellema then outlined the challenges of being both <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/the-activist-balance-being-both-globally-connected-and-locally-rooted/?lang=English">globally connected and locally rooted</a> as an activist. Maria Bobenrieth argued that making progress in human rights requires <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/making-progress-in-human-rights-requires-big-risks-and-new-allies/?lang=English">taking risks and engaging with the corporate sector,</a> while Marc Limon questioned whether the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights is an <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/">impossible job after all</a>.</p> <p>We are continuously publishing new content and creating different themes for debate and dialogue, so stay informed by <a href="https://opendemocracy.us15.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=acf31f31349d04466ff82e3fb&amp;id=94909f1bd2">subscribing here</a> for weekly updates. Interested in writing for us? <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/write-for-openglobalrights/">Click here</a> for submission guidelines.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-authors-debated-hard-data-women-s-rights-and-trump-s">Last week on OpenGlobal Rights: authors debated hard data, women’s rights, and Trump’s human rights record</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-governments-stifle-dissent-and-obscure-motivations-f">Last week on OpenGlobal Rights: governments stifle dissent and obscure motivations for violence against the Rohingya</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-hope-in-human-rights-progress-alo">Last week on OpenGlobal Rights: the hope in human rights progress alongside the inequality of the system</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights The OGR Editorial Team Wed, 28 Feb 2018 09:00:00 +0000 The OGR Editorial Team 116380 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Last week on OpenGlobalRights: the complexities of being High Commissioner, defending LGBTI in Indonesia, and mapping human rights funding https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobalrights-complexities-of-being-high-commiss <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Last week on OpenGlobalRights, authors debated whether the High Commissioner for Human Rights job is do-able at all, how best to defend LGBTI communities in Indonesia, and why mapping human rights funding can improve advocacy.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Last week on <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/">OpenGlobalRights</a>, Devandy Ario Putro discussed how best to defend LGBTI people amidst <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/the-paradoxical-existence-of-the-lgbti-movement-in-indonesia/?lang=English">rising levels of intolerance in Indonesia</a>. David Petrasek then argued that the <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/another-one-bites-the-dust-what-future-for-the-un-high-commissioner-for-human-rights/?lang=English">early resignation of yet another High Commissioner for Human Rights</a> may be an indication that the job itself is not feasible. Finally, Anna Koob and Sarah Tansey discussed newly launched data that <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/mapping-trends-to-understand-shifts-in-human-rights-funding/?lang=English">maps out trends in human rights funding</a>, showing how such patterns can make advocacy more effective.</p> <p>We are continuously publishing new content and creating different themes for debate and dialogue, so stay informed by <a href="https://opendemocracy.us15.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=acf31f31349d04466ff82e3fb&amp;id=94909f1bd2">subscribing here</a> for weekly&nbsp;</p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobalrights-bridging-different-rights-movement">Last week on OpenGlobalRights: bridging different rights movements, shifting funding power, and re-imagining democracy.</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-online-documentation-and-advocati">Last week on OpenGlobal Rights: online documentation and advocating for environmental rights</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-protecting-landless-peoples-hiv-activism-and-right">Last week on OpenGlobalRights: protecting landless peoples, HIV activism, and the right to a healthy environment in the Americas</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights The OGR Editorial Team Wed, 14 Feb 2018 09:00:00 +0000 The OGR Editorial Team 116113 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Last week on OpenGlobal Rights: online documentation and advocating for environmental rights https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-online-documentation-and-advocati <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Last week on OpenGlobalRights, authors debated how best to use online information to document rights abuses and the need to push for the right to a healthy environment.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Last week on <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/">OpenGlobalRights</a>, Enrique Piraces discussed the importance of properly <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/collecting-preserving-and-verifying-online-evidence-of-human-rights-violations/?lang=English">preserving and verifying online</a> evidence of human rights violations, and how this evidence can strengthen advocacy. Marcos A. Orellana then argued that advocates must take advantage of new opportunities arising around the <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/time-to-act-recognizing-the-right-to-a-healthy-environment/?lang=English">right to a healthy environment</a>.</p> <p>We are continuously publishing new content and creating different themes for debate and dialogue, so stay informed by <a href="https://opendemocracy.us15.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=acf31f31349d04466ff82e3fb&amp;id=94909f1bd2">subscribing here</a> for weekly updates. Interested in writing for us? <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/write-for-openglobalrights/">Click here</a> for submission guidelines.</p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobalrights-bridging-different-rights-movement">Last week on OpenGlobalRights: bridging different rights movements, shifting funding power, and re-imagining democracy.</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-protecting-landless-peoples-hiv-activism-and-right">Last week on OpenGlobalRights: protecting landless peoples, HIV activism, and the right to a healthy environment in the Americas</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-governments-stifle-dissent-and-obscure-motivations-f">Last week on OpenGlobal Rights: governments stifle dissent and obscure motivations for violence against the Rohingya</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights The OGR Editorial Team Wed, 07 Feb 2018 09:00:00 +0000 The OGR Editorial Team 115993 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Last week on OpenGlobalRights: bridging different rights movements, shifting funding power, and re-imagining democracy. https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobalrights-bridging-different-rights-movement <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Last week on OpenGlobalRights, authors debated the value of cross-movement collaborations, the need to shift the power in human rights funding and decision-making, and how to re-imagine democracy in 2018.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Last week on OpenGlobalRights, Claudia Samcam discussed the value of using <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/using-cross-movement-collaborations-to-tackle-human-rights-complexities/?lang=English">cross-movement collaborations</a> to tackle the increasing complexity of human rights problems. Jenny Barry argued that funders will see more powerful results when they put <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/participatory-grantmaking-helps-to-shift-power-relations-in-mexico/?lang=English">decision-making into the hands of local activists</a>. Finally, Dhananjayan Sriskandarajah outlined the five key battles in 2018 that will face human rights defenders trying to <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/five-key-battles-for-re-imagining-democracy-i-a-radically-changed-world/?lang=English">re-imagine democracy in our rapidly changing world</a>.</p><p>We continuously publish new content and create different themes for debate and dialogue. Stay informed by&nbsp;<a href="https://opendemocracy.us15.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=acf31f31349d04466ff82e3fb&amp;id=94909f1bd2">subscribing here</a>&nbsp;for weekly updates. Interested in writing for us?&nbsp;<a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/write-for-openglobalrights/">Click here</a>&nbsp;for submission guidelines.</p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-protecting-landless-peoples-hiv-activism-and-right">Last week on OpenGlobalRights: protecting landless peoples, HIV activism, and the right to a healthy environment in the Americas</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-governments-stifle-dissent-and-obscure-motivations-f">Last week on OpenGlobal Rights: governments stifle dissent and obscure motivations for violence against the Rohingya</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-hope-in-human-rights-progress-alo">Last week on OpenGlobal Rights: the hope in human rights progress alongside the inequality of the system</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights The OGR Editorial Team Wed, 24 Jan 2018 09:00:00 +0000 The OGR Editorial Team 115773 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Last week on OpenGlobalRights: protecting landless peoples, HIV activism, and the right to a healthy environment in the Americas https://www.opendemocracy.net/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-protecting-landless-peoples-hiv-activism-and-right <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Last week on OpenGlobalRights, authors debated a UN convention to protect rural workers and landless peoples, why HIV activists use rights language, and the need for the Inter-American Human Rights system to catch up on climate change.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Last week on OpenGlobalRights, Shivani Chaudry discussed a <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/new-un-declaration-could-finally-protect-rural-and-landless-peoples/?lang=English">groundbreaking UN declaration</a> on protecting the human rights of peasants, rural workers, and landless peoples. Kristi Heather Kenyon argued that local <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/empowering-language-of-rights-underlies-increasing-use-in-hiv-advocacy/?lang=English">HIV activists are increasingly adopting rights language</a> for its empowerment effects, and not necessarily because they expect legal change. Finally, Juan Auz questioned why the Inter-American Human Rights System is lagging so far behind on climate change, arguing that a core problem is the <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/why-is-the-inter-american-human-rights-system-lagging-on-climate-change/?lang=English">absence of the right to a healthy environment</a> in the organization’s core human rights convention.</p> <p>We continuously publish new content and create different themes for debate and dialogue. Stay informed by&nbsp;<a href="https://opendemocracy.us15.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=acf31f31349d04466ff82e3fb&amp;id=94909f1bd2">subscribing here</a>&nbsp;for weekly updates. Interested in writing for us?&nbsp;<a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/write-for-openglobalrights/">Click here</a>&nbsp;for submission guidelines.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-governments-stifle-dissent-and-obscure-motivations-f">Last week on OpenGlobal Rights: governments stifle dissent and obscure motivations for violence against the Rohingya</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-hope-in-human-rights-progress-alo">Last week on OpenGlobal Rights: the hope in human rights progress alongside the inequality of the system</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-authors-debated-hard-data-women-s-rights-and-trump-s">Last week on OpenGlobal Rights: authors debated hard data, women’s rights, and Trump’s human rights record</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights The OGR Editorial Team Wed, 17 Jan 2018 09:00:00 +0000 The OGR Editorial Team 115683 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Last week on OpenGlobal Rights: governments stifle dissent and obscure motivations for violence against the Rohingya https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-governments-stifle-dissent-and-obscure-motivations-f <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Last week on OpenGlobalRights, authors debated how NGOs can speak out against governments that muzzle them, why activists should stop labelling the violence in Myanmar a religious conflict, and how science can help stop modern-day slavery.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Last week on OpenGlobalRights, David Kode outlined that rising clampdowns in many countries on NGOs that <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/as-ngos-speak-out-expect-clampdowns-to-grow/?lang=English">speak out against their governments</a>. Elizabeth Shakman Hurd argued that the repeated insistence to label the <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/religious-rights-advocacy-will-not-save-the-rohingya-but-what-will/?lang=English">violence in Myanmar against the Rohingya</a> as a religious conflict obscures the real issues at hand. Finally, Zoe Trodd wrote about the challenges of ending modern day slavery and a new <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/finding-research-pathways-to-a-slavery-free-world/?lang=English">science-based research agenda</a> that hopes to tackle this problem.</p><p>We continuously publish new content and create different themes for debate and dialogue. Stay informed by&nbsp;<a href="https://opendemocracy.us15.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=acf31f31349d04466ff82e3fb&amp;id=94909f1bd2">subscribing here</a>&nbsp;for weekly updates. Interested in writing for us?&nbsp;<a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/write-for-openglobalrights/">Click here</a>&nbsp;for submission guidelines.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-hope-in-human-rights-progress-alo">Last week on OpenGlobal Rights: the hope in human rights progress alongside the inequality of the system</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobalrights-bad-faith-effective-campaigning-an">Last week on OpenGlobalRights: bad faith, effective campaigning and climate protectors</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-authors-debated-hard-data-women-s-rights-and-trump-s">Last week on OpenGlobal Rights: authors debated hard data, women’s rights, and Trump’s human rights record</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobalrights-corporate-responsibility-prison-po">Last week on OpenGlobalRights: corporate responsibility, prison populations, and forced migration</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights The OGR Editorial Team Wed, 13 Dec 2017 09:00:00 +0000 The OGR Editorial Team 115274 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Last week on OpenGlobal Rights: the hope in human rights progress alongside the inequality of the system https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-hope-in-human-rights-progress-alo <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Last week on OpenGlobalRights, authors debated whether there is evidence for hope in human rights progress, along with questions on how to change the systematic inequality between global North and global South human rights organizations.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Last week on OpenGlobalRights, Kathryn Sikkink presented <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/evidence-indicates-that-we-should-be-hopeful-not-hopeless-about-human-rights/?lang=English">evidence showing that we should be hopeful</a>—and not hopeless—about the future of human rights. In addition, Barbara Klugman and her colleagues contributed two pieces on the inequality of the human rights system: one that discusses the importance of <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/finding-equity-shifting-power-structures-in-human-rights/?lang=English">shifting power dynamics in human rights</a>, and another which argues how <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/addressing-systemic-inequality-in-human-rights-funding/?lang=English">human rights funding is systematically inequitable</a>—and how to fix it.</p><p>We continuously publish new content and create different themes for debate and dialogue. Stay informed by&nbsp;<a href="https://opendemocracy.us15.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=acf31f31349d04466ff82e3fb&amp;id=94909f1bd2">subscribing here</a>&nbsp;for weekly updates. Interested in writing for us?&nbsp;<a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/write-for-openglobalrights/">Click here</a>&nbsp;for submission guidelines.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-authors-debated-hard-data-women-s-rights-and-trump-s">Last week on OpenGlobal Rights: authors debated hard data, women’s rights, and Trump’s human rights record</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobalrights-bad-faith-effective-campaigning-an">Last week on OpenGlobalRights: bad faith, effective campaigning and climate protectors</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobalrights-climate-change-women-s-health-and-">Last week on OpenGlobalRights: climate change, women’s health, and the “dirt” on clean energy</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights The OGR Editorial Team Wed, 06 Dec 2017 09:00:00 +0000 The OGR Editorial Team 115098 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Last week on OpenGlobal Rights: authors debated hard data, women’s rights, and Trump’s human rights record https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/last-week-on-openglobal-rights-authors-debated-hard-data-women-s-rights-and-trump-s <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Last week on OpenGlobalRights, authors debated the value of hard data, the importance of funding young feminists, women’s rights, Trump’s human rights record, and the value of diversity in the human rights system.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Last week on OpenGlobalRights, César Rodríguez-Garavito discussed a new collaboration in Colombia that is bringing scientists and activists together <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/scientists-and-activists-collaborate-to-bring-hard-data-into-advocacy/?lang=English">to use hard data in advocacy efforts</a>. Next, Felogene Anumo and Ruby Johnson argued that <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/to-strengthen-global-resistance-resource-young-feminists/?lang=English">young feminists need more resources</a> to continue their work in global resistance, and James Ron presented survey evidence showing that most people believe that <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/survey-many-believe-human-rights-are-womens-rights/?lang=English">women’s rights are in fact human rights</a>. David Forsythe then commented on how <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/survey-many-believe-human-rights-are-womens-rights/?lang=English">Trump is not deviating very far</a> from America’s general track record on human rights. Finally, Barbara Klugman and her colleagues discussed the <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/the-value-of-diversity-in-creating-systemic-change-for-human-rights/?lang=English">importance of diversity in creating systemic change</a> in human rights.</p><p>We continuously publish new content and create different themes for debate and dialogue. Stay informed by&nbsp;<a href="https://opendemocracy.us15.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=acf31f31349d04466ff82e3fb&amp;id=94909f1bd2">subscribing here</a>&nbsp;for weekly updates. Interested in writing for us?&nbsp;<a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/write-for-openglobalrights/">Click here</a>&nbsp;for submission guidelines.</p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobalrights-bad-faith-effective-campaigning-an">Last week on OpenGlobalRights: bad faith, effective campaigning and climate protectors</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobalrights-climate-change-women-s-health-and-">Last week on OpenGlobalRights: climate change, women’s health, and the “dirt” on clean energy</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobalrights-communities-influence-investment-b">Last week on OpenGlobalRights: communities influence investment banks but the UN loses credibility </a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobalrights-corporate-responsibility-prison-po">Last week on OpenGlobalRights: corporate responsibility, prison populations, and forced migration</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights The OGR Editorial Team Wed, 29 Nov 2017 09:00:00 +0000 The OGR Editorial Team 114955 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Last week on OpenGlobalRights: communities influence investment banks but the UN loses credibility https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobalrights-communities-influence-investment-b <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Last week on OpenGlobalRights, authors debated whether community-led activism can influence big investment banks, how the “three generations” theory of human rights should be debunked, and why people in the global South do not trust the UN.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Last week on OpenGlobalRights, John Mwebe and Preksha Kumar discuss Malawi’s Lilongwe water project as an example of how <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/using-community-led-activism-and-public-opinion-to-stop-harmful-development/?lang=English">community-led activism and research can influence investment banks</a>. Steven L.B. Jensen then sparked debate by declaring that the <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/putting-to-rest-the-three-generations-theory-of-human-rights/?lang=English">“three generations” theory of human rights</a> has no historical or analytical basis, and in fact obscures the relationship between rights. Next, Kristi Heather Kenyon argued that the <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/building-up-vs-trickling-down-human-rights-in-southern-africa/?lang=English">history and culture of each country</a> determine whether “top down” or “bottom up” human rights strategies will be effective. Finally, Charles T. Call, David Crow and James Ron examine the apparent contradiction that many Republicans believe the UN curbs America’s interests, yet people in the global South often <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/order-from-chaos-is-the-UN-a-friend-or-foe/order-from-chaos-is-the-un-a-friend-or-foe/?lang=English">view the UN as a tool of the United States</a>.</p> <p>We continuously publish new content and create different themes for debate and dialogue. Stay informed by&nbsp;<a href="https://opendemocracy.us15.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=acf31f31349d04466ff82e3fb&amp;id=94909f1bd2">subscribing here</a>&nbsp;for weekly updates. Interested in writing for us?&nbsp;<a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/write-for-openglobalrights/">Click here</a>&nbsp;for submission guidelines.</p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobalrights-bad-faith-effective-campaigning-an">Last week on OpenGlobalRights: bad faith, effective campaigning and climate protectors</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobalrights-climate-change-women-s-health-and-">Last week on OpenGlobalRights: climate change, women’s health, and the “dirt” on clean energy</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobalrights-corporate-responsibility-prison-po">Last week on OpenGlobalRights: corporate responsibility, prison populations, and forced migration</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights The OGR Editorial Team Wed, 22 Nov 2017 20:11:43 +0000 The OGR Editorial Team 114843 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Last week on OpenGlobalRights: climate change, women’s health, and the “dirt” on clean energy https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobalrights-climate-change-women-s-health-and- <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Last week on OpenGlobalRights, authors debated childrens’ and women’s rights in relation to climate change, the value in watering down rights rhetoric, and false promises behind “clean” energy.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Last week on OpenGlobalRights, as part of our <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/climate-change-and-human-rights/">newly launched theme on climate change</a>, Alice Thomas highlighted how <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/climate-change-talks-must-focus-on-the-most-vulnerable-the-worlds-children/?lang=English">children are bearing the brunt of climate change</a> yet are being left out of climate negotiations. Leah Davidson continued this discussion with her article on <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/intergenerational-commitments-are-critical-to%20protecting-future-climate-leaders/?lang=English">the importance of intergenerational cooperation</a> to combat the detrimental effects of climate change. In addition, Eniko Horvath and Christen Dobson noted that in new developments with supposedly <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/putting-human-rights-at-the-centre-of-the-renewable-energy-sector/?lang=English">“clean” renewable energy, human rights must take priority,</a> while Hwei Mian Lim put forward a compelling argument on how <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/climate-change-exacerbates-gender-inequality-putting-womens-health-at-risk/?lang=English">climate change is putting women’s health at risk</a>. Lastly, Astrid Puentes Riaño presented the case of Brazil’s Belo Monte dam as <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/how-not-to-produce-energy-lessons-from-brazils-belo-monte-dam/?lang=English">a tragic example of how <em>not</em> to produce clean energy</a>.</p> <p>We are also partnering with the University of Dayton Human Rights Center to discuss the <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/SPHR17/">social practice of human rights</a>, and in this new series, Tony Talbott suggested that <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/human-rights-light-using-rhetoric-to-unite-disparate-disciplines/?lang=English">watering down human rights rhetoric</a> could actually help strengthen human rights in some circumstances.</p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobalrights-corporate-responsibility-prison-po">Last week on OpenGlobalRights: corporate responsibility, prison populations, and forced migration</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobalrights-bad-faith-effective-campaigning-an">Last week on OpenGlobalRights: bad faith, effective campaigning and climate protectors</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/ogr-editorial-team/recently-on-openglobalrights-authors-debate-human-rights-relationship-as-democrac">Recently on OpenGlobalRights: authors debate human rights&#039; relationship as democracy declines</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/recently-on-openglobalrights-authors-debate-rising-threats-and-c">Recently on OpenGlobalRights: authors debate rising threats and challenges in human rights</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights The OGR Editorial Team Wed, 15 Nov 2017 18:49:31 +0000 The OGR Editorial Team 114682 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Last week on OpenGlobalRights: bad faith, effective campaigning and climate protectors https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobalrights-bad-faith-effective-campaigning-an <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Over the last week&nbsp;<a href="http://www.openglobalrights.org">OpenGlobalRights</a> authors debated what makes an effective campaign, the Achilles’ heel of the European Court of Human Rights and launched a series on <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/climate-change-and-human-rights/">climate change and human rights.</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Over the last week on OpenGlobalRights, Cosette Creamer and her colleagues discussed <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/what-makes-a-human-rights-campaign-effective/?lang=English">what ingredients make for an effective human rights campaign.</a> Sergei Golubok then argued that the <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/the-achilles-heel-of%20the-european-court-of-human-rights/?lang=English">rampant bad faith in the European Court of Human Rights</a> has destroyed that organization’s credibility. Finally Katharina Rall launched our climate series by outlining how important it is to include the <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/protecting-environmental-defenders-should-be-a-central-issue-at-climate-talks/?lang=English">protection of environmental rights defenders</a> in climate talks. And, Alice Thomas discusses the <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/climate-change-talks-must-focus-on-the-most-vulnerable-the-worlds-children/?lang=English">effects of climate change on children’s rights.</a></p> <p>The new series will continue with pieces Leah Davidson on the effects of climate change on children’s rights and the importance of intergenerational commitments. After that, Eniko Horvath and Christen Dobson will weigh in by asserting that “clean” energy must include a clean bill of human rights. Finally, at the end of the week, Hwei Mian Lim will discuss how climate change puts women’s sexual and reproductive rights at risk.</p><p>We are continuously publishing new content and creating different themes for debate and dialogue, so stay informed by&nbsp;<a href="https://opendemocracy.us15.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=acf31f31349d04466ff82e3fb&amp;id=94909f1bd2">subscribing here</a>&nbsp;for weekly updates. Interested in writing for us?&nbsp;<a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/write-for-openglobalrights/">Click here</a>&nbsp;for submission guidelines.</p><div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights The OGR Editorial Team Wed, 01 Nov 2017 14:30:00 +0000 The OGR Editorial Team 114382 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Last week on OpenGlobalRights: corporate responsibility, prison populations, and forced migration https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/last-week-on-openglobalrights-corporate-responsibility-prison-po <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Last week on OpenGlobalRights, authors debated corporate information sharing, drug reform and prisons in Latin America, the US role in forced migration, and more.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Last week on OpenGlobalRights, Audrey Gaughran discussed the need for legal reform to ensure that <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/human-right-%20justice-requires-corporate-information-sharing/?lang=English">human rights victims have access</a> to information, and Azadeh Shahshahani argued that the <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/the-us-role-in-forced-migration-from-the-middle-east/?lang=English">US role in forced migration</a> from the Middle East is a neglected area of the refugee debate. In addition, Ana Jimena Bautista wrote about the need to reform drug laws to reduce <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/reforming-drug-laws-to-reduce-prison-populations-in-latin-america/?lang=English">prison populations in Latin America</a>. And finally, Augusta Hagen-Dillon demonstrated how women’s funds are getting creative to address the <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/creative-persistence-womens-funds-responses-to-the-backlash-against-feminism/?lang=English">rising backlash on women’s rights</a>.</p><p>We are continuously publishing new content and creating different themes for debate and dialogue, so stay informed by&nbsp;<a href="https://opendemocracy.us15.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=acf31f31349d04466ff82e3fb&amp;id=94909f1bd2">subscribing here</a>&nbsp;for weekly updates. Interested in writing for us?&nbsp;<a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/write-for-openglobalrights/">Click here</a>&nbsp;for submission guidelines.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights The OGR Editorial Team Wed, 25 Oct 2017 08:00:00 +0000 The OGR Editorial Team 114242 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Recently on OpenGlobalRights: authors debate human rights' relationship as democracy declines https://www.opendemocracy.net/ogr-editorial-team/recently-on-openglobalrights-authors-debate-human-rights-relationship-as-democrac <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Catch up on <a href="http://www.openglobalrights.org/">OpenGlobalRights,</a> where recent articles discuss effective coalition building, using court judgements to uphold human rights, elections at the UN Human Rights Council, and the decline of human rights institutions in the face of populist democracies.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>For the past few weeks in our <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/perspectives/">Perspectives</a> section, authors from across the world have debated issues from court judgements pushing back against political leaders to the rising tensions between democracy and human rights institutions.&nbsp;</p> <p>In September, Andrew Hudson discussed <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Creating-effective-new-coalitions-in-tough-political-times/?lang=English">strategies for creating effective coalitions</a> in turbulent political climates, while James A. Goldston analyzed how courts across the world <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/court-judgements-are-shaking-political-foundations-and-upholding-rights/?lang=English">are standing up to political leaders</a> to uphold human rights. K. Chad Clay discussed new efforts to <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/measuring-globally-surveying-locally/?lang=English">measure civil and political rights,</a> and Joel R. Pruce encouraged the human rights community to <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/research-offers-tough-love-to-improve-human-rights-practices/?lang=English">rethink its habits</a>. Finally, Peter Splinter made a call for <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/research-offers-tough-love-to-improve-human-rights-practices/?lang=English">new leadership in the UN Human Rights Council</a>.</p> <p>So far in October, Lisa Sundstrom has asked whether <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Irreconcilable-tensions-Global-human-rights-institutions-and-democracy/?lang=English">democracy and human rights institutions</a> are becoming irreconcilable, and in this debate Alison Brysk examines <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Contesting-regression-citizen-solidarity-vs-the-decline-of-democracy/?lang=English">citizen solidarity</a> and the decline in democracy. Stephen Hopgood discusses recent events in Myanmar and asks whether human rights are <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Losing-the-Battle-for-Hearts-and-Minds/?lang=English">losing ground to populist leaders,</a> and Peter Splinter reveals that <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/election-without-choice-clean%20slates-in-the-human-rights-council/?lang=English">upcoming “elections”</a> in the UN Human Rights Council make a mockery of the institution.</p><p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/SundstromOctober.jpg" alt="" width="460" /></p><p><em><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/fibonacciblue/36388874012/in/photolist-Xryutw-WuaHMo-XrTiuD-bCWPV2-kWDwgf-dmjaUC-kWBXat-dmj42Y-kWCBsD-kWCDFg-iddjYp-kWDzCq-kWBZav-X41gfG-X41gY5-X9m8r5-XGshf8-WofUHs-XCkJEb-WvWfSK-X41pe7-Xpbcoq-XGqCwp-Xu8PRF-Xpbbkd-X41h69-7BLR4k-XrTxoF-XE39MH-X41fLW-XzWWr5-X41grU-XuxAGs-XE39wc-X9m91b-X41oZu-X6iReY-XBceZc-XzWtyN-WofUEw-Xrs21h-X41mjQ-XzWsGh-XXBncq-DMmR49-XpbcEY-XpbbHs-X41o1q-XzWvkU-X41mF1" target="_blank">Flickr</a>/<a title="Go to Fibonacci Blue&#039;s photostream" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/fibonacciblue/">Fibonacci Blue</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/" target="_blank">CC BY 2.0</a>(Some Rights Reserved).&nbsp;<span class="image-caption">The recent violent white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, and Trump’s reticence to criticize those groups given his electoral base, is one example of the perverse impact that populist forces can have on politicians’ commitment to human rights.</span></em></p><hr /><p>&nbsp;</p><p>We are continuously publishing new content and creating different themes for debate and dialogue, so stay informed by <a href="https://opendemocracy.us15.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=acf31f31349d04466ff82e3fb&amp;id=94909f1bd2">subscribing here</a> for weekly updates. Interested in writing for us? <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/write-for-openglobalrights/">Click here</a> for submission guidelines.</p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/recently-on-openglobalrights-authors-debate-rising-threats-and-c">Recently on OpenGlobalRights: authors debate rising threats and challenges in human rights</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights The OGR Editorial Team Wed, 18 Oct 2017 13:00:00 +0000 The OGR Editorial Team 114076 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Recently on OpenGlobalRights: authors debate rising threats and challenges in human rights https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/ogr-editorial-team/recently-on-openglobalrights-authors-debate-rising-threats-and-c <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Catch up on OpenGlobalRights lastest publications, where recent articles discuss security threats to activists, closing space in Nigeria, tax structures that enable corporations to hide culpable actors, and more.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Over the last couple of months, <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/">OpenGlobalRights</a> launched its new website and has been expanding on the themes from our previous site at openDemocracy. In our <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/perspectives/">Perspectives</a> section, authors from across the world have debated the rising threats against human rights defenders, closing space for civil society, how to improve funding opportunities, social science experiments, the use of polling data in human rights messaging, and much more.</p> <p>In July, Padre Melo <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/new-threats-against-human-rights-defenders-require-new-kinds-of-protection1/">discussed new threats </a>that are arising against human rights defenders and how organizations must adapt their security measures to offer adequate protection. David Forsythe <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/hard-times-for-human-rights/?lang=English">outlined the many challenges</a> facing the human rights movement but debated whether these “hard times” were simply the expected ups and downs of liberal norms and principals. Nick Robinson emphasized how important it is <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/defining-rather-than-defending-our-human-rights-moment/?lang=English">to reframe and adapt</a> human rights to global shifts, rather than constantly defending the existing rights movements. Christa Blackmon explored the ways in which <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/breaking-the-fourth-wall-theater-as-human-rights-activism/?lang=English">theatre can complement and even become activism</a>, and Sadhana Shrestha wrote about <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/building-communities-to-boost-local-fundraising/">the importance of building communities</a> and local ownership in order to boost fundraising opportunities. In addition, Garth Meintjes argued that <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/public-interest-lawyers-need-new-tools-to-protect-the-vulnerable/">public interest lawyers</a> need to start exploring new tools to protect vulnerable populations.</p> <p>In August, Joe Braun and Stephen Arves <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Tailorin-%20the-message-How-the-political-left-and-right-think-differently-about-human-rights/">provided scientific evidence</a> on how the political left and right think differently about human rights, and why human rights activists need to use this data to tailor their messaging. Paul Beckett explained the problems inherent in certain “orphan” tax structures that enable corporations to <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Hard-times-but-human-rights-defenders/?lang=English">hide who is responsible</a> for rights violations, and Victoria Ohaeri discussed the <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Ho-%20to-confront-restrictive-legislation-in-Nigeria/">closing space in Nigerian civil society</a> and outlined ways in which activists can confront new and restrictive legislation. Samira Bueno and Renato Sérgio de Lima used public opinion polls to demonstrate how both the state and the general public in Brazil have <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/the-legitimization-of-violence-to-solve-social-problems-in-brazil/">legitimized violence as a solution to social problems</a>, and Geoff Dancy articulated several ways in which the <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Why-an-anti-ICC-narrative-may-help-Kenyan-leaders-win-votes/">anti-ICC narrative growing in Africa</a> has been helping Kenyan leaders win votes. Marc Limon <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/the-world-is-marching-towards-not-away-from-universal-human-rights/?lang=English">disagreed with pessimism</a> about the state of human rights and argued that the world is actually moving towards universality, while Andrew Anderson acknowledged that <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Hard-times-but-human-rights-defenders/?lang=English">human rights are indeed in peril</a>, but human rights defenders are highly resilient. Julius Ibrani and Marte Hellema then <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Indonesia-at-a-threshold-reinventing-the-human-rights-movement/?lang=English">analyzed the political situation in Indonesia</a> and argued that the country’s human rights movement will need to reinvent itself to have any real impact.</p><p dir="ltr"><br /><span><img src="https://www.openglobalrights.org/userfiles/file/A_%20September.jpg" alt="" width="600" /><span>Protesters in Emancipation Park in Charlottesville on August 12, 2017.&nbsp;Flickr/</span><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/rodneydunning/36511075226/" target="_blank">Rodney Dunning</a><span>/</span><a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/" target="_blank">CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a><span>&nbsp;(Some Rights Reserved).</span></span></p> <p>In our latest articles in September, Myrella Saadeh describes the <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/The-forgotten-advocates-of-children&#039;s-rights-in-Guatemala/">failure of the Guatemalan government</a> to protect the country’s children and discusses mounting threats facing Guatemala’s child rights advocates. Finally, Kayum Ahmed outlines t<a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/Defending-free-speech-when-laws-do-not-apply-equally-to-everyone/?lang=English">he ACLU’s problematic use of free speech</a> when it comes to defending white supremacists and what that means for human rights defenders.&nbsp;</p> <p>We are continuously publishing new content and creating different themes for debate and dialogue. Stay informed by <a href="https://opendemocracy.us15.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=acf31f31349d04466ff82e3fb&amp;id=94909f1bd2">subscribing here</a> for weekly updates. Interested in writing for us? <a href="https://www.openglobalrights.org/write-for-openglobalrights/">Click here</a> for submission guidelines. We consider new submissions on a rolling basis. Interested in collaborating with us on a new articles series or otherwise? Get in touch with us at info@openglobalrights.org.</p><div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights The OGR Editorial Team Wed, 06 Sep 2017 06:00:00 +0000 The OGR Editorial Team 113204 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Integrating a psychosocial perspective in human rights works https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/maik-m-ller/integrating-psychosocial-perspective-in-human-rights-works <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/MullerJune.jpg" alt="" width="140" /></p><p dir="ltr">Integrating a psychosocial perspective requires the incorporation of psychosocial support and self-care into job descriptions and work plans. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/mental-health-and-well-being-in-human-rights" target="_blank">mental health and human rights</a>. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/maik-m-ller/la-integraci-n-de-una-perspectiva-psicosocial-en-el-trabajo-de-derechos">Español</a></em></strong>.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <p dir="ltr">Through my work with <a href="http://www.peacebrigades.org/" target="_blank">Peace Brigades International (PBI</a>), I’ve been in contact with diverse members of local and international NGOs working on human rights, but few—if any—of these organisations have integrated a clear approach to counteracting the negative psychosocial impacts of human rights work in repressive contexts. </p><p dir="ltr">As an independent consultant, I recently worked with PBI to document and systemize the work done by <a href="http://www.pbi-mexico.org/" target="_blank">PBI Mexico</a> over the last 10 years, and our <a href="http://bit.ly/estudiopsico" target="_blank">case study</a> indicates that the inclusion of a psychosocial perspective can be an important mechanism to strengthen human rights organisations and their members. In our surveys and interviews, past and current members of the organization gave a variety of examples of how integration of the psychosocial perspective—in addition to specific tools and procedures—led to increased resilience, decreased internal conflicts, and improvements in protection and security work. </p><p class="mag-quote-center" dir="ltr">People who are aware of the psychosocial impacts of repression are more willing to prioritise adequate self-care.</p><p dir="ltr">Our interviews and surveys found that sensitisation and awareness raising about the psychosocial impacts of political violence (and human rights work in such contexts) were key—people who are aware of the psychosocial impacts of repression are more willing to prioritise adequate self-care. </p><p dir="ltr">To increase this awareness, PBI offered regular mental health workshops facilitated by an external expert, which addressed the impacts of violence and the problems that members of the organization deal with in their daily work. PBI also facilitated self-organized workshops, which are set up and managed by the teams in order to work on any issues related to mental health. These workshops—utilizing existing tools, knowledge, capacities and previous experiences of each member—helped staff and volunteers to recognise negative impacts and to develop strategies to prevent, cope with or counteract these effects.</p><p dir="ltr">Another important tool that the organization introduced was “check-ins”: these were spaces at the beginning of meetings (in person or virtual) where each person can comment on how they are doing and about aspects that influence their well-being (work-related or personal) and in which members can hear from others about how they are doing, express needs, concerns. The excessive workload and the dynamics of human rights work in the field can lead to situations in which team members do not know how their teammates are doing, and this lack of exchange can lead to misunderstandings, friction and conflicts. Proper use of check-ins can be a useful tool for preventing conflict and to promote mutual support. The tool helped to get staff and volunteers used to including expression of emotions and (the lack of) “well-being” into certain spaces, and in many occasions team members noted an increase in their empathy for each other.</p> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Begins--> <div style="color: #999999; font-size: 11px; line-height: normal; font-style: italic; text-align: right;"> <img style="max-width: 100%; background-color: #ffffff; padding: 7px; border: 1px solid #999999;" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/MullerJune.jpg" alt="" width="444" /> <br />Flickr/Jonathan McIntosh (Some rights reserved) </div> <p style="color: #666666; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;">"Paseo de Humanidad" (Parade of Humanity), a painted metal mural, is attached to the Mexican side of the US border wall in the city of Heroica Nogales. </p> <hr style="color: #d2d3d5; background-color: #d2d3d5; height: 1px; width: 85%; border: none; text-align: center; margin: 0 auto;" /> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Ends--> <p dir="ltr">In addition, PBI Mexico created “mental health minimums”, which are individual commitments by all team members to practice self-care and maintain a good state of mental health during the year in the field. These minimum commitments are different for each team member and involve simple things such as doing sports at least once a week, writing daily, and going to dance classes.</p><p dir="ltr">They are the result of an individual reflection process (sometimes promoted and/or guided in a workshop) and are shared with the other members of the team so that everyone is aware of each other’s needs. The implementation of these minimums is done individually but if stress dynamics linked to a lack of implementation arise, the team uses the workshops and/or the “check-ins” to follow-up as a collective. As such, the minimums help with conflicts about different perspectives on work management and self-care. </p><p dir="ltr">The organization also decided to rotate certain tasks considering the mental health of the team members. One example is the person who is on-call. This person is responsible for checking the phone and e-mail in order to respond to emergency situations, and PBI has taken care to avoid exposing the same people to the most difficult testimonies, such as victims of torture and forced disappearances. “During my year, the hardest moments for me emotionally were listening to testimonies of mothers of disappeared people”, stated one of the volunteers. During the workshops, the external expert provided tools to better deal with such situations and at the same time the rotation system avoided constant exposure to these testimonies.</p><p dir="ltr">Finally, PBI offered individual support programs with therapists through Skype. This is an external service to support employees and volunteers so that they can prevent and/or cope with situations or periods of stress and/or emotional charge. PBI has a working agreement with the <a href="http://www.eagt.org" target="_blank">European Gestalt Therapy Association</a> where members can request individual pro-bono counselling at any time throughout their service (before, during and after the volunteer year, and also for paid staff) in order to prevent burnout and secondary trauma. At the beginning of the collaboration volunteers and staff did not used this specific service much. PBI Mexico started to promote this opportunity for support and integrated further information about this service in training and orientation of staff and volunteers alike. Now there is a regular use of the service and in the questionnaires and interviews several people stressed the importance of this tool.</p><p dir="ltr">PBI Mexico made extensive use of an external professional expert to support field teams to address the negative psychosocial impacts of the dynamics inherent to frontline human rights work. Before this collaboration (ten years ago) there was little work on mental health and the accompaniment work of PBI Mexico did not consider well (if at all) psychosocial aspects of the security and protection work for human rights defenders. While there was initially resistance from some members, people were rapidly convinced once they experienced the support. Over time the collaboration with the external expert led to the integration of a psychosocial approach in the internal and external work of the organization. One public example of this integration is PBI Mexico’s <a href="https://issuu.com/peacebrigadesinternational/docs/pbiprogramaseguridad" target="_blank">facilitator’s guide</a> for security and protection workshops, which explicitly integrates a psychosocial perspective in each training module.</p><p dir="ltr">Although we found that workshops with the external expert were especially important, it was the combination of the different tools and procedures that led to a proper integration of the psychosocial perspective. The ongoing support via the regular workshops helped to develop or adjust these tools and procedures to make them more effective. We found that participative processes were important, as commitment and implementation depends on buy-in from all team members—coping mechanisms should not be imposed from the outside, in order to avoid resistance and/or dependence on intervention. Our study also illustrates the need to create an organizational culture that not only allows and promotes the use of time and resources for well-being and mental health, but actually integrates it as important part of the human rights work that is obligatory, reflected in work plans and job descriptions. Unless this incorporation happens, we observed that self-care gets lost or de-prioritized in the frequently overloaded agendas of HRDs and their organisations.</p><p dir="ltr">The horizontal and participatory working approach of PBI has certainly facilitated progress, but most of the tools and procedures described can be integrated and adapted by other local and international NGOs alike. In addition, a similar type of case study to what we completed could also help organizations identify their specific needs.</p><p dir="ltr">Of course, a cultural shift and strong effort to raise awareness are still required in order to foster well-being and counter negative impacts of repression within the sector. But profound changes in the staff and organisation are possible with proper investment in and implementation of psychosocial support.</p><p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image 0'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title="imgupl_floating_none"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_large/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" alt="" title="imgupl_floating_none" width="300" height="115" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload 0 imagecache imagecache-article_large" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'></span></span></p> <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0; URL='https://www.openglobalrights.org/integrating-psychosocial-perspective-in-human-rights-works/'" /><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="http://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/OpenGlobalRights-highlight4English.png" alt="" width="140" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-sidebox"> <div class="field-label"> Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/mental-health-and-well-being-in-human-rights" onmouseout="document.Imgs.src='https://opendemocracy.net/files/Mental-health_inset_1.png'" onmouseover="document.Imgs.src=' https://opendemocracy.net/files/Mental-health_inset_2.png'"><img width="140" alt="“Data" border="0" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/Mental-health_inset_1.png" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/yara-sallam/no-one-warned-me-trade-off-between-self-care-and-effective-activism">“No One Warned Me”: the trade-off between self-care and effective activism</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/deepa-ranganathan-mar-d-az-ezquerro/making-our-movements-sustainable-practicing-holistic-security-ev">Making our movements sustainable: practicing holistic security every day</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/shena-cavallo-jocelyn-berger-michelle-truong/revolutions-are-built-on-hope-role-of-">Revolutions are built on hope: the role of funders in collective self-care</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/meerim-ilyas-tatiana-cordero-vel-squez/collective-care-in-human-rights-funding-poli">Collective care in human rights funding: a political stand</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/kristi-pinderi/when-advocacy-work-builds-resilience-everyone-benefits">When advocacy work builds resilience, everyone benefits</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/zelalem-kibret/ready-for-anything-how-preparation-can-improve-trauma-recovery">Ready for anything: how preparation can improve trauma recovery</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/holly-davis-magda-adamowicz/security-and-well-being-two-sides-of-same-coin">Security and well-being: two sides of the same coin</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/alexandra-zetes/turning-weakness-into-strength-lessons-as-new-advocate">Turning weakness into strength: lessons as a new advocate</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/sam-dubberley/when-watching-violence-is-your-job-workers-on-digital-frontline">When watching violence is your job: workers on the digital frontline</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights Maik Müller Central and South America, & the Caribbean Mental Health and Well-being in Human Rights Tue, 27 Jun 2017 08:30:00 +0000 Maik Müller 111908 at https://www.opendemocracy.net “No One Warned Me”: the trade-off between self-care and effective activism https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/yara-sallam/no-one-warned-me-trade-off-between-self-care-and-effective-activism <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/SallemJune.jpg" alt="" width="140" /></p><p dir="ltr">Is there a trade off between protecting your mental health as an activist and doing effective work? A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/mental-health-and-well-being-in-human-rights" target="_blank">mental health and human rights</a>. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/yara-sallam" target="_blank">العربية.</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p dir="ltr">While reflecting on my human rights career thus far, I remember getting advice in passing on staying “detached” from my work, with no guidance on how to apply this in a practical manner. How does an activist remain engaged and passionate while also being detached? And is there a point at which we are too detached and then cannot empathize with the people for whom we are advocating? </p><p dir="ltr">In 2007, shortly after graduation, I was fortunate enough to work with one of my professors on a research project on women who go to courts to get divorce. As part of the research, I conducted interviews with lawyers and women who approached women’s rights associations, due to their inability to afford divorce costs. I do not remember being warned about the mixed emotions and personal stories that I would encounter and how that would affect me. At the end of that year, I started working at the <a href="http://www.eipr.org/" target="_blank">Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights</a> (EIPR), and the first file I worked on was monitoring and documenting violations of the freedom of religion and belief. But again, I was not warned about the heavy emotions. I had not received any training or advice on how to separate myself from my work, and that lack of preparation and awareness affected me for years to come.</p><p dir="ltr" class="mag-quote-center">I started drifting away from all of the religious practices that I used to perform, which connected me to the attackers.</p><p dir="ltr">I quit my job in 2009 to continue my studies. I left Egypt, carrying with me a heavy emotional burden because of my work. I loathed the same old repeated sectarian attacks, and I hated how they always ended the same way, with no justice given to the victims. As a result, I started drifting away from all of the religious practices that I used to perform, which connected me to the attackers. I started to lose connection to my religious feelings. I grew weary of the calls and interviews describing the sabotage and burning of churches, and the expulsion of Baha’is from their village. </p><p dir="ltr">Nonetheless, I returned to Egypt after the revolution, and worked at <a href="http://nazra.org/terms/whrd" target="_blank">Nazra for Feminist Studies</a>, where I started the first women human rights defense program in the MENA region. I felt revived and I remember the passion I—along with the entire civil community in Egypt—had when starting on a new file. I shared many moments of joy, hope, and pain with a team with whom I was honored to work. </p> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Begins--> <div style="color: #999999; font-size: 11px; line-height: normal; font-style: italic; text-align: right;"> <img width="444" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/SallemJune.jpg" style="max-width: 100%; background-color: #ffffff; padding: 7px; border: 1px solid #999999;" /> <br />Flickr/Gigi Ibrahim (Some rights reserved) </div> <p style="color: #666666; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;">"I returned to Egypt after the revolution, and worked at Nazra for Feminist Studies, where I started the first women human rights defense program in the MENA region." </p> <hr style="color: #d2d3d5; background-color: #d2d3d5; height: 1px; width: 85%; border: none; text-align: center; margin: 0 auto;" /> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Ends--> <p dir="ltr">However, the work soon started to take on another direction, driven by feelings of guilt and insufficient working hours to deal with the violations human rights defenders face. The privileges we carried turned into a guilt that should be atoned by continuing to work, and because of pressure from management, we dismissed any aspect of personal life, be it health or giving adequate time and efforts to family and friends. Overworked and overwhelmed, I soon lost my ability and appetite to work in such a poisonous atmosphere, and I decided to quit. I still feel that I failed the team I worked with, on a professional and personal level. I neither had enough tools nor adequate knowledge to enable us to overcome the testimonies we heard, and to protect ourselves from their influence on our mental state and personal lives. My only consolation is I did not continue in this harmful loop, which only keep escalating and accumulating. I left and many others left after me due to the same issues. </p><p dir="ltr">After that, I tried a new coping method: keeping a clear and wide distance from directly meeting &nbsp;the victims and survivors of human rights violations. But this also affected my work. I returned to EIPR, focusing on the “Transitional Justice” file. I thought that by working on this file, I would not have to listen to people talking about their painful experiences. But summer 2013 with its waves of <a href="https://eipr.org/publications/اسابيع-القتل" target="_blank">state violence and sectarian attacks</a> did not give much leeway to anyone. </p><p dir="ltr">Initially I refused to accept what was happening—denial and detachment are coping mechanisms, after all. I was in so much denial that I attended a wedding party to pretend that I was not living through such deadly events. Now I cannot really decide whether the documentation I did was adequate or whether my fear of the pain of what I would hear affected the quality of my work. I could not bring myself to go to the streets, with my colleagues, to document the violent events in real time. I was satisfied with the information I got through phone calls. This attitude was not derived from laziness, or an inability to reach people and meet with or interview them, but it came from fear of empathizing too much, and feeling too much pain, as had happened before. </p><p dir="ltr">I envy those who are in the “human rights” field and look at it strictly as a career, or subject of study and academic work. I am quite certain that this kind of person suffers less, and would have a better ability to endure and continue in this line of work. As for me, I cannot detach myself from my work, emotionally and psychologically. Perhaps that is why I still try to distance myself from documenting the testimonies of victims and survivors. </p><p dir="ltr">A few months ago, I met one of my colleagues to discuss our joint work, but ultimately we could not do it because of the effect of her work and her need to recover from it. This was the other end of the spectrum: being too traumatized to do good work. Where is the middle ground?</p><p>I do not have answers yet, but I do have my own share of bad experiences that allow me to ask questions. I know that <a href="http://www.josaab.org/Arabic/HospicesServices.asp?smu=d11&amp;mmu=m4" target="_blank">others are also seeking answers</a>, in the hope that we can find a safe space to work without losing our human connection with what we do.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image 0'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title="imgupl_floating_none"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_large/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" alt="" title="imgupl_floating_none" width="300" height="115" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload 0 imagecache imagecache-article_large" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'></span></span></p> <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0; URL=' http://www.openglobalrights.org/no-one-warned-me-trade-off-between-self-care-and-effective-activism/'" /><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="http://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/OpenGlobalRights-highlight4English.png" alt="" width="140" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-sidebox"> <div class="field-label"> Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/mental-health-and-well-being-in-human-rights" target="_blank"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/Mental-health_inset_1.png" border="0" alt="“Data" width="140" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/deepa-ranganathan-mar-d-az-ezquerro/making-our-movements-sustainable-practicing-holistic-security-ev">Making our movements sustainable: practicing holistic security every day</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/shena-cavallo-jocelyn-berger-michelle-truong/revolutions-are-built-on-hope-role-of-">Revolutions are built on hope: the role of funders in collective self-care</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/meerim-ilyas-tatiana-cordero-vel-squez/collective-care-in-human-rights-funding-poli">Collective care in human rights funding: a political stand</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/kristi-pinderi/when-advocacy-work-builds-resilience-everyone-benefits">When advocacy work builds resilience, everyone benefits</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/zelalem-kibret/ready-for-anything-how-preparation-can-improve-trauma-recovery">Ready for anything: how preparation can improve trauma recovery</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/holly-davis-magda-adamowicz/security-and-well-being-two-sides-of-same-coin">Security and well-being: two sides of the same coin</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/alexandra-zetes/turning-weakness-into-strength-lessons-as-new-advocate">Turning weakness into strength: lessons as a new advocate</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/sam-dubberley/when-watching-violence-is-your-job-workers-on-digital-frontline">When watching violence is your job: workers on the digital frontline</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights Yara Sallam Middle East & North Africa Mental Health and Well-being in Human Rights Tue, 20 Jun 2017 08:30:00 +0000 Yara Sallam 111748 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Making our movements sustainable: practicing holistic security every day https://www.opendemocracy.net/deepa-ranganathan-mar-d-az-ezquerro/making-our-movements-sustainable-practicing-holistic-security-ev <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/Screen Shot 2017-06-14 at 10.13.53 PM.png" alt="" width="140" /></p><p dir="ltr">What does holistic security and collective self-care in human rights work look like on a day-to-day basis? A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/mental-health-and-well-being-in-human-rights" target="_blank">mental health and human rights</a>. <em><strong><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/mar-d-az-ezquerro-deepa-ranganathan" target="_blank">العربية</a>. <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/mar-d-az-ezquerro-deepa-ranganathan/rendre-nos-mouvements-durables-pratiquer-la-s-c" target="_blank">Français</a>. <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/mar-d-az-ezquerro-deepa-ranganathan/haciendo-sostenibles-nuestros-movimientos-pract" target="_blank">Español</a>.</strong></em></p> </div> </div> </div> <p dir="ltr">As Women Human Rights Defenders (WHRD) operating from different cultures, contexts and political environments, our strategies are also diverse and constantly in flux. Our work can be dangerous, difficult and subject to punitive action, simply due to the fact that we exist or organize as a young human rights group or collective. Some of us are members of LGBTQI* groups who can never openly admit these identities. Some of us are lawyers who listen to cases of human rights violations that require an empathetic ear and complete confidentiality. Some of us are resource mobilizers who need to navigate the politics of money. Some of us are artists writing songs, painting walls, performing poetries and singing lyrics that challenge oppressive structures.</p><p class="mag-quote-center" dir="ltr">In the fight to defend human rights and make sure justice is accessible and attainable to everyone, we risk our physical and psychological well-being. </p><p dir="ltr">In the fight to defend human rights and make sure justice is accessible and attainable to everyone, we risk our physical and psychological well-being. Indeed, physical attacks on &nbsp;WHRDs are not a new phenomenon and have increased in recent years, according to the 2012<a href="http://defendingwomen-defendingrights.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/WHRD_IC_Global-Report_2012.pdf" target="_blank"> Global Report on the Situation of WHRDs</a>. And, according to the recently published research, <a href="http://youngfeministfund.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/frida-awid_young_feminist_organizing_research.pdf" target="_blank">‘Brave, Creative, Resilient: The Global State of Young Feminist Organizing’</a>, produced jointly by AWID's Young Feminist Program and FRIDA, 44% of young feminists said they felt threatened or unsafe because of the work they do. Fifty-four per cent of them have identified extremist or fundamentalist religious groups as the biggest threat to their everyday activism. The rise of fundamentalism, militarism, democracy crises, neoliberalism and globalization overlap the contexts where WHRDs work. This has resulted in an alarming increase of attacks and threats against us. There are thousands of young feminist activists who are at serious risk or have been subjected to different forms of physical, psychological and online violence. &nbsp;</p> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Begins--> <div style="color: #999999; font-size: 11px; line-height: normal; font-style: italic; text-align: right;"> <img style="max-width: 100%; background-color: #ffffff; padding: 7px; border: 1px solid #999999;" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/Screen Shot 2017-06-14 at 8.17.11 PM.png" width="444" /> <br />Photo credit: Deepa Ranganathan </div> <p style="color: #666666; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;">In 2016 at the 13th AWID Forum held in Bahia, Brazil, a canvas was dedicated to WHRDs who lost their lives. Participants signed the wall with parting messages as a tribute. </p> <hr style="color: #d2d3d5; background-color: #d2d3d5; height: 1px; width: 85%; border: none; text-align: center; margin: 0 auto;" /> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Ends--> <p dir="ltr">In this volatile and challenging global context, holistic security is a political strategy that contributes to the preservation and sustainability of feminist movements. To understand holistic security, one needs to be mindful of the social, political, economic, environmental and other systemic factors that provoke and reproduce inequality, violence and patriarchal attitudes and practices. Holistic security recognizes the specific gendered nature of violence, which can manifest itself on the physical, emotional and psychological level, takes into account the way public and private spheres interact with each other and offers a complete self care solution in continuum that serves to counter that. It also contextualises our needs, privileges and risks.</p><p dir="ltr">Self-care is a security mechanism that can help WHRDs cope with physical and digital risks and prevent burnout and vulnerabilities at an early stage of our roles as activists. At its core, self-care challenges the patriarchal vision of women as carers of the family and community, at the cost of undermining our own sanity and health. Often, self-care is only related to the individual level. But it cannot be separated from the collective well-being within our organizations, shared efforts, and movements. Collective self-care, as an essential part of integrated security, is a feminist act of resistance and resilience that contributes to transformative social change and strengthens the sustainability of our work.</p> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Begins--> <div style="color: #999999; font-size: 11px; line-height: normal; font-style: italic; text-align: right;"> <img style="max-width: 100%; background-color: #ffffff; padding: 7px; border: 1px solid #999999;" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/Picture2.png" width="444" /> <br />Words by Maryam Alkhawaja, Urgent Action Fund's board member. Art by @mosaiceye. Original Insta post by @urgentactionfund. </div> <p style="color: #666666; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;">Urgent Action Fund recently launched an Instagram feed dedicated entirely to posting about self-care and well-being. "As a human rights defender, you are not just putting yourself at risk. You put everyone you love at risk. Your family, your relatives, your friends, your colleagues." </p> <hr style="color: #d2d3d5; background-color: #d2d3d5; height: 1px; width: 85%; border: none; text-align: center; margin: 0 auto;" /> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Ends--> <p dir="ltr">At FRIDA, some of the young feminist groups that form a part of our community often include self-care as part of their work strategy. As many of them work on eradicating different forms of violence, it is necessary to take frequent breaks from all intense workshops and sessions. Often, at global and regional gatherings that we organize with our grantee partners, staff and advisors, we start with positive affirmations for each other, hold hands, offer hugs, and do rituals and breathing exercises together. These tools are an essential part of our convening/meeting methodology. In addition, we always carve out safe spaces during meetings for self-care sessions, such as stress management, feminist self-defense, eating, dancing, and practising collective yoga. Resorting to breaks and taking concrete steps to care for each other becomes especially important for us, as a global organization that only gathers everyone together in the same space about twice a year.</p><p dir="ltr">At an organizational level, we regularly build and reconstruct our politics and collective self-care practices. We prioritize holistic security in our internal policies and translate it into actions. &nbsp;<a href="http://youngfeministfund.org/2016/09/fridas-working-style-and-principles/" target="_blank">As a team working from different time zones</a>, we always try to find online and in-person spaces that are safe and dedicated to team building and collective reflections. &nbsp;Our weekly team meetings begin with casual check-ins talking about everything except work, before jumping into any strategizing or planning: what did we cook, what shoes are we wearing, what song are we humming today. To verbalise such seemingly insignificant things has become a welcome breather and has had a huge impact on our mental well-being. It makes us feel closer to each other, despite being miles apart and playing diverse roles. In fact, last year, our team co-wrote <a href="http://youngfeministfund.org/2016/10/practising-individual-and-collective-self-care-at-frida/" target="_blank">this blog post</a> about some of our own practices for individual and collective self care. It was the first collaborative piece for our team and it was fitting that it was about self care and well-being.</p><p dir="ltr">&nbsp;Fighting for human rights is an everyday task for many of us and our interaction happens both on the field and off it. Either way, it could be an isolating and thankless experience. In such situations, to know that your team has got your back matters a great deal. To stay motivated every single day to continue our fight can sometimes be a daunting task. That is why we must often seek support and solidarity from our peers and other fellow feminists around us, to make sure we are never isolated. To take care of our mental well-being is necessary to be able to contribute to the movement fully.</p><p dir="ltr">As WHRDs, we must lead the way in ensuring holistic security as part of our work. As young feminist leaders, we must resist falling into the trap of replicating the systems we challenge in organizations and movements. This can lead to exhaustion of members, unequal power dynamics, eventually contributing to an unbalanced and unhealthy work environment. It is important to incorporate comprehensive self-care policies in our organizations, and ensure resources are available for us to be able to promote this culture of feminist collective well-being in our movements. &nbsp;</p><p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image 0'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title="imgupl_floating_none"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_large/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" alt="" title="imgupl_floating_none" width="300" height="115" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload 0 imagecache imagecache-article_large" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'></span></span></p> <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0; URL=' http://www.openglobalrights.org/making-our-movements-sustainable-practicing-holistic-security-ev/'" /><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="http://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/OpenGlobalRights-highlight4English.png" alt="" width="140" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-sidebox"> <div class="field-label"> Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/mental-health-and-well-being-in-human-rights" target="_blank"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/Mental-health_inset_1.png" border="0" alt="“Data" width="140" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/shena-cavallo-jocelyn-berger-michelle-truong/revolutions-are-built-on-hope-role-of-">Revolutions are built on hope: the role of funders in collective self-care</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/meerim-ilyas-tatiana-cordero-vel-squez/collective-care-in-human-rights-funding-poli">Collective care in human rights funding: a political stand</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/kristi-pinderi/when-advocacy-work-builds-resilience-everyone-benefits">When advocacy work builds resilience, everyone benefits</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/zelalem-kibret/ready-for-anything-how-preparation-can-improve-trauma-recovery">Ready for anything: how preparation can improve trauma recovery</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/holly-davis-magda-adamowicz/security-and-well-being-two-sides-of-same-coin">Security and well-being: two sides of the same coin</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/alexandra-zetes/turning-weakness-into-strength-lessons-as-new-advocate">Turning weakness into strength: lessons as a new advocate</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/sam-dubberley/when-watching-violence-is-your-job-workers-on-digital-frontline">When watching violence is your job: workers on the digital frontline</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights María Díaz Ezquerro Deepa Ranganathan Global Mental Health and Well-being in Human Rights Thu, 15 Jun 2017 08:30:00 +0000 Deepa Ranganathan and María Díaz Ezquerro 111675 at https://www.opendemocracy.net A levy in the African Union could be a step towards independence https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/amandine-rushenguziminega/levy-in-african-union-could-be-step-towards-independence <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/RushenguziminegaJune.jpg" alt="" width="140" /></p><p dir="ltr">A new levy in the African Union could lead to more financial independence—but who is funding human rights? A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/funding-for-human-rights" target="_blank">funding for human rights.</a>&nbsp;<strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/amandine-rushenguziminega/au-sein-de-l-union-africaine-une-taxe-pourrait-marquer-un" target="_blank">Français</a></em></strong>.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p dir="ltr">Many scholars and critics have commented on the African Union’s (AU) financial dependence on external partners. As <a target="_blank" href="https://www.pambazuka.org/governance/au%E2%80%99s-dependency-donors-big-shame">Oyoo Sungu</a> said: “The AU has the bark of a bulldog, and the bite of a poodle. This is because it’s yet to become independent financially—and ultimately, politically.” Who really owns the AU agenda and, more importantly, its human rights institutions, such as the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights (<a target="_blank" href="http://www.achpr.org/">ACHPR</a>), the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights (<a target="_blank" href="http://en.african-court.org/">AfCHPR</a>), and the African Committee of Experts on the Rights and Welfare of the Child (<a target="_blank" href="http://www.acerwc.org/">ACERWC</a>)?<br class="kix-line-break" /></p><p dir="ltr">While human rights institutions receive operational money from the AU, they receive very little funding for their programs. For example, for the <a target="_blank" href="https://au.int/web/sites/default/files/decisions/9664-assembly_au_dec_569_-_587_xxiv_e.pdf">2016 budget</a> for the AfCHPR, the operating budget was financed by Member States while the program budget was 100% funded by donor partners.</p><p dir="ltr">To combat this issue, in 2011 former Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo proposed to <a target="_blank" href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/selemani-kinyunyu/tax-on-texting-getting-creative-with-funding-human-rights-in-afri">raise money through taxes</a> on airline tickets, text messages and hotel stays. However, countries whose main income derived from tourism <a target="_blank" href="http://www.newzimbabwe.com/news-20271-Tax+to+fund+African+Union+on+the+cards/news.aspx">criticized</a> the proposal for focusing on the tourism sector while ignoring the oil and mineral sectors. Since then, the AU has made several decisions to move closer to financial independence. For example, during the January 2015 Heads of State and Government Summit, leaders made decisions on the <a target="_blank" href="https://au.int/web/sites/default/files/decisions/9665-assembly_au_dec_546_-_568_xxiv_e.pdf">report of alternative sources of financing</a> the African Union and highlighted the need for an appropriate scale of assessment for Member States’ contributions. In the end, the leaders decided that: a) Member States would fund the operational budget at 100%; b) Member States would fund the program budget at 75%;
c) Member States would fund the Peace support the operations budget at 25%.</p><p dir="ltr" class="mag-quote-center">The dependence on external partners—and the failure of states to pay their dues—only reinforces the image of the AU as a weak institution.</p><p dir="ltr">Also, the July 2016 <a target="_blank" href="https://au.int/web/sites/default/files/decisions/31274-assembly_au_dec_605-620_xxvii_e.pdf">Heads of State and Government Summit</a> gave practical decisions on the way forward. They took note of Dr. Donald Kaberuka’s report (former President of the <a target="_blank" href="https://www.afdb.org/en/">African Development Bank [AfDB])</a> and appointed him as High Representative for the <a target="_blank" href="https://au.int/web/en/peace-fund">AU Peace Fund,</a> which is meant to fund mediation and preventive diplomacy, institutional capacity and peace support operations. They also <a target="_blank" href="https://au.int/web/sites/default/files/decisions/31274-assembly_au_dec_605-620_xxvii_e.pdf">entrusted H.E. Paul Kagame</a>, President of the Republic of Rwanda, to prepare a report on the institutional reform of the AU. <a target="_blank" href="http://www.gsdpp.uct.ac.za/sites/default/files/image_tool/images/78/News/FInal%20AU%20Reform%20Combined%20report_28012017.pdf">The report</a>, among other things, reminded African Member States that only 25 out of 54 of them had paid their assessment for the financial year 2016 in full.&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">The dependence on external partners—and the failure of states to pay their dues—only reinforces the image of the AU as a weak institution that doesn’t set its own programmatic agenda. Among other things, Kagame’s report recommends that the current scale of assessment for Member States should be revised based on other criteria such as the ability to pay, solidarity, and equitable burden sharing. But most importantly, he proposed that the penalties for Member States for failure to fulfill their contribution obligations should be revised and tightened.&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">It is not surprising, then, to see <a target="_blank" href="http://allafrica.com/stories/201702220043.html">Rwanda</a> leading the implementation of the new 0.2% levy on imported goods to finance the Union. In February 2017, Members of the Rwandan Parliament approved a Bill, which, if enacted into law, will help the Rwandan Government to raise Rwf 1.5 billion per year to sponsor AU affairs. If the other 54 African Member State do the same, the potential for self-funding is significant.&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">Nonetheless, it is still not completely clear where this 0.2% levy fund will be attributed. The 2016 <a target="_blank" href="https://au.int/web/sites/default/files/pages/31902-file-guidelines20english2028129.pdf">Guidelines</a> explain that the 0.2% will be instituted to finance the 100% Operational budget of the AU, the 75% Program budget, 25% of Peace Support Operations (PSOs) and the Peace Fund. Yet human rights institutions are completely left out of the picture. Although 75% of programs will be covered by the levy, nothing is mentioned about the ACHPR, the AfCHPR or the ACERWC. <a target="_blank" href="https://au.int/web/en/program-budget">The explanation</a> instead highlights the need of funds for political or social emergencies such as Ebola, climate change and migration issues. While those are highly important topics and need specific responses from African Member States, the continental human rights institutions also need to be reinforced. </p> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Begins--> <div style="color: #999999; font-size: 11px; line-height: normal; font-style: italic; text-align: right;"><img width="444" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/RushenguziminegaJune.jpg" style="max-width: 100%; background-color: #ffffff; padding: 7px; border: 1px solid #999999;" /> <br /> Flickr/GovernmentZA (Some Rights Reserved) </div> <p style="color: #666666; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;">During the July 2016 Summit, the leaders declared the next ten years as “the Human and Peoples’ Rights Decade in Africa”. Three AU human rights institutions are developing the African Human Rights Action and Implementation Plan 2017-26. </p> <hr style="color: #d2d3d5; background-color: #d2d3d5; height: 1px; width: 85%; border: none; text-align: center; margin: 0 auto;" /> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Ends--> <p dir="ltr">Most importantly, during the July 2016 Summit, <a target="_blank" href="https://au.int/web/sites/default/files/decisions/31274-assembly_au_dec_605-620_xxvii_e.pdf">the leaders declared</a> the next ten years as “the Human and Peoples’ Rights Decade in Africa”. The three key AU human rights institutions, along with the <a target="_blank" href="http://lawyersofafrica.org/">Pan African Lawyers’ Union (PALU)</a>, are in the process of developing the <a target="_blank" href="http://www.africanhuriplan.org/">African Human Rights Action and Implementation Plan 2017-26</a>. But the question remains, where will the money come from to develop this Action Plan, and how can we be sure that enough funds will be dedicated to its implementation?</p><p dir="ltr">&nbsp;Having the programmatic budget of human rights institutions funded by external partners leads to a crippling lack of flexibility in the AU. The donor-led situation makes it difficult for the AU to own and decide which kind of programs/areas should be prioritized or not, leading to the crucial question of priorities for Africa. While peace and security on the continent is a prerequisite to economic growth and social development, and to the right of African citizens to leave in peace and dignity, we often forget that human rights violations are usually the first step in a chain of events that end up in violence and conflict. Therefore, promoting and protecting human and peoples’ rights is the first step in ensuring democracy, governance and peace and security. Human rights violations can come from different corners, such as corruption, illicit financial flows, trafficking, and money laundering. Investing in human rights is investing in the general economic and social growth of the continent. For example, <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tanaforum.org/y-file-store/Tana_2017/tana_2017_theme_infographics-1.pdf">Africa</a> owns 12% of global oil reserves, 8% of global natural gas, approximately 30% of global mineral reserves and 600 million hectares of uncultivated arable land, which is 60% of the global total. But the continent has weak international negotiating power with external partners and more importantly, weak protection of rights of Africans when being forcibly evicted from lands. Human rights are part of a much bigger picture, and the current situation makes Africa grow at a slower pace than it should be.&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">Although Africa has the most comprehensively developed human rights framework in the world, covering the rights of humans in general but also defining peoples, women, disabled and children’s rights, African Member States are making very little effort to ratify the relevant AU legal instruments and in contributing to the development of human rights on the continent. Words are being spoken but actions are missing. The AU needs to put more focus and funds into financing its human rights institutions, creating both credibility and results.</p><p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image 0'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title="imgupl_floating_none"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_large/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" alt="" title="imgupl_floating_none" width="300" height="115" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload 0 imagecache imagecache-article_large" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'></span></span></p> <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0; URL=' http://www.openglobalrights.org/levy-in-african-union-could-be-step-towards-independence/'" /><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="http://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/OpenGlobalRights-highlight4English.png" alt="" width="140" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-sidebox"> <div class="field-label"> Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="http://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/funding-for-human-rights" target="_blank" onmouseover="document.Imgs.src='http://www.opendemocracy.net/files/Funding_Inset_2.png'" onmouseout="document.Imgs.src='http://www.opendemocracy.net/files/Funding_Inset_1.png'"> <img src="http://www.opendemocracy.net/files/Funding_Inset_1.png" width="140" name="Imgs" border="0" alt="Funding for human rights – Read on" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/amanda-fazano/exploring-new-possibilities-beyond-foreign-funding-in-brazil">Exploring new possibilities beyond foreign funding in Brazil</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/david-crow-jos-kaire-and-james-ron/monetizing-human-rights-brand">Monetizing the human rights “brand”</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/james-ron-david-crow-jos-kaire/ordinary-people-will-pay-for-rights-we-asked-them">Ordinary people will pay for rights. We asked them</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/maina-kiai/from-funding-projects-to-funding-struggles-reimagining-role-of-donors">From funding projects to funding struggles: Reimagining the role of donors</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/lotta-teale/how-to-pay-for-legal-empowerment-alternative-structures-and-sources">How to pay for legal empowerment: alternative structures and sources</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/burkhard-gn-rig/old-world-of-civic-participation-is-being-replaced">The old world of civic participation is being replaced</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/edwin-rekosh/to-preserve-human-rights-organizational-models-must-change">To preserve human rights, organizational models must change</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights Amandine Rushenguziminega Sub-Saharan Africa Middle East & North Africa Funding for Human Rights Wed, 14 Jun 2017 08:30:00 +0000 Amandine Rushenguziminega 111654 at https://www.opendemocracy.net ‘If I lose my freedom’: preemptive resistance to forced confessions in China https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/michael-caster/if-i-lose-my-freedom-preemptive-resistance-to-forced-confessions-in- <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/CasterJune.jpg" alt="" width="140" /></p><p dir="ltr">Human rights defenders in China are increasingly using pre-recorded statements to control narratives to protect themselves against forced confessions. <em><strong><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/michael-caster-0" target="_blank">简体中文.&nbsp;</a></strong></em></p> </div> </div> </div> <p dir="ltr">On May 3, 2017 security forces in Southern China abducted human rights lawyer Chen Jiangang and drove him over 3,000 kilometres back to Beijing. He remained in their custody for over 80 hours, missing the trial of his client, Xie Yang, whose torture he had <a target="_blank" href="https://chinachange.org/2017/01/19/transcript-of-interviews-with-lawyer-xie-yang-1/">exposed</a> in January.</p><p dir="ltr">At his trial, Xie Yang “admitted” to having been brainwashed by foreign agents, and on Hunan state TV repeated that he had sensationalised cases and denied having been tortured. But Xie Yang had anticipated this forced confession.</p><p class="mag-quote-center" dir="ltr">“If, one day in the future, I do confess—whether in writing or on camera or on tape—that will not be the true expression of my own mind."</p><p dir="ltr">Xie, detained in July 2015, wrote in a <a target="_blank" href="https://chinachange.org/2017/03/07/xie-yangs-handwritten-statement-on-january-13-2017/">January 2017 affidavit</a>: “If, one day in the future, I do confess—whether in writing or on camera or on tape—that will not be the true expression of my own mind. It may be because I've been subjected to prolonged torture, or because I've been offered the chance to be released on bail…”. Soon after his trial, Xie was released on bail, but he <a target="_blank" href="https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/news/2017/05/china-human-rights-lawyer-released-on-bail-amid-relentless-crackdown/">remains under constant surveillance</a>. &nbsp;Speaking to Radio Free Asia, his wife, Chen Guiqiu, who escaped to the United States with their two daughters, <a target="_blank" href="https://chinachange.org/2017/03/07/xie-yangs-handwritten-statement-on-january-13-2017/">put it bluntly</a>, “They are pretending to set him free. It's a joke; I want to make that very clear. He must be under unimaginable pressure.”</p> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Begins--> <div style="color: #999999; font-size: 11px; line-height: normal; font-style: italic; text-align: right;"> <img style="max-width: 100%; background-color: #ffffff; padding: 7px; border: 1px solid #999999;" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/CasterJune.jpg" width="444" /> <br />By Chris McKenna (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons (Some rights reserved) </div> <p style="color: #666666; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;">In his televised “confession,” Gui, a Swedish citizen, asked not to receive diplomatic assistance and renounced his Swedish citizenship. </p> <hr style="color: #d2d3d5; background-color: #d2d3d5; height: 1px; width: 85%; border: none; text-align: center; margin: 0 auto;" /> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Ends--> <p dir="ltr">It seems that the police abducted Chen Jiangang to ensure his silence during Xie’s trial, but as soon as he was taken, reasonable fears circulated that he would be “disappeared”. Like Xie, Chen’s understanding of the cruelty of China’s police state bred prescience. Three months earlier he had recorded a video statement to be released if he lost freedom. It was published on the <a target="_blank" href="https://chinachange.org/2017/05/03/breaking-lawyer-chen-jiangang-with-family-and-two-friends-seized-by-armed-police-in-yunnan/">China Change website</a> soon after he was taken.</p><p dir="ltr">In the sombre five-minute video, Chen states that he has committed no crimes and would not accuse others. He states that any spoken, written, or video confession would only have been made under duress, threat or torture. He also asks for forgiveness if in the future he ends up on television accusing others or revealing names. Emotionally, he ends with, “If I am seized, dear kids, your father loves you. If I lose my freedom, release this video.”</p><p dir="ltr">While such pre-recorded statements are becoming more common for human rights defenders in China, others can learn from those like Chen Jiangang that protection also involves controlling narratives. Such statements are an important innovation in protection tactics in response to China’s increasing use of disappearances and forced confessions.</p><p dir="ltr">Forced confessions clearly violate Chinese law and international norms. For those awaiting trial, broadcasting forced confessions violates their right to a fair trial. Many forced confessions come following hundreds of days in pre-trial detention, which itself should be the exception, never the rule, and only for the shortest time necessary. The risk of torture is high in a criminal justice system reliant on confessions, while the pursuit of forced confessions drastically increases the risk. Victims of enforced disappearance and secret detention are especially vulnerable to torture.</p><p dir="ltr">Emblematic is the case of my friend and former colleague, lawyer <a target="_blank" href="https://www.hongkongfp.com/2016/12/09/times-china-must-release-imprisoned-lawyer-wang-quanzhang/">Wang Quanzhang</a>, whose exact fate and whereabouts have not been verified since police abducted him in August 2015. In January 2017, it was revealed that he had been tortured. Likely, Wang’s ongoing abuse is due to his refusal to perform a forced confession.</p><p dir="ltr">Following the “<a target="_blank" href="https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/campaigns/2016/07/one-year-since-chinas-crackdown-on-human-rights-lawyers/">709 Crackdown</a>”—a sweep by Chinese authorities that began on July 9, 2015 and resulted in nearly 300 lawyers and activists being questioned, detained or charged—several prominent human rights lawyers have been forced to deliver televised confessions. These include <a target="_blank" href="http://www.smh.com.au/world/a-confession-few-believe-chinese-rights-lawyer-wang-yus-is-freed-20160801-gqipos.html">Wang Yu</a>, parts of whose “confession” were so flagrantly similar to China’s then recent denouncement of a Hague Tribunal decision on the South China Sea that nobody questioned who had designed her “confession.” It also includes Zhang Kai, who later disappeared a second time after he publicly recanted his initial “confession.” A couple of months before Zhang’s disappearance, in June 2016, Hong Kong bookseller Lam Wing Kee also revealed that he and his colleagues at Mighty Current publishing had been forced into confessing, including <a target="_blank" href="https://www.hongkongfp.com/2016/10/17/the-last-missing-bookseller-one-year-on-the-anniversary-of-gui-minhais-abduction-demands-action/">Gui Minhai</a>, a Swedish citizen, who remains incommunicado.</p><p dir="ltr">In his televised “confession,” Gui asked not to receive diplomatic assistance and renounced his Swedish citizenship. This was rightly dismissed as arising from coercion but what if Gui, like Chen Jiangang, had left a video preemptively dismissing such absurdity? For many who disappear into China’s Orwellian darkness, and re-emerge to “confess”, their last credible speech act may be what they leave with others, which in turn may offer some protection.</p><p dir="ltr">Contentious politics scholar <a target="_blank" href="https://books.google.ca/books/about/Comparative_Perspectives_on_Social_Movem.html?id=8UamWMisjtkC">Doug McAdam</a>, and others, have identified the dramatisation of glaring state contradictions as creating opportunity for resistance. In terms of practical protection for rights defenders in hostile environments such as China, if preventive measures against certain forms of repression are increasingly adopted, the authorities are more likely to abandon them, ultimately protecting human rights defenders from being subjected to them in the first place</p><p dir="ltr">Once taken, it is often too late to ask that person what assistance they want. Even if allowed to meet a lawyer, pressure often limits what one is able to say. This is why recording in advance is crucial. Gui Minhai, for example, could have expressed that he had already given up Chinese citizenship and would never renounce Swedish citizenship. For others it could be stating that they would never accept a state appointed lawyer. Some might want to issue a statement about family members, that except if subjected to threat or torture they would never deny access to the family bank account, a measure the state has used to target family members’ economic livelihood.</p><p dir="ltr">Video is more powerful than written statements, and rights defenders at risk of disappearance or forced confession should record their statements—after conducting a thorough threat assessment—rather than just writing them down.</p><p dir="ltr">It is, of course, a damning indictment of China’s war on the rule of law that human rights defenders need to think of preemptively recording their own defence against baseless charges and forced confessions. But if more human rights defenders did so then the power of these repressive measures could ultimately be lost through the unmasking of contradictions.&nbsp;</p><p>This piece was adapted from an article originally published <a target="_blank" href="https://www.hongkongfp.com/2017/05/16/i-lose-freedom-chinas-human-rights-defenders-preemptively-resisting-forced-confessions/">here</a> on the Hong Kong Free Press.</p><p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image 0'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title="imgupl_floating_none"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_large/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" alt="" title="imgupl_floating_none" width="300" height="115" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload 0 imagecache imagecache-article_large" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'></span></span></p> <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0; URL=' http://www.openglobalrights.org/if-i-lose-my-freedom-preemptive-resistance-to-forced-confessions-in-/'" /><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="http://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/OpenGlobalRights-highlight4English.png" alt="" width="140" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-sidebox"> <div class="field-label"> Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href=" https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights-openpage"><img width="140" src=" https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/openPagesidebox.png " /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/aseem-prakash-nives-dol-ak/international-organizations-and-crisis-of-legitimacy">International organizations and the crisis of legitimacy</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/yonatan-lupu/following-orders-how-expectations-might-reduce-human-rights-abuses">Following orders: how expectations might reduce human rights abuses</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/robert-precht/engagement-versus-endorsement-western-universities-in-china">Engagement versus endorsement: Western universities in China</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/jessica-m-wyndham-margaret-weigers-vitullo/why-right-to-science-matters-for-everyone">Why the right to science matters for everyone</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/alicia-ely-yamin/speaking-truth-to-power-call-for-praxis-in-human-rights">“Speaking truth to power:” a call for praxis in human rights</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/douglas-mathew-mawadri/fighting-stigma-protecting-mental-health-of-african-rights-a">Fighting stigma: protecting the mental health of African rights advocates</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/meg-satterthwaite/evidence-of-trauma-impact-of-human-rights-work-on-advocates">Evidence of trauma: the impact of human rights work on advocates</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights openGlobalRights-openpage Michael Caster East and South-East Asia Tue, 13 Jun 2017 08:30:00 +0000 Michael Caster 111611 at https://www.opendemocracy.net International organizations and the crisis of legitimacy https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/aseem-prakash-nives-dol-ak/international-organizations-and-crisis-of-legitimacy <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/Dolsak and PrakashJune.jpg" alt="" width="140" /></p><p dir="ltr"> When international organizations face legitimacy problems, they need to address governance issues, conflicts of interest, and poor leadership.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p dir="ltr">In one of Donald Trump’s <a target="_blank" href="https://twitter.com/realdonaldtrump/status/813500123053490176?lang=en">numerous tweets</a>, he wrote, “The United Nations has such great potential but right now it is just a club for people to get together, talk and have a good time. So sad!” While perhaps an oversimplification—and insulting to the many people who work there—Trump’s reference to the ineffectiveness of the UN echoed a frequent accusation that the organization has become a talk-prone organization that accomplishes little. In addition, just this week, <a target="_blank" href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/us-warns-it-may-pull-out-of-un-human-rights-body-over-abuses-treatment-of-israel/2017/06/06/3a42b78e-4a9b-11e7-9669-250d0b15f83b_story.html?utm_term=.9468ced744b8&amp;wpisrc=nl_most&amp;wpmm=1">the Trump administration announced</a> that it may pull out of the UN Human Rights Council, accusing the UN body of shielding regimes that it should be condemning.</p><p dir="ltr" class="mag-quote-center">There are three additional issues that international organizations confront if they want to enhance legitimacy and trust: governance issues, conflicts of interest and poor leadership.</p><div>There is considerable scholarship examining the effectiveness of international organizations across issue areas including <a target="_blank" href="file:///C:\Users\Alexander%20Prakash\Downloads\Hafner-Burton,%20E.%20M.%20(2008).%20Sticks%20and%20stones:%20Naming%20and%20shaming%20the%20human%20rights%20enforcement%20problem.%20International%20Organization,%2062(04),%20689-716">human rights</a>, <a target="_blank" href="file:///C:\Users\Alexander%20Prakash\Downloads\Rose,%20Andrew%20K.%20%22Do%20we%20really%20know%20that%20the%20WTO%20increases%20trade%3f.%22%20The%20American%20Economic%20Review%2094.1%20(2004):%2098-114">trade</a>, <a target="_blank" href="https://www.routledge.com/International-Organizations-in-Global-Environmental-Governance/Biermann-Siebenhuner-Schreyogg/p/book/9780415469258">environmental protection</a>, and <a target="_blank" href="http://heinonline.org/HOL/LandingPage?handle=hein.journals/yhurdvl7&amp;div=4&amp;id=&amp;page=">labor rights</a>—some positive, and some not. There are several reasons why such organizations are sometimes not perceived as functioning effectively and efficiently. <a target="_blank" href="https://www.cambridge.org/core/services/aop-cambridge-core/content/view/S002081839944086X">Scholars</a> note that these organizations get afflicted by specific pathologies that make them bureaucratic and unresponsive to the needs of their stakeholders. Others find that this bureaucratic model fosters <a target="_blank" href="file:///C:\Users\Alexander%20Prakash\Downloads\Dahl,%20Robert%20A.%20%22Can%20International%20Organizations%20be%20Democratic%3f%20A%20Skeptic’s%20View.%22%20The%20Cosmopolitanism%20Reader%20(2010):%20423">democracy deficits</a>. &nbsp;The <a target="_blank" href="file:///C:\Users\Alexander%20Prakash\Downloads\Zürn,%20Michael.%20%22Democratic%20governance%20beyond%20the%20nation-state:%20The%20EU%20and%20other%20international%20institutions.%22%20European%20Journal%20of%20International%20Relations%206.2%20(2000):%20183-221">European Union</a>, in particular, has been subjected to this criticism because of the relatively <a target="_blank" href="http://limudbchevruta.wiki.huji.ac.il/images/Rohrschneider_AJPS_(HLM_-_applied).pdf">weak role of the</a> European Parliament, the only body with the EU system that is directly elected by the people, and the power vested in the <a target="_blank" href="http://homes.ieu.edu.tr/aburgin/IREU%20426%20Governance%20of%20the%20EU/Follesdal_Hix_Why%20there%20is%20a%20democratic%20deficit_S2_Spring2010.pdf">European Commission</a>, an unelected bureaucracy, to initiate legislations</div><p dir="ltr">But there are three additional issues that international organizations confront if they want to enhance legitimacy and trust: governance issues, conflicts of interest and poor leadership.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Governance and Oversight failures</strong></p><p dir="ltr">Multilateral organizations are often accused of being poorly managed, and spending far too much on overhead costs, instead of on specific initiatives that solve problems. &nbsp;For example, a <a target="_blank" href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/whos-annual-travel-budget-200-million/2017/05/21/342f0a62-3e7c-11e7-adba-394ee67a7582_story.html?utm_term=.06ee4c370681">recent exposé</a> suggests that the WHO spends about $200 million on travel. Compare this to money it spent of specific programs in 2015: $71 million to AIDS and hepatitis and $61 million to malaria and $59 million to tuberculosis.</p><p dir="ltr">The same report criticizes the WHO’s director-general, Dr. Margaret Chan, for traveling overseas in first class. In addition, during her travel to Guinea to celebrate the world’s first Ebola vaccine, she stayed in a hotel suite with an advertised price of $1,008 per night (this is twice the per capita income of Guinea, which stands at about $532).</p><p dir="ltr">Apart from overhead costs and wastage, these sorts of expenditures signal that leaders of these organizations are divorced from the realities that ordinary people face and do not use organizational resources to serve the organizational mission. This is a critical issue because some academics and policymakers portray international organizations as pillars of the emerging “<a target="_blank" href="http://www.ir.rochelleterman.com/sites/default/files/meyerbolietal1997.pdf">world society</a>.” For them, these organizations transmit global norms that support human rights, environmental protection, and so on. Some go even further by claiming that international organizations serve as “<a target="_blank" href="https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/5f73/f738c870e29cb2c376150196aac2ad18b840.pdf">teachers</a>” for national governments. Hence, even when a <a target="_blank" href="https://www.globalpolicy.org/un-finance/48642-us-ignored-un-aid-agencys-fraud-and-mismangement-.html">handful of these organizations</a> are faced of accusations of <a target="_blank" href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/dec/22/thousands-of-refugees-left-in-cold-as-un-and-eu-accused-of-mismanagement">mismanagement</a> and <a target="_blank" href="http://www.foxnews.com/world/2015/05/28/world-food-program-badly-mismanaged-special-donor-trust-funds-auditors-say.html">hypocrisy</a>, it potentially creates negative <a target="_blank" href="http://www.reuters.com/article/us-un-mismanagement-idUSKCN0WK2VV">reputational spillovers</a> for all. This undermines the legitimacy of such organizations, raises questions about their abilities and motivations to help solve global problems, and creates an impression that these organizations serve as clubs of the well connected.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Conflict of Interest</strong></p><p dir="ltr">The Trump administration is often criticized for packing regulatory agencies with industry lobbyists. The logic underlying this criticism is that some actors, by virtue of their background or past experience, do not have the credibility or incentives to effectively perform regulatory roles. With such actors in leadership positions, the legitimacy of the organization to pursue its goals probably is undermined. International organizations can also suffer from these issues.</p><p dir="ltr">Of course, an obvious recent case is the WHO’s decision to declare H1N1 as a pandemic. Reports suggest that experts who advised the WHO to declare H1N1 a global pandemic had significant <a target="_blank" href="http://www.bmj.com/content/340/bmj.c2912">conflicts of interest</a>, namely that they had close financial ties with pharmaceutical companies that manufactured the H1N1 vaccines.</p><p dir="ltr">However, there seems to <a target="_blank" href="https://www.commentarymagazine.com/articles/how-corrupt-is-the-united-nations/">be a history, at least in UN, to these sorts of episodes involving allegations of corrupt practices</a>, such as the Oil-for-Food relief program in Iraq (in the <a target="_blank" href="https://www.cfr.org/backgrounder/impact-un-oil-food-scandal">Volcker Report</a>), the misappropriation of UN funds earmarked for tsunami relief in Indonesia, and the corrupt practices of UN Secretary General Kofi Annan’s son Kojo, who allegedly secured financial rewards from UN contractors.</p> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Begins--> <div style="color: #999999; font-size: 11px; line-height: normal; font-style: italic; text-align: right;"> <img width="444" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/Dolsak and PrakashJune.jpg" style="max-width: 100%; background-color: #ffffff; padding: 7px; border: 1px solid #999999;" /> <br />Flickr/Isriya Paireepairit (Some rights reserved) </div> <p style="color: #666666; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;">Even when a handful of these organizations are faced of accusations of mismanagement and hypocrisy, it potentially creates negative reputational spillovers for all.</p> <hr style="color: #d2d3d5; background-color: #d2d3d5; height: 1px; width: 85%; border: none; text-align: center; margin: 0 auto;" /> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Ends--> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Poor Leadership </strong></p><p dir="ltr">But there is a deeper problem, not necessarily related to issues of bureaucratic incompetence. This pertains to the questionable credentials of actors that are elected to lead these organizations. Efforts to recruit organizational leaders through a democratic process can lead to the election of highly problematic individuals. While these problems are often discussed in the context of domestic politics, it seems international organizations are not immune from it.</p><p dir="ltr">Consider the recent <a target="_blank" href="http://canadafreepress.com/article/u.n.-elects-genocidal-sudan-vice-chair-of-committee-on-ngos">election of Sudan</a> as Vice-Chair of the UN Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations, a standing committee of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) that accredits and oversees human rights NGOs to the UN. Yet Sudan has a <a target="_blank" href="https://www.hrw.org/world-report/2017/country-chapters/sudan">terrible human rights record</a>: the <a target="_blank" href="https://borgenproject.org/human-rights-violations/">Borgen Project</a> ranks it among the five worst countries in this regard. <a target="_blank" href="https://freedomhouse.org/report/freedom-world/2015/sudan">Freedom House</a> gives it a score of 7 (0=best, 7=worst) on both Freedom rating, Political Rights, and Civil Liberties. Additionally, Sudan's president, Omar Hassan al-Bashir, has been indicted for human rights abuses by the International Criminal Court.</p><p dir="ltr">There are other instances where countries with problematic track records on specific issues are elected to important roles in a UN forum that oversees these issues. Saudi Arabia, for example, widely known for government sanctioned gender inequality, was appointed to the <a target="_blank" href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2017/05/03/saudi-arabia-where-women-arent-allowed-to-drive-was-just-elected-to-the-u-n-womens-rights-commission/?utm_term=.74ab83586523">UN Commission on the Status of Women,</a> a body whose mission is to promote gender equality and empower women. With Sudan playing an important role in a UN human rights forum and Saudi Arabia in a UN gender rights forum, the legitimacy, and arguably the effectiveness, of the UN to act on these issues is undermined. These examples also damage the credibility of multilateral organizations during a time when the world arguably needs to strengthen such forums for multilateral action.</p><p dir="ltr">The problems facing the world are becoming more complex, and require cooperative solutions. If international organizations are to serve as effective instruments of global governance, they will need to be better managed and become more accountable. At the same time, they will need to adopt rules which lead to the selection of only those actors to leadership positions who embody the organization’s mission. &nbsp;</p><p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image 0'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title="imgupl_floating_none"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_large/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" alt="" title="imgupl_floating_none" width="300" height="115" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload 0 imagecache imagecache-article_large" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'></span></span></p> <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0; URL=' http://www.openglobalrights.org/international-organizations-and-crisis-of-legitimacy/'" /><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="http://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/OpenGlobalRights-highlight4English.png" alt="" width="140" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-sidebox"> <div class="field-label"> Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href=" https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights-openpage"><img src=" https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/openPagesidebox.png " width="140" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/yonatan-lupu/following-orders-how-expectations-might-reduce-human-rights-abuses">Following orders: how expectations might reduce human rights abuses</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/robert-precht/engagement-versus-endorsement-western-universities-in-china">Engagement versus endorsement: Western universities in China</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jessica-m-wyndham-margaret-weigers-vitullo/why-right-to-science-matters-for-everyone">Why the right to science matters for everyone</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/alicia-ely-yamin/speaking-truth-to-power-call-for-praxis-in-human-rights">“Speaking truth to power:” a call for praxis in human rights</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/douglas-mathew-mawadri/fighting-stigma-protecting-mental-health-of-african-rights-a">Fighting stigma: protecting the mental health of African rights advocates</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/meg-satterthwaite/evidence-of-trauma-impact-of-human-rights-work-on-advocates">Evidence of trauma: the impact of human rights work on advocates</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/luis-felipe-cruz-olivera/collapse-of-authority-violence-against-prisoners-in-latin-">The collapse of authority: violence against prisoners in Latin America</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights openGlobalRights-openpage Nives Dolšak Aseem Prakash Global Fri, 09 Jun 2017 08:30:00 +0000 Aseem Prakash and Nives Dolšak 111530 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Evicted rights in Spain: no room of one’s own https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/koldo-casla/eviction-rights-in-spain-no-room-of-one-s-own <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/no se vende_0.png" alt="" width="140" /></p><p>Thousands of people are being evicted in Spain due to austerity measures, and women are disproportionately affected by structural inequality. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/debating-economic-and-social-rights" target="_blank">economic and social rights</a>. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/koldo-casla/desahucios-en-espa-sin-habitaci-n-propia" target="_blank">Español</a></em></strong>.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <p dir="ltr">If Virginia Woolf needed a room of her own to write fiction (and much more), Paula needs a place to call home to live her life and to raise her kids. But ineffective policies are blocking her at every turn. Paula is just one of thousands of women who cannot escape the trap of insecure housing after going through an eviction in Spain.</p><p class="mag-quote-center" dir="ltr">More than 30,000 households&nbsp;were evicted from their rented homes last year alone.</p><p dir="ltr"><a href="http://www.poderjudicial.es/cgpj/es/Temas/Estadistica-Judicial/Estudios-e-Informes/Efecto-de-la-Crisis-en-los-organos-judiciales/" target="_blank">More than 30,000 households</a> were evicted from their rented homes last year alone, as in the previous one, and the one before. The number of households evicted from mortgaged properties does not fall far behind.</p><p dir="ltr">Going through an eviction is a traumatic experience for everyone, but Amnesty International has <a href="https://www.es.amnesty.org/en-que-estamos/noticias/noticia/articulo/diez-anos-despues-del-inicio-de-la-crisis-las-autoridades-continuan-violando-el-derecho-a-la-viv/" target="_blank">documented</a> that women often experience it differently—and more frequently. Women are overrepresented in part-time jobs, find themselves at the lower end of the pay gap, and regularly bear domestic care duties. Single-parent families, which are predominantly headed by women (in <a href="http://www.inmujer.gob.es/estadisticas/consulta.do?area=2" target="_blank">more than eight out of ten cases</a>), often live in rental accommodations. <a href="http://www.ine.es/ss/Satellite?c=INESeccion_C&amp;p=1254735110672&amp;pagename=ProductosYServicios%2FPYSLayout&amp;cid=1259941637944&amp;L=1" target="_blank">Official statistics</a> show that these families also face higher than average rates of poverty, social exclusion and material deprivation.</p><p dir="ltr">Amnesty International interviewed 19 women and four men who either have gone through an eviction or are at risk of being evicted. At least seven of them complained that the judge had not enquired about their personal circumstances. “We did not get the chance to explain our situation to the judge,” said Ana. A female judge in Barcelona confirmed this problem, saying: “When we receive the eviction suit, we have absolutely no idea who lives there.”</p> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Begins--> <div style="color: #999999; font-size: 11px; line-height: normal; font-style: italic; text-align: right;"> <img style="max-width: 100%; background-color: #ffffff; padding: 7px; border: 1px solid #999999;" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/no se vende_0.png" width="444" /> <br /> Amnesty International 2017 (All rights reserved) </div> <p style="color: #666666; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;"> Despite some optimistic market and macroeconomic projections, the housing rights crisis in Spain is far from over.</p> <hr style="color: #d2d3d5; background-color: #d2d3d5; height: 1px; width: 85%; border: none; text-align: center; margin: 0 auto;" /> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Ends--> <p>Paula, a single mother of three and a survivor of gender-based violence, was evicted from a social apartment sold in 2013 by the Regional Housing Authority of Madrid to an investment trust, alongside nearly 3000 other properties. Relying on unstable part time work, bills piled up and Paula could not keep up with payments. It was not long before she received the eviction order. “My daughter left a note asking the new tenants to let us stay. My five-year-old son still asks when we are going back home.” At the time of this writing, Paula and her family are still waiting for an alternative housing solution from public authorities in Madrid.</p><p dir="ltr">Most women interviewed by Amnesty International reported that social services recommended people facing an eviction, including those with children, to move in with their parents, relatives or friends. Municipal social workers explained to us that this was necessary due to insufficient resources made available to them. Sometimes social services may recommend people to look for and rent a room in the private market, offering to cover the costs. However, this is not always a feasible alternative for single mothers and women with care responsibilities, and it is not adequate for children either.</p> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Begins--> <div style="color: #999999; font-size: 11px; line-height: normal; font-style: italic; text-align: right;"> <img style="max-width: 100%; background-color: #ffffff; padding: 7px; border: 1px solid #999999;" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/ai report cover (1).png" width="444" /> <br /> Amnesty International 2017 (All rights reserved) </div> <p style="color: #666666; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;"> Given the largely insufficient public housing stock, even survivors of gender-based violence that are granted a restraining order are forced to wait for a long time without assurances.</p> <hr style="color: #d2d3d5; background-color: #d2d3d5; height: 1px; width: 85%; border: none; text-align: center; margin: 0 auto;" /> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Ends--> <p dir="ltr">Survivors of gender-based violence are even more exposed to the consequences of uncoordinated and poorly resourced housing policies and social services. Whilst the <a href="https://www.eurofound.europa.eu/observatories/eurwork/articles/new-gender-based-violence-law-has-workplace-implications" target="_blank">2004 Comprehensive Law on Gender-Based Violence</a> established that survivors should be treated as a priority group to access social housing, authorities in the Region of Madrid make this conditional upon a court conviction or a restraining order. This effectively means that most survivors of gender-based violence do not get the necessary support to satisfy their right to housing. It is encouraging to see that, only three weeks after the publication of Amnesty International’s report, the Government of the Region of Madrid has <a href="http://www.elmundo.es/madrid/2017/05/31/592ec021e2704ead738b45f8.html" target="_blank">announced</a> its intention to put an end to this restrictive policy. That said, given the largely insufficient public housing stock, even survivors of gender-based violence that are granted a restraining order are forced to wait for a long time without assurances, as in the case of Paula. What is supposed to be a protective measure becomes no more than an empty promise.</p><p>Housing is clearly not a priority for Spanish authorities. Spain’s central/federal public spending on housing and community amenities lies well below that of most OECD countries. The <a href="http://www.sepg.pap.minhap.gob.es/sitios/sepg/es-ES/Presupuestos/Estadisticas/Documents/2016/01%20Presupuestos%20Generales%20del%20Estado%20Consolidados.pdf" target="_blank">2016 federal budget</a> on access to housing and support for housing renovation was €587 million, less than 37% of the €1.6 billion allocated in 2009. The <a href="https://www.idealista.com/news/finanzas/economia/2017/04/04/745993-la-vivienda-solo-supone-10-centimos-de-cada-100-euros-de-gasto-de-los-presupuestos-de" target="_blank">2017 proposed budget</a>, soon to be formally approved in Parliament, reduces the allocation 20% more. Even considering the severe austerity imposed in the county, no other budget item experienced such a significant reduction during the economic crisis. In no other OECD-member country have house prices outpaced income as much as in Spain. Spain is also the EU Member State with the <a href="http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/documents/2995521/7747215/2-29112016-AP-EN.pdf/39954d6e-eb8a-4b1b-98db-ad1d801128aa" target="_blank">highest growth in personal housing expenditure</a> in the last decade.</p><p dir="ltr">Despite <a href="http://www.imf.org/external/country/ESP/" target="_blank">some optimistic market and macroeconomic projections</a>, the housing rights crisis in Spain is far from over. With the exceptions of the <a href="http://noticias.juridicas.com/base_datos/CCAA/555512-l-3-2015-de-18-jun-ca-pais-vasco-de-vivienda.html" target="_blank">Basque Country</a> and the <a href="http://www.dogv.gva.es/datos/2017/02/09/pdf/2017_1039.pdf" target="_blank">Region of Valencia</a>, Spanish laws do not recognize that housing is a human right. Existing policies both at the federal and the regional levels clearly lack the necessary gender perspective to address the structural inequalities too many women fight with every day. This would entail higher investment in social housing but also, among other things, requiring judges to assess the proportionality of an eviction on a case-by-case basis, and providing a comprehensive response to survivors of gender-based violence, in line with the <a href="http://www.coe.int/en/web/istanbul-convention/home" target="_blank">Istanbul Convention</a> of the Council of Europe.</p><p>Put bluntly, human rights are not worth the paper they are written on when thousands of women, men and children lack a place to call home.</p><p class="p1">**<i>Koldo Casla authored Amnesty International’s "</i><a href="https://www.es.amnesty.org/uploads/media/Inf.Vivienda_FIN2.pdf">The housing crisis is not over</a>"&nbsp;<i>report.</i></p><p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image 0'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title="imgupl_floating_none"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_large/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" alt="" title="imgupl_floating_none" width="300" height="115" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload 0 imagecache imagecache-article_large" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'></span></span></p> <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0; URL=' http://www.openglobalrights.org/eviction-rights-in-spain-no-room-of-one-s-own/'" /><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="http://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/OpenGlobalRights-highlight4English.png" alt="" width="140" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-sidebox"> <div class="field-label"> Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/debating-economic-and-social-rights" target="_blank"> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/Economic_Social_Inset_1.png" border="0" alt="Debating economic and social rights – Read on" width="140" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/sakiko-fukuda-parr/human-rights-are-not-losing-traction-in-global-south">Human rights are not losing traction in the global South</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/eric-posner/twilight-of-human-rights-law">The twilight of human rights law</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/steven-l-b-jensen/decolonization-not-western-liberals-established-human-rights-on-g">Decolonization—not western liberals—established human rights on the global agenda</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/stephen-hopgood/human-rights-past-their-sell-by-date">Human rights: past their sell-by date</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/samuel-moyn/human-rights-and-age-of-inequality">Human rights and the age of inequality</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/beth-simmons/twilight-or-dark-glasses-reply-to-eric-posner">Twilight or dark glasses? A reply to Eric Posner</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/wendy-h-wong/human-rights-aren%E2%80%99t-revolutionary-good">Human rights aren’t revolutionary? Good!</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights Koldo Casla Western Europe Debating economic and social rights Wed, 07 Jun 2017 08:30:00 +0000 Koldo Casla 111447 at https://www.opendemocracy.net The moral hazards of conflating what is useful with what is right https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/mythri-jayaraman/moral-hazards-of-conflating-what-is-useful-with-what-is-right <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/JayaramanJune.jpg" alt="" width="140" /></p><p>To suggest that we should only seek to understand perpetrators if it’s “useful” is contrary to the universality of human dignity. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on&nbsp;<a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/engaging-with-perpetrators-for-human-rights" target="_blank">engaging perpetrators</a>.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p dir="ltr">As a public defender, many of my clients have been the victims of police abuses, from being subjected to public humiliation to being shot—unarmed—by the police. In late 2015, while in the West Bank working with the International Legal Foundation and local Palestinian public defenders, part of my assignment was to attend roundtable meetings with representatives from the Palestinian Public Prosecution and the police force, among others. I had never engaged with police officers in this way, and the intimacy of understanding brought on by rounds of dialogue was initially disorienting. However, the local public defenders leading these meetings strove to understand the officers while never softening their stance against police abuses. These lawyers maintained that the officers, like our clients, had to be understood as a matter of principle. </p><p dir="ltr">The question of whether activists should engage by attempting to understand state perpetrators of violence is very different from the question of whether activists should engage by collaborating with them. It may be that, in the end, the answer to one is yes while the other is no. But to maintain a position that activists should not attempt to understand perpetrators of state violence is untenable from an activist perspective. As <a target="_blank" href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/rachel-wahl/working-with-enemy-pros-and-cons-of-collaborating-with-perpetrators">Rachel Wahl</a> eloquently puts it, “An irony persists when those who affirm universal human dignity cast some people as beyond understanding.” Understanding and engaging with security officers is useful, especially with the goal of disrupting groupthink and harmful norms. More important, however, is that engaging with such perpetrators is right. As human rights advocates we cannot hold anyone to be beyond worthy of understanding, even as we proclaim their actions to be so.</p><p dir="ltr" class="mag-quote-center">Being a public defender means acknowledging the inherent dignity of every human being.</p><p dir="ltr">One concern that arises when public defenders and other human rights advocates engage with security sector organizations is that others may see it as a compromise. This could delegitimize human rights efforts in the eyes of the public at large, the loved ones of the victims, and—worst of all—the security organizations themselves. Presumably, one “moral hazard” is that we may end up diminishing criminal liability, undermining the prosecutions of such state perpetrators of violence, and ultimately excusing their violence as deterministically compelled.</p><p dir="ltr">While many people find such defenses distasteful in the context of civilian-on-civilian crimes, the idea that an entire security organization/police force could successfully deflect responsibility is even more frightening. One way to avoid this hazard is to distinguish between perpetrators’ reasons and the causes of their actions. This is the kind of work done by ethnographic interviews with police, such as in work by<a target="_blank" href="https://www.amazon.com/Just-Violence-Torture-Stanford-Studies/dp/1503601013/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1494254435&amp;sr=8-1&amp;keywords=rachel+wahl"> Rachel Wahl</a> and <a target="_blank" href="https://www.amazon.com/Evil-Men-James-Dawes/dp/0674416791/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1494254464&amp;sr=8-2&amp;keywords=James+Dawes">James Dawes</a>, for example. By accepting that individual perpetrators have reasons for their behaviors, we are granting them the rational ability to reason—which is required for moral accountability and prosecution. We do not assume, however, that officers’ self-understanding explains or excuses their actions.</p><p dir="ltr"><a target="_blank" href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/danielle-celermajer/navigating-minefield-of-working-with-perpetrators">Danielle Celermajer</a> makes a compelling argument for why it could be beneficial to collaborate with state perpetrators of violence. Rather than endorsing the pursuit of such collaboration, she suggests that if understanding such perpetrators allows the human rights community to stop these abuses, then we should pursue this understanding.&nbsp;</p> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Begins--> <div style="color: #999999; font-size: 11px; line-height: normal; font-style: italic; text-align: right;"> <img style="max-width: 100%; background-color: #ffffff; padding: 7px; border: 1px solid #999999;" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/JayaramanJune.jpg" width="444" /> <br />Flickr/ Rusty Stewart (Some rights reserved). </div> <p style="color: #666666; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;">If we in the human rights community see state security officers who do immoral things as similarly “other”, do we not simply become the next link?</p> <hr style="color: #d2d3d5; background-color: #d2d3d5; height: 1px; width: 85%; border: none; text-align: center; margin: 0 auto;" /> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Ends--> <p dir="ltr">Respectfully, I would push us to go further. Being a public defender means acknowledging the inherent dignity of every human being—parents and priests, child soldiers and child molesters, police and pedophiles. We value human dignity for its own sake. To suggest that we should only seek to understand perpetrators if the data says it’s a good idea is contrary to the universality of human dignity.</p><p dir="ltr">There is no moral quandary—let alone moral hazard—in understanding the humanity (and therefore, the human reasons) of people who perpetrate crimes, while repudiating the crimes themselves.</p><p dir="ltr">As a public defender I have represented people who have been accused of, and have sometimes been guilty of, violent crimes—shootings, robberies, and murders. Many human rights activists are comfortable distinguishing these crimes from crimes perpetrated by official state actors because of the power differential between security officer perpetrators and their victims. This, perhaps, is one reason that these same human rights activists become uneasy when I discuss with them some of the other offenses of which my clients are accused—domestic violence, rape of children, and other crimes where the power differential is similar to that between state actors and civilians. </p><p dir="ltr">Perhaps this very repugnance can aid us in understanding perpetrators of violence, from my clients to state security personnel. Typically, such violence is perpetrated by people who perceive the victim as being completely “other”. In turn, the police who apprehend them see my clients as similarly completely “other”. &nbsp;Many sheriffs have asked me, “How can you defend that guy after what he did to that woman? &nbsp;How can you say that guy is still a human being after what he’s done? &nbsp;He’s a monster.” &nbsp;This “other-ness” allows the police to dehumanize my clients and engage in violent acts against them, with that same inability to empathize. In each link, this objectification seems to allow them to engage in otherwise unthinkable acts. Just as we see them (errant police officers) as an impediment to truth and justice, so in turn do they see my clients (their inmates)—as an impediment to a just society. </p><p dir="ltr">If we in the human rights community see state security officers who do immoral things as similarly “other”, do we not simply become the next link? When we cheer the punishment that some violent security/police officer has received for his immoral acts, without wondering for a moment about the loved ones he is leaving behind or his own well-being, aren’t we just as guilty of denying his humanity? This understanding does not mean that we should not prosecute and punish these perpetrators. Indeed, in the past ten years, Philadelphia police officers have fired their weapons at civilians 435 times; 103 of these times the shots were fatal. And not one of these officers was charged criminally. Understanding these officers does not require a subscription to some probabilistic determinism on their behalf. Rather, it means that these officers are credited with the same rational thinking that we allow others and they are held accountable for the actions that they rationally choose. </p><p dir="ltr">But why is it worthwhile to engage given the “risks”? A greater moral hazard exists in not engaging with and understanding perpetrators. &nbsp;By failing to engage, we simultaneously miss the opportunity to cement the perpetrators’ personal responsibility for their crimes and discredit our own work by failing to affirm the basic tenet of humanity in all. Human dignity cannot be selectively afforded. Doing so poses a greater moral dilemma than acknowledging the dignity of perpetrators and engaging with them.</p><p dir="ltr">If we could characterize our work as simply advocating for the underdog, we could work hard but sleep easy. True activism is uncomfortable. Should we seek to understand and engage with violent perpetrators and human rights abusers? Our belief in human dignity mandates that we must.</p><p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image 0'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title="imgupl_floating_none"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_large/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" alt="" title="imgupl_floating_none" width="300" height="115" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload 0 imagecache imagecache-article_large" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'></span></span></p> <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0; URL=' http://www.openglobalrights.org/the-moral-hazards-of-conflating-what-is-useful-with-what-is-right/'" /><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="http://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/OpenGlobalRights-highlight4English.png" alt="" width="140" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-sidebox"> <div class="field-label"> Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/engaging-with-perpetrators-for-human-rights" onmouseout="document.Imgs.src='https://opendemocracy.net/files/Perps_inset_1.png'" onmouseover="document.Imgs.src=' https://opendemocracy.net/files/Perps_inset_2.png'"><img width="140" alt="“Perpetrators" border="0" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/Perps_inset_1.png" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/navaz-kotwal/engage-when-we-can-confront-when-we-must">Engage when we can, confront when we must</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/mahmood-monshipouri/why-engaging-with-perpetrators-isn-t-possible-in-iran-yet">Why engaging with perpetrators isn’t possible in Iran (yet)</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/danielle-celermajer/navigating-minefield-of-working-with-perpetrators">Navigating the minefield of working with perpetrators</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/james-dawes/to-understand-perpetrators-we-must-care-about-them">To understand perpetrators, we must care about them</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/rachel-wahl/working-with-enemy-pros-and-cons-of-collaborating-with-perpetrators">Working with the enemy: the pros and cons of collaborating with perpetrators</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/kiran-grewal/to-change-torture-practices-we-must-change-entire-system">To change torture practices, we must change the entire system</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/christine-monaghan/accountability-versus-access-collaborating-with-rights-violators">Accountability versus access: collaborating with rights violators in conflict zones</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights Mythri Jayaraman Global Engaging with Perpetrators in Human Rights Tue, 06 Jun 2017 08:30:00 +0000 Mythri Jayaraman 111393 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Revolutions are built on hope: the role of funders in collective self-care https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/shena-cavallo-jocelyn-berger-michelle-truong/revolutions-are-built-on-hope-role-of- <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/Berger et. alMay.jpg" alt="" width="140" /></p><p>Funder practices are vital to alleviate partner advocates’ stress, anxiety, and burnout from uncertainty or rigid requirements. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/mental-health-and-well-being-in-human-rights">mental health and human rights</a>. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/jocelyn-berger-shena-cavallo-michelle-truong/las-revoluciones-se-construyen-partir-" target="_blank">Español</a></em></strong>.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p dir="ltr">What can activists do when traditional advocacy efforts are often deemed “subversive” or “undermining national interests”? Globally, we see space for civil society decreasing and government repression increasing—from Brazil to Egypt to India. At the <a href="http://www.iwhc.org" target="_blank">International Women’s Health Coalition</a>, we support feminist organizations advocating for the sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) of women and girls around the world. Among our partners, we’re seeing a rise in alternative approaches in response to these troubling global trends, and among them: collective self-care. </p><p dir="ltr">As social justice champions, collectivizing our struggles, including our self-care, exponentially ensures our survival and sustains our movements. This is especially crucial because the potential <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/meg-satterthwaite/evidence-of-trauma-impact-of-human-rights-work-on-advocates" target="_blank">to feel despair, stress, anger, burnout, trauma and isolation increases</a> when working in oppressive contexts.</p><p class="mag-quote-center" dir="ltr">In settings where human rights and social justice activists are subjected to intense repression, structural inequalities and threats, surviving is a major achievement.</p><p dir="ltr">One of our strategies to accomplish this is to explicitly structure our financial support to prioritize our partners’ autonomy. Grants should reflect the cost of doing business in the countries where our partners work, and organizations should not be forced to operate on a shoestring budget or make sacrifices that funders do not. Flexible funding is essential for partners who do advocacy work, because this funding allows them to be agile and respond to threats and opportunities as they emerge. Our grantmaking often provides partners with unrestricted funding that can be used towards institutional costs, such as salaries, professional development, rent, or digital security. This is an essential component of a <a href="http://thewhitmaninstitute.org/purpose/approach/" target="_blank">trust-based grantmaking strategy</a> that foregrounds partners’ freedom to allocate resources as they see fit, including covering costs not directly linked to specific activities or projects. When possible, we also provide our partners with long-term support and eliminate unnecessary bureaucratic burdens. These funder practices, in our organization and others, can help to alleviate partners’ stress, anxiety, and burnout from uncertainty or rigid requirements, freeing up time and energy for resistance work, and to plan ahead.</p><p dir="ltr">This type of grantmaking approach also affirms the collective self-care approaches that partners are using as part of their resistance strategies. In settings where human rights and social justice activists (not to mention marginalized and/or minority identities), are subjected to intense repression, structural inequalities and threats, surviving is a major achievement. In the <a target="_blank" href="http://www.cfemea.org.br/images/stories/publicacoes/folder_cuidado_entre_ativistas_english.pdf">words of Brazilian feminist musician Lidi de Oliveira</a>, “Self-care is a political act, it is something revolutionary for us and dangerous for those who want to oppress us.” Many advocates are focusing on building coalitions, strengthening cross-movement collaboration, and operationalizing solidarity as a way that will ultimately strengthen direct advocacy. Embattled causes must align to strengthen one another and support each other’s survival. Banding together is also a powerful way to resist divide and conquer strategies and &nbsp;scapegoating tactics typical of repressive regimes.</p><p dir="ltr">For example, the Indian Coalition for Maternal-Neonatal Health and Safe Abortion, <a href="http://www.commonhealth.in" target="_blank">CommonHealth</a>, recently invited representatives from various social movements to join its annual members’ meeting. By immersing in each other’s struggles, participants demonstrate several important aspects of collective self-care. First, this relationship-building creates an environment that fosters care for all, rather than relegating the challenges of survival onto the individual when they need support the most. Second, by embodying solidarity across movements, members amplify their collective resilience and capacity to resist government repression. Sharing responsibilities across a specialized division of labor within a coalition (advocates, researchers, providers, etc.) reduces the labor and emotional burden borne by each individual and organization. Third, it’s a smart strategy for CommonHealth: increasing inclusivity and diversity allows the coalition to more accurately represent the full range of Indians’ SRHR needs, which is necessary for better policy analysis, implementation and change.</p> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Begins--> <div style="color: #999999; font-size: 11px; line-height: normal; font-style: italic; text-align: right;"> <img style="max-width: 100%; background-color: #ffffff; padding: 7px; border: 1px solid #999999;" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/Berger et. alMay.jpg" width="444" /> <br />Flickr/ Tribes of the World (Some rights reserved). </div> <p style="color: #666666; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;">As social justice champions, collectivizing our struggles, including our self-care, exponentially ensures our survival and sustains our movements..</p> <hr style="color: #d2d3d5; background-color: #d2d3d5; height: 1px; width: 85%; border: none; text-align: center; margin: 0 auto;" /> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Ends--> <p dir="ltr">It is important, however, to recognize that approaches vary across regions, and partners’ notions of self-care must lead the way. For example, our flexible, long-term funding to <a href="http://www.cfemea.org.br/" target="_blank">CFEMEA</a> (Centro Feminista de Estudos e Assessoria – Center for Feminist Studies and Advisory Services, in Brazil), supported them to begin training the next generation of activists on advocacy with the Brazilian Congress, while also offering trainings for activists working on environmental and racial justice issues. In the Middle East and North Africa, where many activists face imprisonment and harassment, organizations choose to focus on low-cost, low-profile activities, while hiring consultants to bolster digital security and setting aside funds for legal defense.</p><p dir="ltr">Additionally, IWHC’s learning, monitoring and evaluation team creates space for reflection that enable our partners’ collective self-care. In doing so, we not only have the opportunity to help sustain movements, but to learn from them—and to better advocate for and support our partners. For example, we funded a Uruguayan feminist organization, <a href="http://www.mysu.org.uy" target="_blank">Mujer y Salud en Uruguay</a> (MYSU – Women and Health in Uruguay), to commission a<a href="http://www.mysu.org.uy/multimedia/noticia/mysu-presenta-el-libro-abortus-interruptus/" target="_blank"> study</a> analyzing its contributions to a long, successful fight to expand abortion rights. While this exercise ensured that the feminist activists’ contributions were not erased from this historic, monumental struggle, it also served to celebrate their win and rejuvenate the activists before launching into another uphill battle—ensuring the new law’s implementation. This opportunity to document, celebrate and share victories is one way to measure success and encourage sustainability of the ongoing work of feminist resistance and movement-building. </p><p>Funders can also support the wellbeing and sustainability of partners by adjusting expectations of grantees: perhaps survival in the face of constant opposition is itself a measure of success. Funders can attempt to measure resilience as a positive outcome through documentation and evaluation projects. We have found that activists rarely have time to rest, reflect, and rejuvenate. With this in mind, funders must strive to support partners’ efforts to pause, learn, and recharge both for the sake of improving learning in the field, and to buoy mental and emotional wellbeing.</p><p dir="ltr">As feminist and rights-based funders, we often consider the implications of shrinking civil society space and mounting repression. And while there is no magic bullet, funders should reflect the ways in which we are supporting grantees and/or overburdening them. A paradigm shift is necessary for funders to see ourselves as promoters and supporters of collective self-care. We can do this by offering flexible and long-term support, encouraging collaboration, creating space for restorative reflection, and above all, centering our partners’ needs and solutions.</p><p dir="ltr">Professor Cornell West famously said, “Justice is what love looks like in public.” For us at IWHC, supporting collective self-care and love in service of justice is itself a profound and radical act of resistance, and integral to our feminism.</p><p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image 0'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title="imgupl_floating_none"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_large/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" alt="" title="imgupl_floating_none" width="300" height="115" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload 0 imagecache imagecache-article_large" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'></span></span></p> <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0; URL=' http://www.openglobalrights.org/revolutions-are-built-on-hope-the-role-of-funders-in-collective-self-care/?lang=English'" /><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="http://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/OpenGlobalRights-highlight4English.png" alt="" width="140" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-sidebox"> <div class="field-label"> Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a onmouseout="document.Imgs.src='https://opendemocracy.net/files/Mental-health_inset_1.png'" onmouseover="document.Imgs.src=' https://opendemocracy.net/files/Mental-health_inset_2.png'" target="_blank" href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/mental-health-and-well-being-in-human-rights"><img alt="“Data" border="0" name="Imgs" width="140" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/Mental-health_inset_1.png" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/meerim-ilyas-tatiana-cordero-vel-squez/collective-care-in-human-rights-funding-poli">Collective care in human rights funding: a political stand</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/kristi-pinderi/when-advocacy-work-builds-resilience-everyone-benefits">When advocacy work builds resilience, everyone benefits</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/zelalem-kibret/ready-for-anything-how-preparation-can-improve-trauma-recovery">Ready for anything: how preparation can improve trauma recovery</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/holly-davis-magda-adamowicz/security-and-well-being-two-sides-of-same-coin">Security and well-being: two sides of the same coin</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/alexandra-zetes/turning-weakness-into-strength-lessons-as-new-advocate">Turning weakness into strength: lessons as a new advocate</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/sam-dubberley/when-watching-violence-is-your-job-workers-on-digital-frontline">When watching violence is your job: workers on the digital frontline</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/fred-abrahams/healthy-for-long-haul-building-resilience-in-human-rights-workers">Healthy for the long haul: building resilience in human rights workers</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights Michelle Truong Jocelyn Berger Shena Cavallo Global Mental Health and Well-being in Human Rights Wed, 31 May 2017 08:30:00 +0000 Shena Cavallo, Jocelyn Berger and Michelle Truong 111288 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Exploring new possibilities beyond foreign funding in Brazil https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/amanda-fazano/exploring-new-possibilities-beyond-foreign-funding-in-brazil <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/FazanoMay.jpg" alt="" width="140" /></p><p dir="ltr">Brazil has a potentially large philanthropy market, and social media may be key to tapping into this resource. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/funding-for-human-rights" target="_blank">funding and human rights.</a>&nbsp;<em><strong><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/amanda-fazano/explorando-novas-possibilidades-al-m-do-financiamento-estrangeiro-no-brasil" target="_blank">Português</a>. <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/amanda-fazano/explorando-nuevas-posibilidades-m-s-all-del-financiamiento-extranjero" target="_blank">Español</a>.&nbsp;</strong></em></p> </div> </div> </div> <p dir="ltr">For many years, large foreign financiers, such as foundations and multilateral funds, were the only source of funding for Brazilian human rights organizations. However, more recently, critics—such as conservative elements of society and government—have been questioning the dependence on these funders..</p><p dir="ltr">Reassessing their business models and, most importantly, diversifying sources of funding, could be the first steps that human rights NGOs need to take to achieve legitimate support for their cause. This shift could create benefits that go beyond financial sustainability, bolstering a human rights movement in Brazil that needs to be strengthened in light of the current complex political scenario.</p><p dir="ltr">Edwin Rekosh <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/edwin-rekosh/to-preserve-human-rights-organizational-models-must-change" target="_blank">recently argued</a> that the current human rights business model is not keeping up with trends in technology, philanthropy, business, and society. A change of business model and the diversification of sources of funding—exploring other means such as individual contributions—demand that an organization reinvent itself, moving away from traditional structures and processes. Such a change would also require remaining open to the new digital and communication trends that are becoming essential to mobilize and engage citizens.</p><p dir="ltr">Organizations that were established in Brazil in the early 1990s, such as Médecins Sans Frontières and Greenpeace, created solid communication, fundraising, and marketing structures that assured their brands’ strong presence in the country. The robust individual giving market that these organizations created then called the attention of other international NGOs such as Oxfam and International Amnesty, who started their operations in Brazil in 2012 with ambitious fundraising goals.&nbsp;</p><p class="mag-quote-center" dir="ltr">Latin America is nearly uncharted territory, full of possibilities for the fundraising market.</p><p dir="ltr">Evidently, large organizations can rely on sizeable initial investments from their headquarters’ annual budget to set out the conditions that maintain national budgets that are in the millions. In 2015, for example, Greenpeace Brazil had an annual budget of over R$ 29 million. Beyond financial investments, these organizations also invested in people, training an army dedicated to mobilizing and fundraising in order to reach people online and on the streets with a simple, emotional and concise message. </p><p dir="ltr">Unfortunately, such large sums are not available for Brazilian human rights NGOs that are struggling just to keep programs running—they cannot afford to make significant investments into fundraising and establishing a brand. Is there space for national organizations to diversify their sources of funding and fundraise with individuals under such diverse conditions?</p><p dir="ltr">The answer is not simple, but Latin America is nearly uncharted territory, full of possibilities for the fundraising market. <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/james-ron-david-crow-jos-kaire/ordinary-people-will-pay-for-rights-we-asked-them" target="_blank">James Ron’s</a> research in Mexico suggests that if human rights organizations use fundraising strategies based on solid data, transparency and their credibility, the general public will be more likely to contribute.</p><p dir="ltr">In Brazil, IDIS (the Institute for the Development of Social Investment) led research on the philanthropic behavior of Brazilians—donors and non-donors were included in the study—and the findings are promising. At least 52% of Brazilians made a contribution in 2015 and, among those who did not donate, 29% stated that they were simply not approached. These findings indicate that Brazil is indeed open for the development of a larger philanthropy market.</p><p dir="ltr">The Brazilian organization Conectas Human Rights has been investing in the reformulation of its business model since 2015 to address these issues. The first step we took was a brand renewal project that started after a detailed analysis to rethink communication and marketing strategies, mainly to build empathy with Brazilians through relevant narratives that match the aspirations of a diversity of audiences.</p> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Begins--> <div style="color: #999999; font-size: 11px; line-height: normal; font-style: italic; text-align: right;"><img style="max-width: 100%; background-color: #ffffff; padding: 7px; border: 1px solid #999999;" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/FazanoMay.jpg" width="444" /> <br /> Flickr/WOCinTech Chat (Some Rights Reserved) </div> <p style="color: #666666; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;">Digital fundraising allows us to experiment with different messages and audiences, performance indicators can be measured more easily and it is significantly cheaper.</p> <hr style="color: #d2d3d5; background-color: #d2d3d5; height: 1px; width: 85%; border: none; text-align: center; margin: 0 auto;" /> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Ends--> <p dir="ltr">We need to acknowledge that we work with an unpopular cause. In Brazil, the most conservative segments of society know how to use new technologies and the media to build the idea that human rights “protect criminals”. Historically, the Brazilian human rights movement did not know how to effectively confront this narrative and keep up with marketing and communication trends.</p><p dir="ltr">In response, Conectas made another important choice: to exclusively invest in digital fundraising with individuals. Although this source traditionally results in smaller monthly contributions than others, for instance, street and telephone fundraising, digital fundraising allows us to experiment with different messages and audiences, performance indicators can be measured more easily and it is significantly cheaper, costing 50% less to reach the intended audience. &nbsp;In addition, online donor retention rates are higher than other individual fundraising channels. Conectas, for example, retained more than 80% of all online donors acquired in the last six months.</p><p dir="ltr">There are a number of necessary measures for the implementation of a digital fundraising program. First, having a communications staff working in partnership with the fundraising team is essential to achieving successful strategies; moreover, both teams need to have aligned narratives and coherent messages. Often, the messages from the fundraising and communications teams can diverge, as if coming from two separate organizations, which hampers the general public’s understanding of the cause. This confusion directly affects the credibility of the narrative and, consequently, can damage fundraising results.</p><p dir="ltr">The second step is an investment in systems. Today, having a CRM—Customer Relationship Management—platform integrated with payment methods and donation forms is not a luxury only for large operations, but a necessity for smaller organizations too. Without an adequate CRM tool, our donor’s data security is at risk. Payment mistakes may cost us a good relationship with a donor, who will likely share the bad experience on social media, jeopardizing all of our work dedicated to building a positive image.</p><p>Although this seems to be a strenuous process with long-term financial returns, setting up fundraising with individuals brings other institutional benefits that are more immediately apparent. This is an opportunity to both rethink how NGOs address different audiences and to revisit their structures, so that they can be ready for new and challenging scenarios. Moreover, progress in this sector depends on effective collaboration among these organizations, which can no longer expect to rely on a single funding source but can, together, effectively create a solid philanthropy market in Brazil by sharing knowledge and good practices.</p><p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image 0'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title="imgupl_floating_none"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_large/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" alt="" title="imgupl_floating_none" width="300" height="115" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload 0 imagecache imagecache-article_large" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'></span></span></p> <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0; URL=' http://www.openglobalrights.org/exploring-new-possibilities-beyond-foreign-funding-in-brazil/'" /><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="http://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/OpenGlobalRights-highlight4English.png" alt="" width="140" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-sidebox"> <div class="field-label"> Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a onmouseout="document.Imgs.src='http://www.opendemocracy.net/files/Funding_Inset_1.png'" onmouseover="document.Imgs.src='http://www.opendemocracy.net/files/Funding_Inset_2.png'" target="_blank" href="http://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/funding-for-human-rights"> <img alt="Funding for human rights – Read on" border="0" name="Imgs" width="140" src="http://www.opendemocracy.net/files/Funding_Inset_1.png" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/david-crow-jos-kaire-and-james-ron/monetizing-human-rights-brand">Monetizing the human rights “brand”</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/james-ron-david-crow-jos-kaire/ordinary-people-will-pay-for-rights-we-asked-them">Ordinary people will pay for rights. We asked them</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/maina-kiai/from-funding-projects-to-funding-struggles-reimagining-role-of-donors">From funding projects to funding struggles: Reimagining the role of donors</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/lotta-teale/how-to-pay-for-legal-empowerment-alternative-structures-and-sources">How to pay for legal empowerment: alternative structures and sources</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/burkhard-gn-rig/old-world-of-civic-participation-is-being-replaced">The old world of civic participation is being replaced</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/edwin-rekosh/to-preserve-human-rights-organizational-models-must-change">To preserve human rights, organizational models must change</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/laura-piazza/fast-and-flexible-support-ingredients-to-enrich-lgbti-campaigning">Fast and flexible support: ingredients to enrich LGBTI campaigning</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights Amanda Fazano Central and South America, & the Caribbean Funding for Human Rights Tue, 30 May 2017 08:30:00 +0000 Amanda Fazano 111234 at https://www.opendemocracy.net New strategies for tackling inequality with human rights https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/mart-n-abreg/new-strategies-for-tackling-inequality-with-human-rights <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/Abregu.jpg" alt="" width="140" /></p><p>To confront inequality, the Ford Foundation is harnessing the human rights framework to address political and socio-economic systems. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/economic-inequality-and-human-rights" target="_blank">economic inequality and human rights</a>.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p dir="ltr">In the two years since the Ford Foundation identified inequality as the central focus of all our grantmaking, I have been asked countless times: "What does this mean for the foundation’s support for human rights work?"</p><p dir="ltr">Put simply, we will continue to be a major funder in this field, supporting human rights actors and practices to overcome inequality. But this does not mean business as usual for us. Rather, it represents a more complex mix of continuity and disruption.</p><p class="mag-quote-center" dir="ltr">The human rights community has secured a framework and an approach that has been embraced by a broad array of other movements. </p><p dir="ltr">Over the last several decades, the human rights community has secured a framework and an approach that has been embraced by a broad array of other movements, focused on everything from indigenous peoples to internet freedom. There is also ample evidence that the human rights framework has been effective in confronting authoritarian regimes and, more broadly, in addressing violations related to political systems that persecute or discriminate against specific groups.</p><p dir="ltr">But its success in responding to human rights violations related to unfair or biased socio-economic systems has been much more limited. This observation does not hinge on comparing civil and political rights with economic, social, and cultural rights. It does suggest, however, that there is a common set of structural causes underlying human rights violations of all types that the human rights movement has not yet been able to address. </p> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Begins--> <div style="color: #999999; font-size: 11px; line-height: normal; font-style: italic; text-align: right;"> <img style="max-width: 100%; background-color: #ffffff; padding: 7px; border: 1px solid #999999;" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/Abregu.jpg" width="444" /> <br />Flickr/UN Women Asia and the Pacific (Some rights reserved) </div> <p style="color: #666666; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;"> Human rights defenders in Vrindavan, India.</p> <hr style="color: #d2d3d5; background-color: #d2d3d5; height: 1px; width: 85%; border: none; text-align: center; margin: 0 auto;" /> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Ends--> <p dir="ltr">For example, if you live in Brazil today your chances of being tortured for (strictly) political reasons are fairly limited. However, if you are black and poor your chances of being abused or killed by local or federal security forces are basically the same as 50 years ago.</p><p dir="ltr">This is not a new challenge, nor a new conversation, for the human rights movement. For at least 20 years now, one of the movement’s key questions is whether the human rights framework of the last 50 years can now be harnessed in new ways that suit the framework and fit our times.</p><p dir="ltr">Our response at the Ford Foundation has been, and continues to be, an unequivocal “yes”. It is clear to us that this remarkable framework can—and should—be applied to confronting inequality at its roots. And if inequality is a structural problem that also implicates social, cultural, and political systems, it is incumbent upon us to think about our human rights work in a different way. But how?</p><p dir="ltr">One important difference between addressing human rights violations that derive from flawed political systems, versus human rights violations based on socio-economic patterns, is that setting human rights standards is much more effective in addressing the former than the latter. Human rights standards, as a moral barrier to authoritarianism, may be extremely effective in the battleground of ideas. But those same standards are not that effective among a complex system of socio-economic norms and practices.</p><p dir="ltr">This is the challenge when we talk about “making human rights real”—the need to go beyond standard-setting to actual enforcement and implementation. The main reason that the movement has struggled to convincingly enter this terrain is that making human rights real for the vast majority of the world's people requires the movement to go beyond reporting abuses, developing norms, and litigating cases—and to engage in more comprehensive and collaborative work with non-human rights sectors. The foundation has been supporting these efforts for many years, and we now have a number of solid cases demonstrating that when human rights initiatives are put to work in alliance with other actors and social movements, the results are very promising.</p><p dir="ltr">This is not just about new tactical alliances, but a more in-depth form of collaboration that responds to the need to bring diverse knowledge and activism together. But given the times we live in, and its unprecedented challenges—from the digital revolution to a global order in distress—this new form of collaboration is essential. &nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">There are already some very powerful examples of this kind of integration among our partners and within the foundation. Our incipient work around criminalization is a case in point. We have defined this work as confronting a global trend to use the criminal system not as the “last resort” but rather as a “first response”. Societies across the globe are using the criminal system to contest values (persecuting LGBT people, criminalizing sexual and reproductive rights), to control specific groups (over-policing minorities), to protect private or corporate interests (criminalization of indigenous leaders in Latin America), and to suppress dissident voices (closing civic space).</p><p dir="ltr">Looking at criminalization as an intersectional issue touching on many parts of our work, we have asked our team working on gender, racial and ethnic justice to focus on criminalization when it harms people on the basis of their identity; our team working on civic engagement and government takes the lead when the focus is how criminalization limits civic engagement or trust in government; and our internet freedom team addresses the role of new technologies in the global trend toward criminalization.</p><p dir="ltr">Our work around natural resources and climate change, for example, has a strong focus on human rights, the same way that we aim to ensure that our work on inclusive economies continues our efforts around business and human rights. Our Mexico office is putting human rights at the very center of its work around impunity, while in other regions we are looking at more specific actors (extractive industries) or rights issues (housing).</p><p dir="ltr">Yet, in recent months there has been a renewed urgency among our key partners and within Ford to question if, instead of integrating human rights, we should actually go “back to the basics” and support international human rights bodies and institutions in a global context that is increasingly challenging.</p><p dir="ltr">There is no easy answer. But if this context teaches us anything, it is that we need to make human rights a local reality if rights are going to continue as a key part of our global culture. Integration needs to be the new international standard. </p><p>Yet our decision not to have a free-standing program focusing on the international human rights systems—as we have for the last 30 years at least—does not mean our funding is shifting away from this critical work.</p><p dir="ltr">As we confront inequality, we are working to redesign how we work to ensure that the successful human rights framework is harnessed to address the political and socio-economic systems that reinforce inequality. We believe human rights can and should be a powerful contributor to these efforts, not as a stand-alone sector but as an integrated part of a 21st century movement to achieve the promise of human dignity.</p><p dir="ltr">&nbsp;</p><p><i>***A version of this article <a href="http://www.fordfoundation.org/ideas/equals-change-blog/posts/what-strengthening-human-rights-has-to-do-with-challenging-inequality/" target="_blank">first appeared</a> on the Ford Foundation’s Equals Change Blog.</i></p><p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image 0'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title="imgupl_floating_none"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_large/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" alt="" title="imgupl_floating_none" width="300" height="115" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload 0 imagecache imagecache-article_large" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'></span></span></p> <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0; URL=' http://www.openglobalrights.org/new-strategies-for-tackling-inequality-with-human-rights/'" /><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="http://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/OpenGlobalRights-highlight4English.png" alt="" width="140" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-sidebox"> <div class="field-label"> Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a onmouseout="document.Imgs.src='https://opendemocracy.net/files/Economic_Inequality_1_0.png'" onmouseover="document.Imgs.src='https://opendemocracy.net/files/Economic_Inequality_2.png'" target="_blank" href="http://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/economic-inequality-and-human-rights"> <img alt="Economic Inequality and human rights – Read on" border="0" name="Imgs" width="140" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/Economic_Inequality_1_0.png" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/kate-donald/tackling-inequality-potential-of-sustainable-development-goals">Tackling inequality: the potential of the Sustainable Development Goals</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/david-barrett/tackling-economic-inequality-with-right-to-non-discrimination">Tackling economic inequality with the right to non-discrimination</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/uwe-gneiting/inequality-business-and-human-rights-new-frontier">Inequality, business and human rights: the new frontier?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/chris-albin-lackey/who-will-take-lead-on-economic-inequality-and-who-should">Who will take the lead on economic inequality, and who should?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/leonard-seabrooke-duncan-wigan/how-to-get-inequality-on-global-policy-agenda">How to get inequality on the global policy agenda</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/savio-carvalho/everyone-does-better-when-everyone-does-better">Everyone does better when everyone does better</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/ignacio-saiz-gaby-or-aguilar/introducing-debate-on-economic-inequality-can-human-ri">Introducing the debate on economic inequality: can human rights make a difference? </a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights Martín Abregú Global Economic Inequality and Human Rights Thu, 25 May 2017 08:30:00 +0000 Martín Abregú 111130 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Why it’s getting harder (and more dangerous) to hold companies accountable https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/ciara-dowd-elodie-aba/why-it-s-getting-harder-and-more-dangerous-to-hold-companies- <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/1024px-Sierra_Leone_Road.jpg" alt="" width="140" /></p><p>Corporations are using defamation lawsuits to shut down their detractors—and the problem is only getting worse. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/ciara-dowd-elodie-aba/por-qu-se-est-haciendo-m-s-dif-cil-y-m-s-peligroso-responsabi" target="_blank">Español</a>. <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/ciara-dowd-elodie-aba/pourquoi-il-est-de-plus-en-plus-difficile-et-plus-dangereux-d" target="_blank">Français</a>.</em></strong>&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <p dir="ltr">There is a crisis of impunity for corporate human rights abuses and it is getting worse. In our work with the <a href="https://business-humanrights.org/" target="_blank">Business &amp; Human Rights Resource Centre</a>, we track the latest legal developments in holding companies accountable for human rights abuses, to share knowledge among lawyers and ultimately strengthen accountability. For years, we have highlighted increasing barriers for victims to obtain justice. As companies are rarely brought to account, there have been few reasons for optimism.</p><p dir="ltr">So bad is the crisis of impunity that we have had to dedicate a significant portion of space in our latest <a href="https://business-humanrights.org/en/corporate-legal-accountability-annual-briefing" target="_blank">Annual Briefing</a> to the threats directed at advocates and lawyers working on corporate accountability. In 2016, we even saw Pavel Sulyandziga, a well-known indigenous leader in Russia and member of the UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights, speak out about the harassment he and his family are facing because of his work supporting local communities to retain control of their land from extractives companies.</p><p dir="ltr" class="mag-quote-center">Human rights defenders working on corporate accountability have faced killings, beatings and threats and are rarely, if ever, able to obtain justice.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>The law as a weapon</strong></p><p dir="ltr">Human rights defenders working on corporate accountability have faced killings, beatings and threats and are rarely, if ever, able to obtain justice. Moreover, the law is often used as a weapon. In the last two years, the Business &amp; Human Rights Resource Centre <a href="https://www.business-humanrights.org/en/business-human-rights-defenders-portal" target="_blank">has tracked</a> over 450 cases of attacks against human rights defenders working on corporate accountability. The most common is judicial harassment (40% of cases). </p><p dir="ltr">In February 2016, six activists opposing the use of villagers’ land for Socfin plantations were <a href="https://business-humanrights.org/en/sierra-leone-ngos-denounce-imprisonment-of-community-members-opposing-socfin-plantations-includes-company-response" target="_blank">jailed</a> after a Sierra Leone court found them guilty of destroying 40 palm oil plants. The activists <a href="https://business-humanrights.org/sites/default/files/documents/MALOA%20Position%20Paper%20%2010032016.pdf" target="_blank">say</a> they are innocent and see the trial as a “tactic to get us into prison so that we cannot raise our voice on the unacceptable land deals in Malen Chiefdom.”</p> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Begins--> <div style="color: #999999; font-size: 11px; line-height: normal; font-style: italic; text-align: right;"> <img style="max-width: 100%; background-color: #ffffff; padding: 7px; border: 1px solid #999999;" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/1024px-Sierra_Leone_Road.jpg" width="444" /> <br />Wiki Commons/LindsayStark (Some rights reserved) </div> <p style="color: #666666; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;">Six activists opposing the use of villagers’ land for Socfin plantations were jailed after a Sierra Leone court found them guilty of destroying 40 palm oil plants. The activists say they are innocent.</p> <hr style="color: #d2d3d5; background-color: #d2d3d5; height: 1px; width: 85%; border: none; text-align: center; margin: 0 auto;" /> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Ends--> <p dir="ltr">These types of legal harassment are often not intended to be successful claims, but rather are designed to silence human rights defenders by tying them up in costly litigation processes. In France, the NGO Sherpa has been sued by the company Vinci for <a href="https://business-humanrights.org/en/french-builder-vinci-accused-of-forced-labour-in-qatar-company-denies-claims" target="_blank">defamation</a>, after the NGO filed a criminal complaint in March 2015 against the company and its Qatari subsidiary over alleged forced labour on their construction sites in Qatar. <a href="https://www.asso-sherpa.org/legal-action-vinci-qatar-vinci-institutes-defamation-proceedings-claiming-exorbitant-damages-sherpa-organisation-employees" target="_blank">Sherpa said</a> of the lawsuits: “[b]y involving us in these costly proceedings, Vinci is plainly seeking to pressure us into withdrawing our action for lack of resources.”</p><p dir="ltr">These lawsuits are often a disproportionate response to statements as small as social media posts. During a mission to Indonesia in September 2016, we met with the NGO KontraS, which is currently campaigning against criminalisation of human rights defenders. They told us of an activist from the NGO WALHI (Friends of the Earth Indonesia) who <a href="https://www.amnesty.org/en/documents/asa21/4833/2016/en/" target="_blank">faced a criminal defamation complaint</a> by supporters of a land reclamation project in Bali, over a Twitter post that mocked them. In the US, <a href="https://www.aclu.org/news/environmental-protesters-fight-defamation-lawsuit-filed-coal-ash-landfill" target="_blank">community activists were sued</a> for USD 30 million by Green Group Holdings after they complained on social media about the company’s landfill and its impact on the local resident’s health. Lee Rowland, a senior staff attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union who worked on the case, said: “No one should have to fear a multi-million dollar lawsuit just for speaking up about their community—but our clients did.” </p><p dir="ltr">Lawsuits like these have a chilling effect on human rights activism and advocacy. The inequality of power and resources between large corporations with teams of lawyers and grassroots human rights defenders means that many activists may give into the demands of corporations rather than enter a costly legal battle. This chilling effect is immeasurably worse when defenders are threatened with physical assaults and death. </p><p dir="ltr"><strong>From impunity to accountability</strong></p><p dir="ltr">Companies benefit from an environment where there is freedom of speech, satisfied workers, and an increased consumer base, and governments attract investment when there is a strong <a href="https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/03/civil-rights-are-under-attack-here-s-why-the-business-world-should-care?utm_content=buffer1f2a8&amp;utm_medium=social&amp;utm_source=twitter.com&amp;utm_campaign=buffer" target="_blank">rule of law</a>. Governments should decriminalise defamation as advocated by international and regional organizations and leading NGOs, enact laws to protect human rights defenders and their lawyers from harassment, and provide an enabling environment and open civic space for those working on corporate legal accountability. &nbsp;(Of course, detractors would argue that criminal defamation laws are needed to protect their reputation, but there are still civil liabilities.) Governments should pass legislation to address strategic lawsuits against public participation, like those passed in <a href="https://anti-slapp.org/your-states-free-speech-protection/" target="_blank">several US states</a> and <a href="https://canadians.org/blog/win-ontario-passes-anti-slapp-legislation" target="_blank">Canadian provinces</a>. </p><p dir="ltr">Corporations can influence governments to improve by voicing opposition to governmental action or legislation that threatens to close the civic space. Natural Fruit filed a defamation lawsuit in Thailand against Andy Hall, a British labour rights activists and researcher, over a &nbsp;report &nbsp;that &nbsp;alleged &nbsp;labour &nbsp;abuse against &nbsp;migrant workers in the company's factories. The Senior Vice President of S Group, a Finnish retailer that sourced from Natural Fruit, <a href="https://innovation-forum.co.uk/analysis.php?s=thai-court-case-thats-redefining-corporate-activist-relationships" target="_blank">testified in support of Andy Hall</a> in the Thai criminal defamation lawsuit against him in July 2016. S Group’s action in this case demonstrates the steps companies can take to support human rights defenders under legal attack. Companies can also draft a dedicated policy on human rights defenders, like <a href="http://www.adidas-group.com/media/filer_public/f0/c5/f0c582a9-506d-4b12-85cf-bd4584f68574/adidas_group_and_human_rights_defenders_2016.pdf" target="_blank">adidas</a> has done, explaining why human rights defenders are important to their work and setting out expectations towards the company’s suppliers.</p><p dir="ltr">Everyone benefits from the work of human rights defenders and the promotion of the rule of law, so businesses and governments should work to support and protect them. The legal system should only be used to bolster the rule of law, not burden its defenders.</p><p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image 0'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title="imgupl_floating_none"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_large/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" alt="" title="imgupl_floating_none" width="300" height="115" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload 0 imagecache imagecache-article_large" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'></span></span></p> <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0; URL=' http://www.openglobalrights.org/why-it-s-getting-harder-and-more-dangerous-to-hold-companies-/'" /><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="http://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/OpenGlobalRights-highlight4English.png" alt="" width="140" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-sidebox"> <div class="field-label"> Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="//www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights-openpage"><img src="/files/openPagesidebox.png " alt="" width="140" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/mauricio-lazala-joe-bardwell/%E2%80%9Cwhat-human-rights%E2%80%9D-why-some-companies-speak-out-while">“What human rights?” Why some companies speak out while others don’t</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrightsopenpage/asuncion-lera-st-clair/corporate-concern-for-human-rights-essential-to-tack">Corporate concern for human rights essential to tackle climate change</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrightsopenpage/kevin-jennings/global-economic-scorecards-that-ignore-rights-reward-intoler">Global economic scorecards that ignore rights reward intolerance</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrightsopenpage/sif-thorgeirsson/doors-closing-on-judicial-remedies-for-corporate-human-rig">Doors closing on judicial remedies for corporate human rights abuse</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights-blog/gast%C3%B3n-chillier/prosecuting-corporate-complicity-in-argentina%E2%80%99s-dictatorship">Prosecuting corporate complicity in Argentina’s dictatorship </a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/david-petrasek/new-powers-won%E2%80%99t-play-by-old-rules">New powers won’t play by old rules</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights openGlobalRights-openpage Elodie Aba Ciara Dowd Global Tue, 23 May 2017 08:30:00 +0000 Ciara Dowd and Elodie Aba 111061 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Collective care in human rights funding: a political stand https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/meerim-ilyas-tatiana-cordero-vel-squez/collective-care-in-human-rights-funding-poli <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/Ilyas and CorderoMay.jpeg" alt="" width="140" /></p><p dir="ltr">To support the activists and groups that we fund, donors must engage in honest conversations around our own burnout and ethics. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/mental-health-and-well-being-in-human-rights" target="_blank">human rights and mental health</a>.<em><strong>&nbsp;<a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/meerim-ilyas-tatiana-cordero-vel-squez" target="_blank">العربية</a>.&nbsp;<a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/meerim-ilyas-tatiana-cordero-vel-squez/el-cuidado-colectivo-en-la-financiaci-n-de-l" target="_blank">Español</a>.&nbsp;<a href="https://opendemocracy.net/meerim-ilyas-tatiana-cordero-vel-squez/o-cuidado-coletivo-no-financiamento-de-direitos-humanos-uma-a" target="_blank">Português</a>. &nbsp;</strong></em></p> </div> </div> </div> <p dir="ltr">What is the responsibility of donors regarding the care practices of frontline activists? And how does our own well-being affect that of the people we fund? As a rapid response fund for women’s rights, we gather daily to discuss new applications for funding, which often involve issues of sexual violence. We take turns to offer analysis and debate on whether each request “fits our mandate”. This is a skill learned over time, a difficult one, which can make one feel expedient yet overwhelmingly responsible. And through each case of a woman activist risking her life, or an urgent situation where women’s and LGBTIQ rights are, once again, under threat, there is always a potential for a trigger. We, as women, often share similar histories, experiences and traumas with the activists we support. However, we have learned how crucial it is to heal oneself in order to support others facing similar issues. This is the only way to make collective transformation possible.</p><p dir="ltr" class="mag-quote-center">The experiences of women activists can be different than those of men, because of the gendered nature of threats and burnout.</p><p dir="ltr">The experiences of women activists can be different than those of men, because of the gendered nature of threats and burnout. The use or threat of sexual violence against women activists is very common, but it is also poorly documented, because it is often not reported or <a target="_blank" href="https://www.awid.org/publications/our-right-safety-women-human-rights-defenders-holistic-approach-protection">recognized</a>. Women human rights defenders are also <a target="_blank" href="https://ncdalliance.org/news-events/blog/fighting-for-equality-carries-massive-health-risks-particularly-if-you-are-a-woman">more likely to burn out</a> because of societal pressure and condemnation due to their gender, and responsibilities to support their children and other family members.</p> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Begins--> <div style="color: #999999; font-size: 11px; line-height: normal; font-style: italic; text-align: right;"> <img width="444" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/Ilyas and CorderoMay.jpeg" style="max-width: 100%; background-color: #ffffff; padding: 7px; border: 1px solid #999999;" /> <br />Urgent Action Fund (All rights reserved). </div> <p style="color: #666666; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;"> Regional Convening on Sustainable Activism, El Salvador 2015. Urgent Action Fund-Latin America.</p> <hr style="color: #d2d3d5; background-color: #d2d3d5; height: 1px; width: 85%; border: none; text-align: center; margin: 0 auto;" /> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Ends--> <p dir="ltr">We at the Urgent Action Sister Funds are deeply passionate about supporting women human rights defenders, but we are not the ones at the frontlines. We are not the ones who will be jailed, who will get beaten or harassed, or threatened with rape for fighting for justice and basic human rights. For most of us in the donor world, this is not the reality of everyday life. Yet we experience triggers and secondary trauma, and the sense of frustration and responsibility can drive us to the point of emotional and physical exhaustion. As one colleague shared, “I try to compartmentalize things and will try to turn off work, but I do have dreams about traumatic cases.”</p><p dir="ltr">As advocates and funders, we must be honest about our own sustainability. How do we begin? Caring practices are deeply individual, cultural, and even depend on economic background and political beliefs. An ethic of care is both individual and collective. For many, separating their work from their personal lives can support overall well-being; but, unfortunately, this is not always possible for those of us working in the field of human rights. As women working to protect and promote women’s rights, it can be challenging to separate our work from our own personal struggles and obstacles as women. As funders in general, we must be aware of our own privileges and assumptions around care.</p><p dir="ltr">To support the activists and groups that we fund, we must engage in honest conversations around our own burnout, which stems from our internalized practices and habits, and a lack of healthy polices. To be an ethical donor, we must include funding for well-being and safety for grantees, which can only happen if we understand and utilize care practices, as individuals and as organizations, collectively. We must move away from an “us” (donors) and “them” (activists) mentality in this field. Only then will we stop exhausting activists by demanding ever-more measurable results and lengthy reports rather than funding their basic healthcare needs or providing unrestricted funds to support their secure transportation, maternity leave, pensions, or basic security measures for their offices and homes.</p><p dir="ltr">Well-being includes proper time and space to assess the hidden risk of workload and activism. It includes funding adequate time for rest for an activist, after she spent several months or years in jail, so she does not have to worry about sustaining her family. It includes not scheduling 12-hour day seminars and conferences, because we as funders often have the luxury of influencing, if not setting, the agenda. It includes funding an assistant for the activist with a disability, so she can be fully present and comfortable during a meeting or conference, and not forcing people to eat while they work. We must practice awareness and respect for cultural expressions of well-being. If our aim is to support movement building, we need to be open to the ways in which different social movements and people understand and define care practices. For example, many indigenous people define well-being as an everyday holistic practice that enables balance in life and with every living being, not as an individual act or of an organization alone. If we are to make transformation happen, we must broaden our scopes and worldviews.</p><p dir="ltr">Establishing sustainable care practices requires ongoing exploration and engagement to find what works. In their brilliant guide “<a target="_blank" href="https://www.awid.org/resources/strategies-building-organisation-soul">Strategies for Building an Organization with a Soul</a>,” two African feminists, Hope Chigudu and Rudo Chigudu, offer concrete suggestions for how to create an organizational culture where “impassioned people go to work every day, inspired by working in an environment that increases both their well-being and productivity.”</p><p dir="ltr">If an organization engages in an ethic of care, well-being practices become collective and incorporated institutionally, and individuals will be motivated to create and sustain their habits. For example, Urgent Action Fund fosters such culture by holding two “Getting Nothing Done Days” per year, during which staff take a complete break from their work to rest and spend time with each other. At Urgent Action Fund - Latin America, staff members responsible for rapid response grantmaking are provided with ongoing psychosocial support to help with processing their frustration, pain, and difficult workload. In addition, “Sustaining Activism” has been incorporated as a cross-cutting program in an effort to institutionalize well-being across the organization. Many of our grantees have already incorporated care practices out of necessity, and there is much that human rights funders can learn from their practices. Other organizations, such as FRIDA, have been incorporating <a target="_blank" href="http://youngfeministfund.org/2016/10/practising-individual-and-collective-self-care-at-frida/">individual and collective care tools</a> in their everyday practice. &nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">Only when these conversations and practices take place in both directions—from funders to grantees and back again—can we begin to understand the importance of funding and sustaining activism of frontline defenders.</p><p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image 0'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title="imgupl_floating_none"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_large/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" alt="" title="imgupl_floating_none" width="300" height="115" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload 0 imagecache imagecache-article_large" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'></span></span></p> <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0; URL=' http://www.openglobalrights.org/collective-care-in-human-rights-funding-poli/'" /><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="http://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/OpenGlobalRights-highlight4English.png" alt="" width="140" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-sidebox"> <div class="field-label"> Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a onmouseout="document.Imgs.src='https://opendemocracy.net/files/Mental-health_inset_1.png'" onmouseover="document.Imgs.src=' https://opendemocracy.net/files/Mental-health_inset_2.png'" target="_blank" href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/mental-health-and-well-being-in-human-rights"><img alt="“Data" border="0" name="Imgs" width="140" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/Mental-health_inset_1.png" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/kristi-pinderi/when-advocacy-work-builds-resilience-everyone-benefits">When advocacy work builds resilience, everyone benefits</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/zelalem-kibret/ready-for-anything-how-preparation-can-improve-trauma-recovery">Ready for anything: how preparation can improve trauma recovery</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/holly-davis-magda-adamowicz/security-and-well-being-two-sides-of-same-coin">Security and well-being: two sides of the same coin</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/alexandra-zetes/turning-weakness-into-strength-lessons-as-new-advocate">Turning weakness into strength: lessons as a new advocate</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/sam-dubberley/when-watching-violence-is-your-job-workers-on-digital-frontline">When watching violence is your job: workers on the digital frontline</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/fred-abrahams/healthy-for-long-haul-building-resilience-in-human-rights-workers">Healthy for the long haul: building resilience in human rights workers</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/nzik-awad/we-cannot-afford-to-be-traumatized-reality-for-grassroots-advocates">We cannot afford to be traumatized: the reality for grassroots advocates</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights Tatiana Cordero Velásquez Meerim Ilyas Global Mental Health and Well-being in Human Rights Thu, 18 May 2017 08:30:00 +0000 Meerim Ilyas and Tatiana Cordero Velásquez 110912 at https://www.opendemocracy.net